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ANNUAL REPORTS OF 1878 



SUBMITTED TO THK 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



STATE OF INDIANA, 



IN FIFTY-FIRST REGULAR SESSION, 



BEGUN JANUARY 9, 1879. 



:f.a.:r,t i, 



il L*S J* 

INDIANAPOLIS: 

INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL COMPANY, STATE PRINTERS. 

1879. 



7 V' 



INDEX. 

1. Governor Williams' Biennial Message. 

2. Biennial Report of Governor's Financial Expenditures. 

3. Governor's Message — Special Session. 

4. Report of Pardons, Commutations and Reprieves, etc. 

5. Report of Secretary of State. 
-- 6. Report of Auditor of State. 

7. Report of Treasurer of State. 

8. Report of State House Commissioners. 

9. Report of State Librarian. 

10. Report of Adjutant-General. 

11. Report of Quartermaster-General. 

12. Report of State Board of Agriculture. 

13. Report of Indiana Horticultural Society. 



BIENNIAL MESSAGE 



James D.Williams, 



QOY lEIE^TODR, 



THE STATE OF INDIANA. 



TO TIKIE GE1T.ERAL ASSEMBLY, 
Fifty-First Regular Session. 



TRANSMITTED JANUARY 10, 1879. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL COMPANY, STATE PRINTERS. 
1879. 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, 

Legislative Department. 

Eeceived by the General Assembly, convened in the Hall of the House of Repre- 
sentatives in the Court House of Marion County, Friday, January 10, 1879, and 
transmitted to the Secretary of State for publication as ordered by each House. 

D. D. DALE, 

Secretary of the Senate. 

T. C. MAYS, 
Assistant Clerk of the House of Representatives. 



I, Webster Dixon, Clerk of the House of Representatives, certify that the fol" 
lowing resolution was, on the 13th day of January, 1879, adopted by the House, 
viz.: 

"Resolved, That there shall be printed for the use of this House three thousand 
copies of the Message of the Governor, delivered January 10, 1879 — two thousand 
to be in English and one thousand in German, and that said copies shall be distri- 
buted to the members of this House of Representatives." 

WEBSTER DIXON, 

Principal Clerk House. 
January 13, 1879. 



ATE I 

[INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA.]. 



GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 



Gentlemen of the General Assembly: 

I cordially welcome you to the Capital, for the discharge of the 
important duties entrusted to you by the people. It will be my 
pleasure to aid you in learning the transactions of the Executive 
Department of our State government, during the past two years, 
and in providing for the needs of our community during the ensu- 
ing two years, for which we are together responsible. 

The last General Assembly, having been convened in special 
session for the completion of important matters which had been 
inexcusably delayed until a late day of the regular session, 
adjourned March 15, 1877. 

The acts of the two sessions in one volume, with the "accurate 
statement of the receipts and expenditures of the public money," 
required by the Constitution, were so " published and circulated in 
the several counties of the State, by authority" that by the receipt 
and filing of the same in Pike county, they took effect July 2, 
1877, as evidenced by my proclamation of July 5, 1877. 

Joint resolutions proposing nine important amendments to the 
Constitution were passed, and the proposed amendments, having 
been agreed to by a majority of the members elected to each of 
the two Houses, were entered upon their journals and referred to 
the body now constituted of yourselves. It is desired that you 
take early action upon this pending business, that the proposed 
amendments, if agreed to by a majority of all the members elected 
to each house, may be at once submitted to the electors of the 
State, and, if ratified by them, be declared parts of our funda- 
mental law, upon which you may proceed to enact a series of 
wholesome laws now urgently demanded by the interests of our 
people. 



[ congratulate you that the instruction to our Senators and Rep- 
resentatives, conveyed by a joint resolution requesting them "to 
use all lawful means to procure the speedy enactment of a law of 
Congress restoring the legal-tender quality of the silver dollar of 
the coinage of 1792 and making the same a legal-tender for the 
payment of all debts, public and private, except as otherwise pro- 
vided by law," has aided in the restoration of our original unit of 
value, by an act of Congress, to which they gave their support. 
Sustained by its double metallic standard, our financial system 
gives promise of greater stability than when deprived of its support. 

The mandates of other resolutions, addressed to ministerial offi- 
cers, have been obeyed, and you will be advised of the conclusions 
reached by them. 

The act of March 7, 1877, providing judges to preside at 
adjourned terms and to try cases on change of venue from the 
judge of a circuit has been of advantage to litigants in securing a 
speedy trial ; but the provision for compensation, made in section 
5, has been so annulled by the later act making general appro- 
priations, that county treasurers have been embarrassed in their 
efforts to comply with an appropriation so unusual and irregular. 
Gentlemen who have performed services await further legislation 
providing for their compensation. 

The additional courts constituted for the counties of Marion, 
Allen, Cass, V anderburg, Jackson, Washington and Wayne have 
been organized by the appointment and qualification and subse- 
quent election of judges. 

The acts providing for the election of township officers were 
found to contain conflicting provisions, which must be harmonized 
by you. 

The modification of the act defining larceny and prescribing a 
punishment more within the discretion of the court than before 
has served a good purpose. It may be well to revise other sec- 
tions of the criminal code, in the light of this experience. 

The "act authorizing the acquisition of Green River Island, or 
to locate the true boundary line at said Island," has been so far 
executed as to learn from the Governor of Kentucky that the 
action of the Commissioner appointed by that State to make the 
survey had been ratified and confirmed by the Legislature. 

The attempted amendment of section 22 of the act for the 
incorporation of towns, conferring enlarged powers upon the Board 



of Trustees, has been held to be void, because violating a well- 
settled rule for the amendment of statutes. 

I appointed Messrs. Frank Emerson, John B. Hannah and Rob- 
ert P. Haynes, "three discreet persons, to settle and adjust the 
claims made against the State Prison South," payable out of the 
appropriation of $130,000, made by act of March 10, 1877. 
Their work was so discreetly and carefully done, as shown by their 
records and papers filed with the Auditor of State, that a highly 
satisfactory adjustment and settlement was made of that very 
troublesome floating indebtedness. 

Executive and Administrative Duties. 

The Constitution, in dividing the powers of the government, 
has vested "the legislative authority of the State" in yourselves, 
" the judicial power" in the courts, and the residue " the executive, 
including the administrative" " in a Governor." The duties of the 
respective offices denominated "administrative" are "directed by 
law." The officers are the ministerial agents of the people, upon 
whom duties are " enjoined by law," which must be literally and 
exactly performed. The Governor is charged with the duty " to 
execute the laws," "to suppress insurrection," and "to repel inva- 
sion," and is given ample military power. It is provided that "He 
shall, from time to time, give to the General Assembly informa- 
tion touching the condition of the State, and recommend such 
measures as he shall judge to be expedient." To do this, it is pro- 
vided further that "the Governor shall transact all necessary 
business with the officers of government and may require informa- 
tion in writing from the officers of the administrative department 
upon any subject relative to their respective offices," and it is 
enjoined that "He shaft take care that the laws be faithfully 
executed." He is given power, in his discretion to control the 
execution of process upon criminal judgments, and modify fines 
and judgments rendered upon forfeited bonds. To avoid the con- 
sequences of vacancies in certain ministerial offices and in the Gen- 
eral Assembly itself, he is authorized to appoint to the one and " issue 
writs of election to fill" the other. He may convene the General 
Assembly at a place remote from the seat of government, and 
"may at any time, by proclamation, call a special session." His 
part in the business of legislation is such that he may return 
to the General Assembly for its reconsideration any bill for an act 



presented to him for approval and execution. It thus appears that 
the Governor is not a ministerial officer, but, rather, a supervisor of 
the transactions of others, and possessed of discretionary powers 
peculiarly his own and entitled to a respect equal to that accorded 
to each of the other departments. If so, much legislation hereto- 
fore enacted, imposing laborious and responsible duties of a min- 
isterial character upon the office, has been justifiable simply 
because of the acquiescence of the incumbent in the will of the 
law-making bod}', and is not a good precedent to be followed. 

The duties incident to the establishment and management of 
Purdue University, the House of Refuge, the Orphans' Home, the 
Female Prison, the Insane Hospital, the State House, the valua- 
tion of property for taxation, and sundry other boards of an admin- 
istrative character, may be mentioned as examples of that disposi- 
tion. With a few exceptions, the office which I have the honor to hold 
has been treated with marked respect by the administrative officers 
amenable to it under the Constitution. The retiring State officers are 
entitled to great credit for the zeal, integrity and ability which 
they have displayed in the discharge of the duties of their several 
offices, during their four years occupancy thereof, and for the 
reforms which they have effected therein. Each has my grateful 
acknowledgments for his co-operation with me. One, who will enter 
upon a further and unusual term of service, has, in his election thereto. 
received a rare commendation from our appreciative people. 

Annual Reports, 1877. 

An act approved February 8, 1853, provides for annual reports 
of State officers and benevolent institutions, the same to be made 
to the Governor. Officers since created have by executive require- 
ment and implied legislative direction reported in like manner. These 
reports for the year ending October 31, 1877, fifteen in all, have 
Deen published in a volume of convenient form, entitled '' Annual 
Reports of Indiana, 1877," and are laid before you for your infor- 
mation. The Secretary of State communicates a condensed re- 
port of the business of his office for the year, including a report of 
the proceedings of the administrative boards, of which he is secre- 
tary ex officio, a register of state and county officers, commis- 
sioners of deeds, notaries public and justices of the peace and 
others to whom commissions have issued, a list of corporations 
and associations organized and other matters pertaining to the 
office. 



The reports of the Auditor and Treasurer together constitute a 
complete showing of the transactions of the treasury department. 
Upon the enactment of the appropriation laws of March 10, 
1877, the fiscal business was made to conform strictly to their re- 
quirements. 

The general fund had and received during the year.. ..$2,128,242 83 
And disbursed 1,859,005 36 



Leaving, October 31, 1877 $269,237 47 

The receipts included two hundred thousand dollars of the tem- 
porary loan, being the proceeds of a renewal at a less rate of 
interest of the part falling due December 1, 1876, which appears 
to have been paid. Each disbursement account has its authority 
in those acts, so much as precedes April 1 being legalized by the 
third section of the first act, and the others limited by the express 
terms of its sections one and two. 

As the accounts of each institution were verified by the Audi- 
tor of State, they constitute exhibits in detail of the sums charged 
to them. They will be carefully examined by your appropriate 
committees. 

The report from the Department of Public Instruction is brief. 
Its contents relate mostly to the enumeration and school attend- 
ance and the school funds and revenues for the year, and will 
reach you in a revised and more comprehensive form in the bien- 
nial report. 

Annual Reports, 1878. 

I respectfully transmit a report to you of " each case of reprieve, 
commutation or pardon granted, and also the names of all persons in 
whose favor remissions of fines and forfeitures * * have been 
made, and the several amounts remitted," during the years 1877 and 
1878, by my predecessor in office and myself, as required by the 
Constitution. Accompanying it are some tables approximating 
accuracy and showing the growth of crime and punishment of 
criminals since the reception of the first convict in the State 
Prison. Imperfect as our criminal statistics are, they may afford 
valuable aid in legislating upon an important and troublesome 
matter. The Constitution provides ''that the General Assembly 
may by law constitute a council, to be composed of officers of 
state, without whose advice and consent the Governor shall not 



have power to grant pardons in any case except such as may by 
law be left to his sole power." In order to relieve the executive of 
a great responsibility, I recommend a law in accordance with this 
proviso. 

For your information as to the transactions of the government 
during the year ending October 31, 1878, I lay before you reports 
made to me by officers named as follows: 

The Adjutant General. 

The Quartermaster General. 

The Secretary of State. 

The Auditor of State. 

The Treasurer of State. 

The Attorney General. 

The Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

The State Librarian. 

The Trustees of the Institute for the Education of the Blind. 

The Trustees of the Institution for Educating the Deaf and 
Dumb. 

The Trustees of the Soldiers' and Seamen's Orphans' Home. 

The Trustees of the State Normal School. 

The Trustees of Indiana University. 

The Trustees of Purdue University. 

The Directors of the State Prison South. 

The Directors of the State Prison North. 

The Commissioners of the House of Refuge. 

The Managers of the Female Prison and Reformatory Institu- 
tion. 

The Board of State House Commissioners. 

The Provisional Board of Commissioners for the Hospital for 
the Insane. 

The State Board of Agriculture. 

The State Horticultural Society. 



The Commissioners of the Hospital for the Insane have preferred 
to follow the mandate of the act of 1852, providing for the govern- 
ment of the Hospital, rather than the act of 1853 providing for an- 
nual reports from the subordinate officers to the head of the execu- 
tive service, and have made their report directly to you. It was 
received at my office December 7, and, appearing not to be made to 
it, was delivered to the Secretary of State that upon his organiza- 
tion of the House of Representatives he might deliver it to the 
Speaker. 

Militia. 

The act approved May II, 1861, for the organization and regula- 
tion of the Indiana Militia had so far become a forgotten relic of 
our civil war as to be omitted entirely from the last revision of the 
statutes. The Constituton (Article XII) provides who shall be sub- 
ject to military service, and that "the General Assembly shall de- 
termine the method of dividing the militia into divisions, brigades, 
regiments, battalions and companies, and fix the rank of all staff 
officers," and divide it into classes of sedentary and active militia. 
These requirements are met by the act of 1861. It prescribes the 
manner of organizing and mustering a company into the active 
militia, denominated " The Indiana Legion," and for the supply of 
arms and equipments; a system of instruction and encampments; 
councils of administration and courts martial; calls into active ser- 
vice, and resignations, dismissals and discharges. Until quite re- 
cently, the last named have been the most popular features of the 
law. Of the system a general officer, who observed its workings 
while protecting the southern border of the State from invasion in 
1862, wrote to his superior in command : 

" Much may be done to increase the efficiency of the Legion by 
proper amendments of the law. There must be some inducements 
to go into the companies, either by way of exemption from other 
burdens, or by bounty, or by both. Whatever the inducement may 
be, it must be a continuing one, so that it will have the effect not 
only to impel men to join the companies, but to continue in them 
and discharge the duties which result from membership. It can 
not be expected that men will long give up their other employments 
and spend their money to get up and maintain military organiza- 
tions without some inducement. *•'*.,* The law should pro- 
vide a short and efficient means of compelling attendance of mem- 



10 

bers at drill, etc. Its provisions on this subject are circuitous and 
inefficient. The law provides for swearing the members of the 
companies after the election and it is said, in many instances, that 
those who have signed the articles of association, not getting an 
office, have refused to take the oath. It is suggested to me that the 
oath should be administered first and the election held afterward. 
Other amendments might be suggested in regard to the organiza- 
tion of companies. The process ought to be greatly simplified." 

The present Adjutant General has succeeded in securing the or- 
ganization of twenty-one companies, those forming the associa- 
tions having been led to assume the burdens imposed by the law 
because of a generous rivalry between the lovers of military tac- 
tics and display in our leading cities and towns. You will be 
asked to add needed amendments to the existing statute, or to en- 
act a new law affording as much encouragement to military or- 
ganizations as do the laws of other States of equal rank. Occa- 
sion for the use by civil authority of a well-drilled and well-dis- 
ciplined body of troops may arise at any time in onr populous 
localities, or even in remote districts where men congregate who 
have little knowledge of our laws, and no respect for the peace 
and dignity of our State. . 

On the 26th of July, 1877, I was officially informed by the 
sheriff of Marion county that certain railway employees, because 
of a disagreement with their employers, had ceased from service 
and by their inactivity had occasioned an interruption and delay 
of transportation across his county; that no breach of the peace 
had come under his observation and no information of any had 
been received by him ; that, with the exception of the detention of 
railway trains, there had been no forcible violation of the peace ; 
and that no injury to person or property had been committed. He 
advised the issuance by me of a proclamation ordering all unlaw- 
ful assemblages to disperse, cease their violence and yield to the 
authority of law, expressing the opinion that such an order would 
command that respect which an officer occupying his position 
could not secure. In conclusion, he said : 

' " Such a proclamation from you as I suggest might accomplish 
the desired result; but, in my judgment, persuasion will not avail 
anything. I have no organized force at my command of any des- 
cription, but am utterly powerless in the event of a serious dis- 



11 

turbance, unless you will at once furnish me an adequate force to 
maintain the law." 

I at once issued and caused to be published my proclamation of 
that date. The organized companies in this county were ordered 
into camp at the United States Arsenal grounds, and the Adju- 
tant Genera], assisted by prominent citizens of Indianapolis con- 
stituting a "committee of safety," rapidly organized, mustered, 
officered and equipped other companies and caused them to en- 
camp on the same grounds. 1 requested General Ben Harrison 
to assume command of the forces so organized. He replied, say- 
ing: "I am very much obliged for this expression of your confi- 
dence, but the committee of safety had recommended General 
Dan Macauley for the place, and I would therefore ask you to com- 
mission him." He, however, took command of a company. Gen- 
eral Macauley was commissioned and immediately took command 
and organized a staff, which was also commissioned and entered 
upon duty with him. By advice of the committee of safety and 
especially of a member thereof, who is an experienced officer, and 
the commandant himself, to avoid the possible danger of a delay 
in transmitting formai requisitions to the ordnance department for 
ordnance stores due the State, I telegraphed the President saying: 
" In view of threatened domestic violence growing out of the rail- 
road strike, I request that authority be at once given to the com- 
mandant of the arsenal to render all the aid possible in preserving 
the public peace." 

Receiving at the same time and complying with requisitions 
for troops much less formal from the Governors of other States, 
and unaware of the fact that our militia was encamped under the 
shadow of the arsenal buildings and had good, reasons to draw 
from their stores, the Secretary of War replied (July 27, p. m.) 
as follows: "I am directed by the President to say that, in the 
absence of a call upon him under the constitution and statute for 
military aid in suppressing domestic violence, the federal troops at 
Indianapolis can only be used in protecting property of the United 
States and enforcing process of federal courts." 

It seems not to have occurred to the honorable Secretary that 
the arsenal was understood to be a depot of military stores, and 
not a garrison of men. Late in the night of that day, a lieutenant 
colonel of the United States army called upon me, saying: ''I 
have been ordered to this city with two hundred men to assist the 
civil authorities in preserving the peace and protecting property. I 



12 

have the honor to report to you my arrival and to ask if you have 
any instructions for me." Having made no requisition for troops, 
and having even been advised that my requisition for ordnance 
stores would not be complied with, I could then only reply to that 
effect. On the 28th, I was enabled to inform the sheriff of Marion 
county that an adequate force had been organized in his county, 
and would be placed at his disposal, upon his making formal requi- 
sition to the Adjutant General. 

Disturbances of a similar character arose in other localities, nota- 
bly in Allen county, and like preparation was made. These pre- 
parations in aid of local authorities and the counsel of prudent 
citizens, made the use of the force unnecessary and it was disband- 
ed. The expenditures were so carefully managed, that while the 
outlay of other States reached many thousands of dollars, our own 
were easily met by the limited appropriation for Military Contin- 
gent Expenses. Details will be communicated as required bylaw. 

I take occasion again to express my obligations to the citizens 
who promptly took up arms in support of the civil authorities, and 
especially to those wise counselors who were able by their cool- 
ness and reason to dissuade an extensive organization of deter- 
mined men from rash purposes and overcome the clamor of pas- 
sionate men for vindictive measures. It is a source of great satis- 
faction to our citizens that we passed through an ordeal involving 
to other communities, and threatening to us, the most serious con- 
sequences, without the loss of a life and with a small expenditure 
of the public funds. I am moved to so particular a statement of 
these occurrences now long past, first, because prominent gentle- 
men on the floor of Congress, and in carefully prepared addresses 
to our people, have manifested a disposition to distort their simple 
truth and, second, in order that you may provide in advance for 
such a possible emergency hereafter. 

Other disturbances growing out of our unsettled labor question, 
occurred in the mining region of Fountain county, with deplorable 
results. A want of due carefulness in the local authorities, resulted 
in the issuance and charge to that county of arms which were 
received from it upon approved bond by persons unworthy of 
membership in a company of the militia. It became the duty of the 
State authorities to review these proceedings and secure a return 
of the arms to the State and a disbandment of the company. This 
delicate duty was satisfactorily discharged by the Adjutant Gen- 
eral, whose report will more fully disclose its nature. At the request 



13 

of the Judge of the Fountain Circuit Court, troops were sent to 
and maintained in the county, for some weeks, to protect the lives 
and property of citizens, insure peace, and secure a prompt admin- 
istration of justice to offenders. The expenses of this call were 
met as before. 

The Quarter-master General accounts for the military stores 
received, issued, and now held by him. The state yet has a credit 
of $7,295.08 upon her account with the general government, under 
the act for a distribution of arms to the States. 

By my order, an experienced officer was detailed by the Adju- 
tant General to inspect the arms belonging to the State. As this 
duty had not been performed for many years, it will be of interest 
to learn the exact quantity and condition of our munitions of war, 
as disclosed by his report. 

It is proper that I should say to you that companies have been 
called out and kept in camp several days, and many of the mem- 
bers, who were laboring men, thereby lost their situations. Under 
section 33 of the law, they could receive only the small pay allow- 
ed to soldiers of the United States army, and the funds at my dis- 
posal would not admit of an additional allowance as bounty. I 
recommend an appropriation to pay them a reasonable compensa- 
tion for their services. 

The Benevolent Institutions. 

The Constitution makes it the duty of the General Assembly to 
provide by law for the support of institutions for the education of 
the deaf and dumb and of the blind, and also for the treatment of 
the insane. At the date of its adoption, an institution had been pro- 
vided for each of these classes, all having been founded about 
thirty years ago. 

From an attendance in 1848 of 92, and an annual expenditure 
of $11,765.83, the attendance of the Institution for the Deaf and 
Dumb has increased to 328, and the expenditure to $62,994.99. 
Twelve hundred and seven pupils have received instruction. The 
course of study has been enlarged and improved to correspond to 
the progress in the common school education guaranteed to our 
children Who have the use of their faculties. 

A table, showing the comparative attendance and expenses of 
the institution since 1853, is given by the trustees, in their report. 
More than one hundred children having claim to an education 
can not be received, because of a lack of accommodations for 



14 

them. You will be asked to provide for the construction of an 
addition to the present building. 

The average attendance of pupils in the Institute for the Edu- 
cation of the Blind, during the year, was 108. Five hundred and 
ninety-eight pupils have received instruction since the opening of 
the institute, in 1847. The expenditures for the fiscal year were 
in the sum of $31,404.96, being $259.20 per annum for each pupil. 
The estimate for the ensuing two years is made upon an antici- 
pated attendance of 120 pupils, at $230 each per annum. Addi- 
tional accommodations are asked. 

Since November 1, 1848, the Hospital for the Insane has 
received and treated 7,648 patients. During the past year, 470 
were admitted and the same number discharged, leaving 614 
remaining at the close of the year, as at the beginning. The 
expenditure was in the sum of $132,129.67. 

To provide for the large number of insane who need treatment, 
and several hundred who have been pronounced incurable and in 
need of the care and protection afforded by a State institution 
planned and constructed for the purpose, a new building, to be 
called the Department for Women, was authorized by an act 
approved March 11, 1875. Six hundred thousand dollars has 
been appropriated, and nearly all of that amount expended. You 
will be asked to inspect the work done, and provide means for 
completing and furnishing the building for immediate use. 

Since the transfer of the soldiers from the Soldiers' Home, at 
Knightstown, to the National Home, at Dayton, the institution has 
been devoted to the orphans of deceased soldiers and seamen. 
The building was destroyed by fire on the night of September 9, 
1877. The trustees used the money received upon policies of 
insurance for the construction of a building much more suitable 
for the purpose than was the former, and applied an unexpended 
balance of the. year's appropriation towards the payment of the 
additional expense, making $41,238.32 in all. You will be asked 
to reimburse the officers and teachers and other inmates, for their 
losses of clothing and other effects by fire. 

All superintendents, officers and employes engaged in any of 
the benevolent institutions of the State, who are boarding or lodg- 
ing in the institutions, should receive much less salaries than those 
who board and lodge themselves, and the superintendent or officer, 
who has a family boarding in the institution, should be required 
to pay board for any and all, except himself and wife, unless 
employed as assistants. 



!-5 
Education. 

Our educational interests have been under the careful supervi- 
sion of an officer possessing the confidence of the people. His 
biennial report will give you, in a comprehensive form, a history 
of the recent progress and present condition of our common school 
system, and, also, of the institutions of a higher grade, which have 
been the outgrowths of it. 

The reports of the trustees of Indiana University, Purdue Uni- 
versity and the State Normal School will disclose the fact that the 
higher education afforded by the State, is given at an expense far 
beyond that of other institutions sustained by private contribu- 
tions, and in excess of a just economy. The pupils who attend 
the Normal School do so to qualify themselves as teachers, the 
better to make a living thereafter. 

I am unable to see any good reason why they should not pay a 
reasonable tuition fee, thereby making the support of the school 
much less burdensome to the tax-payers, many of whom receive no 
direct benefit from it. The same rule could properly be applied 
to the two universities. 

The law authorizing each county to send two students, free of 
charge, to each of the universities, should be repealed, and all stu- 
dents should be required alike to pay a reasonable tuition fee. 

Our school fund is now reported in the sum of nine million dollars, 
which, perhaps, equals that of any other State in the union. It is 
constituted of the State's indebtedness (nearly four millions), the 
common school fund held by the counties (about two and one-half 
millions), and the congressional township school fund, (also about 
two and one-half millions,) each part requiring peculiar care in its 
management. 

I trust that it will be your pleasure to so administer this magni- 
ficent endowment as to produce the largest results in the interest 
of the rising generation. 

The State Board of Agriculture. 

Your attention is called to the financial report of the officers of 
the State Board of Agriculture. The Board owns thirty-six acres 
of land upon which their improvements are situated, and two 
acres east of the grounds, in all thirty-eight acres, upon which 
there is a mortgage of sixty thousand dollars drawing eight per 
cent, interest. Fiteen thousand three hundred dollars is due the 



16 

guarantors of the exposition fund. The State advanced twenty- 
five thousand dollars two years ago. It is for you to consider 
whether the State should pay seventy-five thousand dollars more 
and take the property, or lose the amount so advanced. Although 
the last was a very successful fair, the net earnings would not pay 
the interest on the indebtedness. I trust you will give this subject 
a careful consideration. 

Horticulture. 

Tha Horticultural Society has accounted for the small annual 
bounty of five hundred dollars appropriated for the encouragement 
of its work. You will be interested in the proceedings of its an- 
nual meetings as reported by the Secretary and published by the 
State. 

Crime and its Punishment. 

Crime has steadily and rapidly increased. Our old prison for 
male convicts is greatly overcrowded, and the new has had use for 
the additional accommodations provided by the last Legislature. 

The Female Prison has held more than three times the number 
transferred to it when it was opened in 1873. As required by the 
act of March 3, 1877, the Board of Managers was re-organized as 
thereby constituted, Mrs. Emily A. Roache, Mrs. Rhoda M. Coffin 
and Mrs. Eliza C. Hendricks receiving commissions for their res- 
pective terms, and assuming the duties imposed upon them by law. 
Assisted by Mrs. Smith, the Superintendent, and others, they have, 
as shown by their two reports, trained the inmates of the institu- 
tion to habits of industry, practiced a rigid economy in every de- 
partment and kept their expenditures within the appropriations. 
Some indebtedness for the enclosure of the grounds should be pro- 
vided for. The Managers have had much trouble and annoyance 
because of bad sewerage. I recommend an appropriation of four 
thousand dollars to secure a permanent and reliable system iu its 
stead, that being the amount of the estimate prepared. 

The Prison North had at the beginning of the last year 646 and 
at its close 605 convicts; 295 having been received, 340 released, 
and the average being 619. The disbursements were $75,295.73, 
being $ 868.06 in excess of the earnings. This excess is explained 
by the additional accomodations provided for an expected increase 
in the number committed to the prison. The new cell-house and 
work-shop authorized by the last Legislature, were completed and 



17 

a main sewer also built, leaving a balance of $19,666.03 of the 
$80,000 appropriated. This amount, the directors think, could well 
be devoted to the construction of a new dwelling house for the War- 
den, some cells for the insane convicts and a solitary for disciplin- 
ary purposes. Additional shop-room is asked. It is urged that 
the district of the prison be enlarged by the addition of one tier of 
counties next south of the line of demarcation, and that the good 
time of convicts be increased to twice that now allowed. In the 
education of the convicts required by law, the Moral Instructor 
finds great necessity for proper text books, and asks that they and 
books for general reading that will inculcate correct sentiments be 
provided. The salary of the physician is regarded by the officers 
as quite too small for the services expected, and they ask that it be 
increased to the proper amount. 

The Prison South had, at the beginning of the last year, 590 
convicts, received 335, making 925 in all, and released 299, leav- 
ing 626 remaining at the close. The daily average during the year 
was 626. Since its establishment in 1822, it has received 6,526 
convicts and released 5,900. More than two-thirds of those remain- 
ing are unmarried men. Less than one-third are over thirty years 
of age. Forty- four are sentenced for life. The expense of main- 
tenance per man, was $ 29.03 which was the lowest in ten years, 
being less than one-half the expenditure five years before. The 
total cost for the year was $72,733.19, being $28,539.53 in excess 
of the earnings. The report of the directors is a careful review 
of the condition of the prison and the present needs of the inmates. 
But a little over one-half the convicts have been leased. The State 
receives forty-five cents per man. It is supposed that the employ- 
ment of four-fifths of the convicts would make the institution self- 
sustaining. The diverse, but well-expressed, views of the directors 
and warden as to the best means of discipline, will demand your 
careful study. A better "good time" law is recommended by the 
directors. Because of the great increase in his labors, they are of 
opinion that the physician should receive a salary sufficient to jus- 
tify him giving his whole attention to the prison sick. Better pro- 
vision for the mental and moral instruction of the prisoners is 
asked. It is especially urged that opportunity be given for even- 
ing reading and study, by the supply of a light in each cell. The 
directors think the deprivation of light is an inhuman hardship 
which the General Assembly can not afford to longer disregard. 
Provision is asked for the insane, numbering about fourteen. The 
2 Gov. Mes. 



18 

prison has but one-half enough cells. More than three hundred 
have had to be kept in the chapel and other rooms, at greatly 
increased expense. A new cell-house must be provided, or the 
surplus convicts transferred to the Prison North. 

It will be for you to determine what course will best provide for 
this great increase of convicts, and impose the least burden upon 
good citizens who must meet the expense of their safe-keeping 
within prison walls. 

It is enjoined in the constitution "that the General Assembly 
shall provide houses of refuge for the correction and reformation of 
juvenile offenders." 

An institution for boys was established at Plainfield, in 1867, 
and has been in operation eleven years. One thousand one hun- 
dred and twentjr-eight boys have been admitted during that time. 
All can not be classed as offenders. Many have been committed 
for a reformation of their character, that they may be prevented 
from violating the laws. At the close of the last year 145 had 
been admitted, and 383 remained, that being the greatest number 
in the institution at any one time. 

The Board of Commissioners have reduced the expenditures 
greatly below the amount appropriated, leaving the surplus in the 
treasury. Their estimates for subsequent years appear in a reduced 
form. They have added to the accommodations and reformatory 
influences of the institution, and report it in good condition. 

Like provision for controlling the criminal inclinations of girls 
has been made in the Reformatory Department connected with 
the Female Prison. Two hundred and ninety-six have been 
received since 1873. 

The State Library 

was removed to the building rented for its accommodation, and 
has, by exchanges and purchases, received the usual additions to 
its shelves. The librarian and his lady assistant have filled with 
credit their respective positions, as their careful preparations for 
your meeting will convince you. 

Hon. Horace P. Biddle, of our Supreme Court, who has devoted 
his life to general literature, as well as to that of his profession, has 
expressed to me a "desire to dispose of" his "library to the State 
of Indiana, to be kept as a part of the State Library. It contains 
about six thousand volumes, collected at a cost of over ten thou- 
sand dollars, and is the gradual accumulation of fifty years." He 
proposes to sell the entire library to the State for a nominal 



19 

sum," retaining its possession and use during his life and provid- 
ing for its delivery " by contract upon a consideration reaching 
each volume rather than by donation that" he "may know the 
books will ultimately reach their destination." 

Recognizing the necessity for legislative action authorizing the 
librarian to make such a contract, he holds himself in readiness at 
any convenient time to adjust the details. 

New State House. 

The last General Assembly, by an act approved March 14, 1877, 
authorized and provided for the erection of a new State House and 
for matters incident thereto. I appointed General Thomas A. 
Morris and General John Love, of Marion county, W. It. McKeen, 
Esq., of Vigo county, and Hon. I. D. G. Nelson, of Allen county, 
as prominent representatives of "the two political parties of the 
State," who should, together with myself, " constitute the Board of 
State House Commissioners." They at once qualified, and each 
gave the required bond and entered upon the discharge of his duties. 
Mr. McKeen, on account of private business, found it necessary, 
in January last, to tender his resignation, which was reluctantly 
accepted. I immediately appointed Hon. John Collett, of Ver- 
milion county, as his successor. He accepted the office, qualified 
and gave bond, and still serves as a member of the Board which is 
otherwise unchanged. The Commissioners have pushed forward 
the work as fast as the means at their command would warrant. 
In addition to the quarterly reports made, as required " for the use 
of the public" and containing "a synopsis of their proceedings and 
an account of their expenditures," I requested that they make their 
report for the last quarter so comprehensive as to include the doc- 
uments and proceedings which are, in their opinion, important for 
your information. Such a detailed statement has been prepared 
and is herewith submitted for your careful examination. The tax 
levy was for the year 1877 one cent and for 1878 two cents on 
the one hundred dollars. At the close of the year ending October 
31, 1878, the proceeds of the tax had reached $42,023.56, most of 
which had been expended upon orders of the Board. The pro- 
ceeds of the current levy' will, perhaps, not greatly exceed one hun- 
dred and fifty thousand dollars, 1 which is not as much as ought to 
be and could be, profitably expended during the year. 

The constitution provides that "no law shall authorize any debt 
to be contracted on behalf of the State, except in the folio win o- 
cases : to meet casual deficits in the revenue ; to pay the interest 



20 

on the State debt; to repel invasion, suppress insurrection, or, if 
hostilities be threatened, provide for the public defense. Our exist- 
ing indebtedness has been justified in part, by each of these pro- 
visions. Our heaviest interest charge (exceeding one-fourth of a 
million dollars per annum,) is upon an indebtedness to the com- 
mon school fund, caused by the use of its moneys for general 
expenses. In the absence of any provision for its payment, we 
may assume it to be the settled policy of the State to make the 
loan perpetual. If so, you can safely provide for a special annual 
levy of say five cents on the one hundred dollars to pay the inte- 
rest upon our indebtedness and to gradually discharge the other 
claims growing out of a negligent administration of the school 
revenues in former years. 

The Temporary Loan largely represents the old indebtedness 
incurred by our system of internal improvements before the adop- 
tion of our present constitution and reasonably included with our 
" State debt" referred to therein. Having made special provision 
for these extraordinary demands by authorized loans and separate 
taxation, the revenues of the General Fund at a greatly reduced 
rate, say seven cents, will be found adequate to meet the ordinary 
expenses of an economical administration of the State government 
and increase the means for the rapid prosecution of this work. 
The appropriation of a sum sufficient for the immediate comple- 
tion and furnishing of the structure while the times are so favor- 
able to cheapness would, perhaps, create such "a casual deficit" 
as would justify a loan. In my opinion, the advantages resulting 
from a speedy completion of the- enterprise which we have begun 
would greatly overbalance the interest to be paid until our tax- 
payers shall have gained relief from their present heavy burden of 
local taxes. I recommend that you do, at least, continue the pres- 
ent levy " of two cents upon each one hundred dollars worth of 
taxable property in the State " for the " New State House Fund " 
in addition to any appropriation you may see cause to make from 
the "General Fund." 

United States Senator. 

Hon. Oliver P. Morton, our senior Senator in Congress, died at 
his home in this city, November 1, 1877, worn out by a life of un- 
usual activity in the public service. Thousands of our fellow 
citizens and many visitors from other States followed each other 
in solemn procession through the corridor of the building in which 



21 

you are now met, viewing for the last time his familiar face as he 
lay in state, and afterwards accompanying his mortal remains to 
their resting place in Crown Hill Cemetery, near where he made 
his last public address to the people. Having filled a prominent 
place in the affairs of our State and country, his public life is fa- 
miliar to the present generation, and his acts have become a part 
of our history for the study of those who will come after us. 

I. appointed Hon. Daniel W. Voorhees to fill the office made 
vacant by his death. It will be your duty to elect a successor. 

Representation in Congress and the General Assembly. 

My views upon the question of a re-apportionment of the State 
for congressional and legislative purposes have been frequently ex- 
pressed, and were communicated at length to the last General As- 
sembly. The districts for the election of members of congress 
are manifestly irregular in form, and their population is out of due 
proportion to each other. The requirement that a senatorial or 
representative district, where constituted of more than one county, 
shall be composed of contiguous counties was literally fulfilled; 
but its spirit was grievously violated in essential features. Some 
of you have been elected by a voting population much less than 
the average, while others have a constituency greatly in excess. I 
recommend the enactment of a just law in each case, and such I 
will gladly approve. The Auditor of State reports the enumera- 
tion necessary for your information in making the apportionments. 

Our County System. 

While many of the older States were established upon "the town 
system," our own has grown up on the basis of " the county sys- 
tem, " more suitable to the habits of our western people. The 
enabling act of April 19, 1816, recognized the thirteen existing 
counties and they were represented in the convention forming our 
Constitution. Ninety-two such subdivisions of our territory now 
exist, each for itself administering important local affairs at great 
expense to the people. Our board of county commissioners is in 
legal contemplation the county and as such is declared to be a body 
corporate and politic, and entrusted with large " powers of a local 
administrative character. " Prohibited from passing local or spe- 
cial laws regulating county and township business, the election of 
county and township officers and their compensation, the General 



22 

Assembly has for many years tried in vain to reduce the county 
business to a simple, economical and uniform system. I wish you 
better success. Recently a commission of experienced gentlemen 
appointed by Marion county has given the subject careful study 
and reduced the results to a form suitable for your consideration. 

Our laws fixing the compensation of officers were enacted when 
times were flush, when the necessaries of life were high and when 
labor received better compensation and was in greater demand 
than now. Therefore, I recommend a reduction of all fees and 
salaries in accordance with the times. 

Our cities and towns should be reduced to a proper subordina- 
tion to the counties of which they severally constitute parts. They 
are now almost independent of State supervision, and involve 
their citizens in needless expenses. The assessment and collec- 
tion of their revenues alone by one set of officers in a county 
would result in a great saving, and is recommended. 

Expert Evidence. 

The statutes say that witnesses subpoenaed to testify in the 
county where they reside shall not be entitled to demand and 
receive their fees in advance. I see that some gentlemen who had 
been subpoenaed to testify as expert witnesses in an important 
criminal trial in progress in this county recently refused to testify 
unless fees were paid in advance. 

I can not see any good reason why one class of citizens shall be 
compelled to attend and testify, under a penalty of fine and impris- 
onment, and another class embarrass the proceedings of a court 
because the party wanting their evidence is unable to pay them 
fees in advance. 

I recommend that you remedy this growing evil ; for, if you have 
the right to pay or excuse one class, you have the right to pay or 
excuse all others, in the same manner. 

Our Judicial System 

needs your careful consideration, and wise legislation. Too much 
of the time of our circuit courts is occupied with suits brought for 
small sums, especially by administrators, the costs of which equal 
the amount recovered. 

I recommend that you remedy this evil, and suggest the pro- 
priety of enlarging the jurisdiction of Justices of the Peace, so as 



23 

to relieve the circuit courts of a great deal of business of a frivo- 
lous nature involving no unsettled questions of law or practice. 
At the same time you could, perhaps, relieve the supreme court in 
a great measure by a further limitation of its jurisdiction, and 
making judgments of certain classes final, without appeal there- 
from. A speedy and economical administration of justice is 
demanded by the times. 

Laws and Journals. 

Unnecessary delay has occurred for many years in publishing 
and circulating the laws and thereby putting them in force and 
in printing and distributing the journals. I respectfully suggest 
that you provide for the printing of the journals at the close of each 
day's proceedings, that they may be carefully inspected and cor- 
rected the next morning by the members, thus securing accuracy, 
promptness and a great saving in the work and expense, and keep- 
ing yourselves and the people advised of the progress of your 
business. The acts should be printed in the order of their enact- 
ment and, the financial statements being ready and appended, they 
could be given to the people at an early day after your adjourn- 
ment. The Secretary of State makes some further recommenda- 
tions which should receive your consideration. 

The State Finances. 

The reports of the treasury department are full and complete. 
The last legislature reduced the State tax from thirteen to twelve 
cents on the one hundred dollars. The proceeds of that levy, with 
delinquent taxes, docket fees and taxes otherwise collected, and 
amounts reimbursed by counties and received from prison con- 
tractors have been sufficient to defray the expenses of the several 
departments and institutions in whose favor appropriations were 
made. I trust the same amount will be sufficient to pay the ex- 
penses for the next two years. It is not the State taxes, but the 
county and township taxes and fees of officers that oppress the 
people. They are double and in many instances, three times that 
of the State. 

The general fund had and received during the last 

year $1,860,777 61 

And disbursed 1,497,356 20 

Leaving, October 31, 1878, $363,421 41 



24 

The receipts and disbursements each include the two hundred 
thousand dollars of temporary loan, falling due April 1 and 
renewed. 

The treasury statement for the month ending December 31, 
1878, shows the balance, at that date, of "General Fund" in the 
sum of $636,321.78. 

The public debt was, at the close of the fiscal year, ■$ 4,998,- 
178 34, having been reduced in the sum of $4,360. Of this 
$1,093,395.12 is "foreign," and $3,904,783.22 "domestic," being 
evidenced by five non-negotiable bonds held by the school fund. 

The total value of the taxable property was, in 1877 $855,190,125 

In 1878, 850,616,987 

The total number of taxable polls was, in 1877, 297,931 

In 1878, 300,000 

Having, through your committees, gained information as to the 
correctness of the Auditor's detailed estimates of the expenditures 
to be defrayed from the treasury for the ensuing two years, and 
the resources of a miscellaneous nature, it should be the work of 
but a few days to prepare and pass bills for appropriation laws, 
and for a law fixing the rate of taxation, and for renewing tempo- 
rary loans. 

I sincerely hope that, realizing the limited term for which you 
are convened, you may be able, at an early day, to consider the 
matters communicated to you, and that your most important busi- 
ness may not be delayed until the confusion incident to the clos- 
ing hours of the session shall involve you in errors which you 
will afterwards regret. 

JAMES D. WILLIAMS. 

Executive Department, Governor's Office, 
Thursday, January 9, 1879. 



BIENNIAL REPORT 



OF THE 



GOVERNOR 



OF 



EXPENDITURES 



FROM THE 



CIVIL CONTINGENT FUND, THE MILITARY CONTINGENT FUND, 
AND THE OFFICE EXPENSE FUND. 



TRANSMITTED JANUARY 10, 1879. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL COMPANY, STATE PRINTERS. 
1879. 



Eeceived by the General Assembly, convened in the Hall of the House of Rep- 
resentatives, Friday, January 10, 1879. 

D. D. DALE, 
Secretary of the Senate. 
T. C. MAYS, 
Assistant Clerk of the House of Representatives 

Referred to Committee on Ways and Means. 

February 6th, reported back, read, and 300 copies ordered printed. 



REPORT. 



To the Committee on Public Expenditures of the Fifty-first General 
Assembly : 

Gentlemen: — In obedience to the requirements of the act 
approved March 10, 1877, making appropriations for the expenses 
of the State government, and especially of the proviso contained in 
the first clause of section two, the Governor has the honor to report 
in detail the expenditures allowed by him from the Governor's Civil 
Contingent Fund, the Governor's Military Contingent Fund, and 
the Governor's Office Expense Fund, provided for the seven months 
beginning April 1 and ending October 31, 1877, as follows: 

Civil Contingent Expenses. 

[Appbopkiation, 13,000.] 

May 10. To C. A. Buskirk, Attorney General, for taking 

depositions in Switzerland $32 75 

Sept. 6. To Harry Colcord, for portrait of Governor 

James D. Williams, for the State Library 200 00 

Sept. 6. To Harbison & Abrams, for posting proclama- 

mation of the Governor, etc 6 00 

Sept. 15. To Samuel R. Tegarden, for residue of reward 
for the arrest and conviction of the mur- 
derers of Thomas Moody 300 00 

$538 75 
Unexpended October 31, 1878 2,461 25 

$3,000 00 



MILITARY CONTINGENT EXPENSES-AFTER MARCH 31, 1877. 
[Appropriation, $3,000.] 



No. 546 

548 
557 
558 
559 
553 
564 
665 
566 
567 
568 
569 
570 
571 
672 
574 
575 
576 
577 
578 
579 
580 
581 
582 
583 
584 
585 
586 
587 
589 
590 
591 
593 



When Dated. 



June 1,1877. 
June 8,1877. 
July 25, 1877. 
July 31, 1877. 
July 31, 1877. 



August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

August 10 

August 10 

August 13 

August 17 

August 17 

August 17 



,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
, 1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877.. 
,1877. 



To Whom Paid. 



S. Beck .... 

Fred. Faut 

W. Harmaning 

Adams Express Co 

O. Rassman 

Frank. M. Ryan 

P. Keller 

S. B. Willson 

H. Bamberger 

M. D. Walter 

W. H. Houston 

M. W. Lynch 

Western Union Tel. Co- 
Daniel Kiley 

Hibben, Pattison & Co... 

Daniel Maeauley 

J. W. Gordon 

W. P. Fishback 

S. K. Fletcher, Jr 

L. Howland 

C. L. Holstein 

E. L. Williams 

D. H. Chase 

F. W. Faut 

F. L. Bixby, treasurer... 

W. E. Sharpe 

N. T. James 

W. Harmaning 

A. E. Sharpe 

J. J. Palmer 

F. L. Bixby, treasurer.... 

C. R. Smith 

J. D. Nicholas 



Fob What Paid. 



Expenses of arsenal..,. 

Expense repair of aims, etc 

Hauling arms and stores 

Transportation of arms 

Victualing militia 

Fatigue caps 

Victualing militia 

Victualing militia 

Fatigue caps 

Pay of company "A" 

Special services 

Special services 

Telegraphing 

Pay of company "A" 

Blouses and blankets 

Pay as brigadier general , 

Pay as colonel 

Pay as captain 

Pay as captain 

Pay as captain 

Pay as captain 

Pay as orderly sergeant on staff.. 

Pay of company 

Pay of detachment artillery 

Pay of company "B" 

Pay as sergeant 

Pay as captain 

Transportation of arms, etc 

Victualing militia 

Pay of company "D" 

Pay of company "E" 

Victualing Ind. Light Infantry.. 
Major's pay— part 



Total 53,000 00 



$12 25 
17 50 
28 00 
11 30 

151 80 
10 50 
93 30 
72 60 
15 00 

132 30 

20 00 

20 00 

7 26 

377 49 
87 78 
76 35 

38 88 
22 24 
22 24 
22 24 
22 24 

2 86 

115 78 

67 48 

606 51 

2 13 

72 15 

19 05 

39 75 
158 46 
229 04 
346 50 

7* 92 



Governor's Office Expense Fund. 

[Appropriation, $500.] 

For telegraphing $2 21 

For Indianapolis Sentinel, two copies, six 

months 12 00 

For Cincinnati daily papers 5 10 

For postage stamps 10 00 

For telegraphing 7 44 

For Indianapolis Journal, two copies, six 

months 12 00 

For Cincinnati daily papers . 10 20 

For Cyclopaedia 126 00 

For hanging Centennial map of U. S 6 00 

For postage stamps 10 00 

For telegraphing 12 22 

For cleaning and laying carpet 6 30 

For telegraphing 2 67 

For linoleum 3 75 

For Sentinel, two copies, six months 12 00 

For stove and pipe 9 25 

For Cincinnati daily papers 10 20 

$257 34 

Unexpended October 31, 1877 242 66 

$500 00 

YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1878. 
Civil Contingent Expenses. 

[Appropriation, $5,000.] 
Paid: 

Aug. 31. To R. R. Rouse, for cess-pool to abate nuisance 

at Female Prison $281 05 

Oct. 31. Balance unexpended 4,718 95 

$5,000 00 



Paid ; 


May 


4. 


May 


12. 


May 


17. 


June 


7. 


July 


6. 


July 


20. 


Aug. 


4. 


Aug. 


23. 


Aug. 


30. 


Sept. 


3. 


Sept. 


5. 


Sept. 


25. 


Oct. 


3. 


Oct. 


3. 


Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


22. 


Oct. 


30. 



Military Contingent Expenses. 



[Appropriation, $5,000.] 

Paid (after November 1, 1877,) amounts allowed as follows: 

Aug. 17. To John D. Nicholas, pay $80 93 

Aug. 21. To M. S. Rizer, pay of Cass Blues 80 80 

Aug. 23. To S. J. Irish, victualing militia 55 00 

Aug. 29. To John D. Nicholas, pay 76 45 

Sept. 4. To Wiles, Coffin & Smith, provisions 143 55 

Sept. 6. To Henry C. Adams, pay of Co. "G" 161 47 

Sept. 6. To Benj . Harrison, pay of Co. " C " 228 96 

Sept. 6. To H. B. Howland, pay as sergeant 2 13 

Sept. 22. To J. J. B. Hatfield, services for Q. M. Gen.. 60 81 

Sept. 22. To Samuel Beck, expenses of Q. M. General.. 10 75 

Dec. 19. To Charles P. Conard, livery 5 00 

1878. 
Jan. 5. To J. J. B. Hatfield, handling stores, cleaning 

guns, etc 8 00 

Jan. 5. To Samuel Beck, Q. M. General, transporta- 
tion of arms and postage 7 00 

Feb. 18. To Wm. Harrnaning, removing military stores 45 00 

March 1. To Samuel Beck & Son, for cleaning arms, etc 106 00 
March 2. To George W. Russ, Adjutant General, for 

one year's postage 60 00 

Mar. 15. To Robert S. Foster, pay of Co. "H" 114 78 

Mar. 15. To George H. Chapman, pay of Co. "I" 214 52 

May 4. To Warner & Smiley, livery 5 00 

June 7. To Geo. W. Russ, Adjutant General, expenses 301 30 

June 7. To James Miller, pay as Capt. and A. A. G... 65 00 

June 8. To James S. Hinton, services and expenses.... 10 00 

June 11. To William Harrnaning, freight and drayage.. 4 75 

July 1. To William Harrnaning, freight and drayage.. 5 85 

July 1. To George W. Russ, additional pay, etc 60 00 

July 3. To Indianapolis Light Infantry, for pay 238 76 

July 3. To Indianapolis Light Infantry, for transpor- 
tation, etc 181 05 

July 3. To Fred Deitz, gun boxes and lids 10 50 

July 9. To Samuel Beck, cleaning arms, etc 57 00 

July 9. To Lane Guards, pay .> 179 17 

July 9. To Lane Guards, subsistence 105 75 

July 9. To James Miller, pay of Captain and A. A. G. 65 00 



July 29. To Receiver I„ B. & W. Railway Company, 

for transportation ". $307 30 

Aug. 21. To Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad Com- 
pany, for transportation 23 22 

Sept. 17. To George W. Russ, Adjutant General, for 

postage from March 1 to August 1 35 60 

Sept. 17. To David Webb, transportation of militia 20 00 

Sept. 17. To John M. Sullivan, transportation of militia. 20 00 

Sept. 18. To Hanson, Van Camp & Co., hardware 10 27 

Oct. 1. To Samuel Beck, Quarter-Master General, for 

tools, materials, etc 19 78 

$3,186 45 
Unexpended October 31, 1878 1,813 55 

$5,000 00 

Governor's Office Expenses. 

[Appropriation, $500.] 
Paid: 

Nov. 1. Fordater $8 00 

Nov. 3. For telegraphing 3 22 

Nov. 22. For stove pipes, etc 15 75 

Dec. 3. For telegraphing 1 64 

Dec. 5. For incidental cash payments 3 90 

1878. 

Jan. 2. For telegraphing 6 02 

Jan. 7. For Indianapolis Journal, two copies 12 00 

Jan. 8. For postage, expressage, etc 6 88 

Jan. 22. For Cincinnati papers 10 20 

Feb. 2: For Louisville Courier-Journal 12 00 

Feb. 2. For telegraphing 3 89 

Feb. 26. For Indianapolis Sentinel, two copies 12 00 

Mar. 2. For telegraphing 1 46 

Mar. 25. For postage, freight, etc 8 90 

Mar. 28. For Indianapolis Directory 4 00 

April 3. For telegraphing 97 

Aprilll. For book shelves 12 00 

April 17. For Cincinnati papers 10 20 

April23. For furniture and repairing 30 45 

May 2. For telegraphing 2 61 

May 28. For postage, freight, etc 15 25 

July 3. For telegraphing 4 87 



8 

July 9. For Indianapolis Journal, two copies $12 00 

July 26. For Cincinnati- daily papers 10 20 

July 30. For postage stamps 10 00 

Aug. 2. For telegraphing 4 92 

Sept. 14. For Cincinnati daily papers 8 50 

Oct. 2. For telegraphing 2 05 

Oct. 19. For whitewashing...: 3 00 

Oct. 19. For cleaning carpets 10 44 

$247 26 

Unexpended October 31, 1878 252 74 

$500 00 



1 Each of the above sums has been on a bill of account approved 
and allowed by the Governor and paid by requisition to the Aud- 
itor of State and his warrant to the Treasurer of State. The sev- 
eral bills of account have been entered of record in the " Official 
Record " of the Governor's office when allowed, and will be sub- 
mitted to the inspection of the Committee if desired. 

The Auditor of State will be asked to add his certificate to the 
correctness of the foregoing statements. 

Samuel R. Downey, 

Secretary. 

Governor's office, January 9, 1879. 



Office of Auditor of State, 
January 9, 1879. 

Upon request, I have examined the foregoing report and find it to 
be correct, namely : 

Civil contingent expenses to October 31, 1877 $538 75 

Military contingent expenses to October 31, 1877 3,000 00 

Governor's office expenses to October 31, 1877 257 34 

Civil contingent expenses to October 31, 1878 281 05 

Military contingent expenses to October 3!, 1878 3,186 45 

Governor's office expenses to October 31, 1878, [$247 26]. 252. 74 

E. Henderson, 
Auditor of State, 



MESSAGE 



James D. Williams, 



GOVERNOR 



THE STATE OF INDIANA 



TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 

SPECIAL SESSION, 1879. 



TRANSMITTED MARCH 11, 1879. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL COMPANY, STATE PRINTERS AND BINDERS. 

1879. 



MESSAGE OF THE GOVERNOR. 



Gentlemen of the General Assembly : 

I regret that I have been compelled to cause you to convene in 
special session to complete the business which should have been 
accomplished during the regular session, which closed yesterday. 
In concluding my biennial message, I expressed the hope that, 
realizing the limited term for which you were convened, you might 
be able at an early day to consider the matters communicated to 
you, and that your most important business might not be delayed 
until the confusion incident to the closing hours of the session 
should involve you in errors which you would afterwards regret. 
The present condition of your business justifies the admonition 
which the experience of many years then had taught me. I pre- 
sume that I may not officially know what has created this emergency, 
but the people, whose servants we are, will in due time fix the 
responsibility where it belongs and administer the chastisement 
which faithless and incompetent representatives may always expect 
from an outraged constituency. 

During the fifty-nine days ending Saturday last, and' before the 
" two days next previous to the final adjournment" had commenced 
to run, the joint committee on enrolled bills presented to me 
eighteen bills which had originated in the Senate and twelve which 
had originated in the House of Representatives. These, being 
thirty in all, I have signed. They constitute the legislation upon 
which you must have been judged without the opportunity now 
afforded you by the exercise of the constitutional power vested in 
me. An examination of these acts suggests that our modern idea 
of legislation not only contemplates a special session at the conclu- 
sion of each regular session of the General Assembly, but, in addi- 
tion, expects that a large part of that time shall be devoted to set- 



ting right the errors of town and city officers, and other agents of 
the people; defining existing laws; relieving sureties on official 
bonds; .changing judicial circuits to accommodate personal preju- 
dices against presiding judges; changing the terms and times of 
holding court in counties to suit the convenience of a select few at 
the expense of the great mass of the people who have become 
accustomed to the existing calendar; enacting under th£ forms of 
general law that which is of necessity local and special, and in 
direct violation of the constitution ; and thus, while affording to 
small localities the temporary relief given by an act of doubtful 
sufficiency, leave the measures for which the people of the whole 
State have long waited to fall into confusion and neglect. Twelve 
of the acts received and signed may be classified with those 
described. One undertakes to ratify and confirm a large part of the 
omissions of duty incident to the organization and management of 
the city government to which it applies. Ordinances by number, 
without other description, are accepted as wholesome for the com- 
munity amenable to that form of law, and ratified and approved, 
save that, by a variance between the title and the body of the act, 
ten, whose irregularity is by title promised a cure, are omitted and 
left to be healed two years hence. 

By one act you set apart one hundred and twenty-five thousand 
dollars for the payment of your expenses, and by another you 
increased your corps of employes by the addition of two clerks of 
committees. A superior court, constituted for Wayne county by 
the last General Assembly, is abolished, and you have dispensed 
with a part of our expensive machinery for the assessment of taxes 
in towns and cities. The act requiring that prisoners in jail be put 
at some useful work is valuable in our populous localities. The act 
permitting guardians to settle the estates of deceased wards is com- 
mendable, and I trust will lead to other needed reforms of that 
nature. You have enacted a few good and highly-important laws. 
Having agreed to seven of the proposed amendments to the consti- 
tution, you have provided for their submission to the people at an 
election to be held in April, 1880. You have passed a law appor- 
tioning the counties of the State for purposes of representation in 
the General Assembly which has met my entire approval as being 
just and fair to all affected by it. In my former communication I 
noted the growing disposition to impose ministerial duties upon the 
Governor in addition to those named in the constitution. By your 
acts changing the management of the benevolent institutions, the 



Hospital for the Insane, the Institution for the Education of the 
Deaf and Dumb, and the Institution for the Education of the Blind, 
and the Soldiers' Orphans' Home, (now merged with the newly 
created Asylum for Feeble-Minded Children) you have given to the 
Governor, under advice of the Senate, power to appoint the trustees. 
.Remembering how much of your time has been occupied by appeals 
for office when in your immediate gift, and the vain effort to deter- 
mine your right to elect, I am satisfied of their wisdom and of 
the propriety of extending the authority to include the management 
of the two prisons, which alone remain to threaten your peace of 
mind. 

I renew my recommendations on the subject of fees and salaries. 
It is expected that you will pass a law fixing the fees and salaries of 
your State, county and township officers, giving them a fair com- 
pensation for their services, making the law so plain that there can 
be no misconstruction of any of its parts. Such a law I shall 
cheerfully sanction. 

It is of great and pressing importance that you at once consider 
and pass a bill for an act making appropriations for the support of 
the State government during the two years from November 1, 1879. 
The act now in force was enacted in March, 1877, and was designed 
to include in itself and become a substitute for all existing laws 
authorizing the payment of money from the General Fund. It has 
been thus construed and administered. It lacks none of the force 
of law. By its terms it repealed the laws and fragments of laws 
then in force which had authorized unexpected drafts upon the 
treasury and limited the amounts and objects. Salaries are pro- 
vided for by it which had before been paid out of miscellaneous 
appropriations, and did not appear upon the face of the acts of 
appropriation. In this connection I may say that in making pro- 
vision for the administration of the office which I now have the 
honor to hold, you may not deal justly by its important and increas- 
ing business, when you adjust your appropriations to those who are 
for the time being in the service. The provision which you may 
make will apply to and affect the next administration of the office 
quite as much as the present incumbent. The system of business 
which prevails has been perfected by years of experience and pains- 
taking care, and deserves at least an examination before it is con- 
demned as useless, or degraded by being placed upon a level with 
branches of the public service of an entirely different character. 

The bill for an act making appropriations for specific objects 
deserves immediate consideration. An appropriation for improve- 



ments at the Southern Prison is a matter of great importance The 
addition to the buildings of the Hospital for the Insane, to be used 
as the " Department for Women/' has been erected during the past 
four years at a cost of six hundred thousand dollars, and awaits an 
appropriation to complete and furnish it for the accommodation of 
the hundreds who need its care and protection in their pitiable con- 
dition. 

I trust that you will not fail to make a sufficient appropriation — 
say sixty-two thousand dollars — to pay the indebtedness of the 
State Board of Agriculture. The State has already acquired an 
interest in its land to the amount of twenty -five thousand dollars; 
but it is only in the nature of a second mortgage. I recommend 
that you make the appropriation in order to save the State's interest 
as well as the State Board's, the State to be the owner in fee simple 
until such time as the property can be sold to advantage, and then, 
after reimbursing the State, should there be anything left, that it be 
given to the State Board. When, in 1855, the State University 
was in danger of losing its endowment by a judgment obtained by 
the trustees of Vincennes University against the State, defending 
for persons w r ho had purchased lands supposed to belong to it, the 
State very generously assumed the whole amount, being nearly 
seventy thousand dollars, and has paid it, with a large amount of 
interest on the bonds issued for the purpose. Now, if the State 
could afford to make a donation of that amount to one university, 
she can surely afford to appropriate the money required to save the 
property of the farmers and mechanics of the whole State, especially 
as the State will become the owner of the property. 

I sincerely hope that you will at once complete your consideration 
of the bill providing means to continue the work on the new State 
House*and enact it into a law. The slight disagreements as to the 
manner of raising the money can be speedily reconciled by a full 
and free consultation, when all shall have come to realize the advan- 
tages of an immediate prosecution of the work in a time so favor- 
able to permanence and cheapness. 

The subject of expert evidence, to which I called your attention 
in my former communication, has received an early and a marked 
illustration in the attempt of architects who testified before your 
committee of investigation into new State House matters to procure 
an allowance at the rate of twenty dollars per day for their attend- 
ance as witnesses, and that, too, after some of them had been afforded 
their education at the public expense. I renew and press upon you 



the recommendation that you remedy this evil, and that you put it 
beyond the power of courts to allow, or witnesses to demand and 
receive such unreasonable fees. 

I again urge that you repeal the law authorizing each county to 
send two students to each university free of charge, and that you 
require all students alike to pay a reasonable tuition fee. 

My recommendation upon the subject of executive clemency has 
been brought to your notice again by the printed copies of the 
biennial report for 1877 and 1878. I desire your careful and delib- 
erate judgment upon the facts thus fully communicated to you, and 
if in your opinion it is not wise to make the change authorized by 
the constitution, I will be glad if the care bestowed upon that 
branch of the business of this office may commend it to your 
approbation. 

As suggested in my proclamation, I believe that your session 
under this call should be brief, and I assume that it will be your 
pleasure to insure that desirable result by a prompt, diligent and 
harmonious disposition of the measures of public interest which I 
have enumerated. 

JAMES D. WILLIAMS. 

Governor's Office, March 11, 1879. 



BIENNIAL REPORT 



PAR DONS, 



Commutations and Reprieves, 



REMISSIONS OF FINES AND FORFEITURES 



GRANTED BT 



THE GOVERNOR OF INDIANA, 



DURING THE 



TWO YEARS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1878. 



TO TIHIIKS O-ZEUSnEZEaJLIj i.SSBMBIT. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL COMPANY, STATE PRINTERS. 

1879. 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, 

Legislative^ Department, 

Received by the General Assembly, convened in the Hall of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, in the Court House of Marion county, Friday, January 10, 1879, and; 
transmitted to the Secretary of State for publication, as ordered by each House. 

D. D. DALE, 

Secretary~of the Senate, 

4 T. C. MAYS, 
Assistant Clerk of the House of Representatives^ 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, 

Executive Department, Governor's Office, 

Thursday, January 9, 1879. 

To the General Assembly : 

By direction of the Governor, I have the honor to submit herewith a transcript 
of each decision made by him, and entered of record in this office, in granting par- 
dons, commutations and reprieves and remissions of fines and forfeitures during 
the two years ending December 31, 1878, thereby complying with the requirements 
of section seventeen of article five of the Constitution. An entry docket of appli- 
cations for executive clemency, under said section, commencing January 13, 1873, 
shows the number, eleven hundred and nineteen (1,119) during six years. A report 
of decisions made during 1873 and 1874 (q.v.) shows pardons (93 less 5) numbering 
eighty-eight (88); commutations, nine (9); reprieves, two (2), and remissions (52 
less 3) forty-nine (49) — making one hundred and forty-eight (148) in all. A report 
of decisions made during 1875 and 1876 (q.v.) shows, pardons, one hundred and 
eighteen (118) ; commutations (less 1 revoked), nine (9), and remissions, sixty- 
eight (68). The report for the years 1871 and 1872, although prepared for submis- 
sion January 10, 1873, with the message then delivered, seems not to have been 
communicated and published, but has remained on the files of this office, and is 
incorporated in this report. Since January 13, 1873, an official record has been 
kept in this office, showing each day's proceedings, in which entries of the several 
applications for clemency and the decisions made thereon are included. Upon the 
granting of an application, the papers have been listed and transmitted to the Sec- 
retary of State to be filed and preserved in his office as exhibits to his record, which 
constitutes a verbatim copy of the letters patent countersigned by him and issued 
ttnder the seal of the State to the execution defendant. Two hundred and eight 
(208) applications remain on the docket, after striking off those expired and dis- 
posed of. 

SAMUEL E. DOWNEY, Secretary. 



IN DEX. 



Ashley, Marion, 1877 ; pardon 13. 
Arnold, William, 1878; pardon 12. 
Albertson, Cyrus, 1878; pardon 26. 
Abrams, William J., 1878; pardon 60. 
Allen, Thomas, 1878; pardon 61. 
Armstrong, Lewis, 1877 ; reprieve 1. 

Allen county, 1877, pardons 36, 44, 55 ; 
1878, pardons 22, 31; 1878, remis- 
sion 4. I 

Burke, Thomas, 1877; pardon 7. 

Berg, William, 1877; pardon 33. 

Brendle, John P., 1877; pardon 34. 

Bechtol, Jacob, 1877; pardon 42. 

Bridges, James, 1877; pardon 52. 

Bean, John, 1877; pardon 68. 

Bowman, William H., 1878; pardon 4. 

Baird, Bobert. 1878; pardon 10. 

Baker, John, 1878; pardon 25. 

Baine, William, 1878; pardon 39. 

Bridges, William C, 1878 ; pardon 59. 

Blankenship, Chas. W., 1878 ; pardon 81. 

Bishop, Lewis, 1878; pardon 85. 

Boswell, Arthur C, 1878; commutation 
6. 

Ballard, John F., 1877; remission 3. 

Burchdorff, Charles, 1877; remission 14. 

Burk, James, 1877 ; remission 28. 

Bailey, William N., 1877; remission 31. 

Bolin, Willis, 1877 ; remission 32. 

Brownlee, Charles, 1877; remission 34. 

Boggs, Wayne, 1878; remission 5. 

Baker, Wm. H. and another, 1878; re- 
mission 21. 

Bartholomew county, 1877, pardons 9, 
51 ; 1878, pardons 39, 64. 



Boone county, 1877, pardons 34, 49, 53; 

1878, pardon 47 ; 1877, remission 36. 
Blackford county, 1877, pardon 54; 

1878, remission 16. 
Benton county, 1878, pardon 93 ; 1878, 

commutation 6. 

Carpenter, John, 1877 ; pardon 4. 
Cotterell, Thomas J, 1877 ; pardon 21. 
Craig, Marion N., 1877 ; pardon 26. 
Colley, Charles, 1877 ; pardon 29. 
Clark, James, 1877; pardon 55. 
Cunningham, William, 1877; pardon 53. 
Cline, John, 1878; pardon 1. 
Clark, Henry C, 1878 ; pardon 5. 
Convery, James, 1878 ; pardon 14. 
Curtis, Charles P., 1878; pardon 34. 
Carter, Morgan, 1878; pardon 35. 
Cahill, William, 1878; pardon 41. 
Caplinger, Samuel T., 1878 ; pardon 73. 
Crosley, Gilbert A., 1878 ; pardon 93. 
Convery, James, 1878 ; remission 3. 
Campbell, William, 1878; remission 31. 

Clarke county, 1877, pardon 10. 

Cass county, 1877, pardon 57; 1878, 

pardon 70. 
Clinton county, 1878, pardon 38. 
Clay county, 1878, remission 34. 

Dixon, William H., 1877; pardon 5. 
Davis, John B, 1877; pardon 19. 
Dear, Clarence, 1877 ; pardon 28. 
Douglass, John, 1877; pardon 31. 
Derringer, Henry F., 1877 ; pardon 67. 
De La Forer, Leon, 1878; pardon 19. 
Delany, Thomas, 1877 ; remission 4. 



Dunlap, J. A. and S. L., 1877; remis- 
sion 9. 
Douthitt, Joseph A., 1877; remission 35. 
Drake, James, 1878 ; remission 22. 
Dicks, Orlando B., 1878 ; remission 29. 

Decatur county, 1877, pardons 1, 5; 
1878, pardon 49 ; 1878, remission 27. 

Dearborn county, 1877, pardons 19, 41, 
46, 50; 1878, pardon 13; 1877, remis- 
sion 15; 1878, remission 2. 

Delaware county, 1877, pardons 43, 58. 

Evans, Allen, 1877, pardon 20. 
Eaglan, Silas, 1877 ; pardon 47. 
Ehlman, William, 1877 ; pardon 50. 
Edens, Henry W., 1878 ; pardon 47. 
Emory, Carson, 1878; pardon 91. 
Eakers, William, 1878 ; commutation 3. 

Elkhart county, 1877, pardons 48, 64. 

Foreman, Frank J., 1877 ; pardon 12. 
Fitch, Alvin H., 1877 ; pardon 35. 
Fowler, John, 1878; pardon 9. 
Fowler, Smith, 1878; pardon 13, remis- 
sion 2. 
Flynn, Frank, 1878; pardon 18. 
Foster, James, 1878 ; pardon 37. 
Furnish, William, 1878; pardon 82. 
Fox, Daniel, 1877; remission 22. 
Fowler, Smith N., 1878 ; remission 2. 
Fletcher, Milam D., 1878 ; remission 17. 

Floyd county, 1877, pardon 22; 1878, 

pardons 5, 54. 
Fulton county, A877, remission 7. 
Franklin county, 1878, remission 11. 

Goldsberry, Josiah, 1877; pardon 57. 
Graham, George, 1878 ; pardon 22. 
Grimes, Harrison, 1878; pardon 36. 
Grimes, George M., 1878; pardon 44. 
Griswold, Adam, 1878; pardon 68. 
Graves, Caesar, 1878 ; pardon 92. 
Good, James, 1878 ; pardon 65. 
Greer, Richard, 1877; commutation 2. 
Gillooly, Michael, 1878 ; commutation 2. 
Greenley, William Q., 1878; commuta- 
tion 4. 
Greenley, William Q., 1878; reprieve 1. 
Gray, Robert, 1877 ; remission 6. 
GrinestafTs sureties, 1877 ; remission 13. 



Godfrey, William, 1877; remission 18. 
Graham, George, 1878; remission 4. 
Gibson, La Fayette, 1878; remission 6. 
Gross, Sebastian, 1878 ; remission 15. 
Grimes, Richard, and another, 1878; 

remission 16. 
Goodrich, Mortimer K., 1878 ; remission 

21. 

Green county, 1877, pardon 15; 1878, 

pardon 56. 
Gibson county, 1878, pardon 24; 1877. 

remission 14. 
Grant county, 1878, pardon 27. 

Hardstine, Louis, 1877; pardon 10. 
Heinrich, Frank, 1877; pardon 30. 
Hill, Henry, 1877; pardon 39. 
Hood, Nelson F., 1877 ; pardon 41 . 
Harlan, John Charles, 1877; pardon 45. 
Hagerty, Charles, 1877; pardon 54. 
Hawkins, Charles, 1877 ; pardon 61. 
Hamlin, James G., 1877; pardon 66. 
Harris, Charles D., 1878; pardon 17. 
Hogan, Thomas E., 1878; pardon 21. 
Husted, Edward C, 1878; pardon 48. 
Harding, Israel, 1878; pardon 49. 
Hagel, Adam, 1878; pardon 54. 
Hunt, William, 1878; pardon 69. 
Hogarty, George, 1878; pardon 78. 
Hughes, John, 1877.; remission 10. 
Hill, Harrison, 1877; remission 16. 
Hannah, John W., 1877; remission 17. 
Houchins, C. and J., 1877; remission 19. 
Holloway, Lincoln, 1877; remission 20. 
Hausfurder, Albert, 1877; remission 23. 
Hays, Benjamin F., 1877; remission 36. 
Hazen, David, 1878; remission 7. 
Hindman, John W. W., 1878; remission 

19. 
Harmes, Ernst, 1878; remission 25. 

Hamilton county, 1877, pardons 7, 70; 

1878, remission 30. 
Huntington county, 1877, pardon 13; 

commutation, 1877, 1. 
Hendricks county, 1877, pardons 20, 31; 

1877, remission 10, 11, 33. 
Hancock county, 1877, pardon 52. 
Howard county, 1877, pardon 61; 1878; 

commutation 2. 
Henrv countv, 1877, remission 18. 



Isom, Nathaniel T., 1877; pardon 27. 
Imes, James, 1878; pardon 40. 
Irving, William L., 1878; pardon 67. 

Johnson, George W., 1877; pardon 37. 
Jinks, George W., 1877 ; pardon 40. 
Jackson John, 1877; pardon 58. 
Johnson Caleb, 1878; pardon 66. 
Jacobs, Louis, 1878 ; pardon 83. 
Johnson, William H. H., 1877; remis- 
sion 2. 
Jamison William G., 1877 ; remission 13. 
Jelley, Symmes M., 1877; remission 21. 

Johnson county, 1877, pardon 24; 1878, 
pardon 36, 77 ; 1877, remission 9, 22, 
30. 

Jefferson county, 1877, pardons 60, 66; 
1878, pardons 8, 25, 45, 46, 73; 1877, 
remission 23; 1878, remission 14, 20, 
24. 

Jay county, 1878, pardon 42. 

Jennings county, 1878, remission 28. 

Kelly, John, 1877 ; pardon 44. 
Killoren Thomas, 1877 ; pardon 49. 
Kerlin John, 1877 ; pardon 59. 
Kirchner, William, 1878 ; pardon 46. 
Kelley, John, 1878; pardon 62. 
Kurtz, William, 1878; pardon 80. 
King, George E., 1877; commutation 1. 
Kistler, John, 1878; reprieve 2. 
King, John R., 1878 ; remission 12. 
Klein, George, 1878 ; remission 24. 
Kennett William, 1878; remission 27. 

Knox county, 1877, pardons 16; 1878, 

pardon 14; 1878, remission 3. 
Kosciusko county, 1878, remission 5. 

Leonard, George C, 1877; pardon 36. 
Leipshitz, Casper, 1877; pardon 64. 
Lostetter, Rudolph, 1878; pardon 8. 
Levi, Abe, 1878 ; pardon 43. 
Lang, Charles, 1878; pardon 63. 
Livingston, Frank, 1878; pardon 79. 
Lee, Frank, 1878; pardon 95. 
Lanning, Nancy, 1878; remission 16. 
Lucas James, 1878; remission 34. 

Laporte county, 1877, pardons 21, 35; 
1878, pardon 18; 1877, remission 20. 



Lawrence county, 1877, pardon 26. 
Lagrange county, 1877, pardon 68. 
Lake county, 1878, remission 25. 

McNeil, James, 1877 ; pardon 2. 
McKinney, Leander B, 1877; pardon 9. 
Miller, John, 1877; pardon 17. 
McCorkle, James, 1877; pardon 32. 
Mcllwaine, James P., 1877; pardon 43. 
Moore, Frank, 1877; pardon 51. 
Megan, Oscar F., 1877 ; pardon 60. 
McCormick, William, 1877; pardon 63. 
Miller, Frederick, 1877; pardon 65. 
Mansfield, William R., 1878 ; pardon 2. 
Miles, George, 1878; pardon 23. 
Meissel, Henry F. A., 1878 ; pardon 29. 
Miller, Benedict, 1878; pardon 33. 
Morris, Willard, 1878; pardon 38. 
McBryant, William H., 1878 ; pardon 42. 
Meyers, Peter, 1878 ; pardon 53. 
Morgan, Samuel, 1878; pardon 55. 
Matthews, James, 1878 ; pardon 70. 
Mosier, Richard, 1878 ; pardon 71. 
McMillan, William H., 1878; pardon 72. 
McDaniels, Reed, 1878; pardon 88. 
Morrison, William J., 1877 ; remission 2. 
Marshall, John W., 1877 ; remission 8. 
McDonald, Albert, 1877; remission 24. 
Monjar, John L., 1877; remission 29. 
Merritt, Lear A., 1878; remission 11. 
McBride, James, 1878; remission 13. 
Morgan, Samuel, 1878 ; remission 18. 
Mayfield, Isaac, 1878; remission 20. 

Marion county, 1877, pardons 3, 4, 8, 29, 
30, 32, 33, 38, 47, 56, 59, 62, 65, 67; 
1878, pardons 4, 28, 34, 37, 40, 43, 51, 
52, 53, 59, 60, 66, 67, 78, 85, 86, 88, 90, 
96; 1877, commutations 2, 3, 4; 1878, 
commutations 1, 3, 4, 5; 1878, re- 
prieves 1, 2; 1877, remissions 2, 5, 6, 
8, 29 ; 1878, remissions 9, 13, 26. 

Montgomery county, 1877, pardon 14; 
1878, pardon 20. 

Morgan county, 1877, pardons 18, 63; 
1878, pardons 3, 69, 72,75; 1877, re- 
mission 31. 

Monroe county, 1877, pardon 25; 1878, 
pardon 17, 92. 

Miami county, 1878, pardons 55, 95; 
1878, remission 18. 

Martin county, 1878, remissions 17, 33. 



Nugent, John, 1877 ; pardon 16. 
Newman, Max, 1877 ; pardon 56. 

Ogan, James E., 1878 ; pardon 3. 
Ott, Charles, 1878; pardon 28. 
Olin, Eeynolds, 1878; pardon 58. 
Oliver, Harry, 1878 ; pardon 90. 
O'Neal, John I., 1877 ; remission 4. 

Owen county, 1877, pardons 23, 27; 

1878, remission 23. 
Orange county, 1878, pardon 89. 
Ohio county, 1877, remission 21; 1878, 

remission 21. 



Pio, Francis, 1877; pardon 6.' 
Patterson, Thomas, 1877 ; pardon 15. 
Phillips, James and Henry, 1877 ; par- 
don 18. 
Pierce, Omer T., 1877 ; pardon 46. 
Parsons, Jeanette, 1878 ; pardon 15. 
Plunkett, Peter, 1878 ; pardon 32. 
Percifield, John, 1878 ; pardon 64. 
Poe, John, 1878, pardon 75. 
Palmer, Orlando O, 1878; pardon 84. 
Prunk, Harry, 1878 ; commutation 5. 
Parker, Oscar O., 1878 ; remission 8. 
Pendleton, E. C. J., 1878 ; remission 9. 
Pryor, Watson W., 1878 ; remission 23. 
Porter, Abraham W., 1878 ; remission 33. 

Perry county, 1878, pardon 23; 1877, 

remission 32. 
Parke county, 1878, pardon 30. 
Posey county, 1878, pardon 65; 1877, 

remission 12, 25. 
Putnam county, 1878, pardon 81 ; 1877, 

remissions 16, 26 ; 1878, remissions 1, 

12, 29. 
Pike county, 1877, remission 19; 1878, 

remission 6, 8. 
Pulaski county, 1878, remission 7, 15. 

Richardson, Edward, 1877; pardon 11. 
Eainey, Thomas, 1877 ; pardon 38. 
Raymer, Amasa T., 1877 ; pardon 48. 
Robinson, Berry, 1877; pardon 62. 
Radcliff, Frank, 1878; pardon 6. 
Ready, Charles, 1878; pardon 57. 
Reese, Robert, 1878; pardon 77. 
Roche, Charles, 1877; commutation 3. 



Rudolph, Oliver P. M., 1877; commuta- 
tion 4. 
Ross, John A., 1877; remission 11. 
Eatjen, Charles J. B., 1877 ; remission 15. 
Eogers, Dudley, 1878; remission 1. 
Rose, William, 1878; remission 30. 

Eandolph county, 1877, pardons 39, 40 ; 

1878, pardon 21; 1877, remission 28. 
Eush county, 1877, remission 17. 

Shockey, Francis M., 1877 ; pardon 14. 

Schaaf, Henry, 1877 ; pardon 22. 

Seibert, Gilbert, 1877 ; pardon 24. 

Shell, James H., 1877 ; pardon 25. 

Shaw, Charles W., 1877 ; pardon 69. 

Sullivan, Mary Ann, 1878 ; pardon 16. 

Southerland, John, 1878 ; pardon 20. 

Smith, James, 1878 ; pardon 27. 

Shannon, William, 1878 ; pardon 45. 

Schaeffer, Christian, 1878 ; pardon 50. 

Smith, Hattie, 1878 ; pardon 51. 

Schwonenberger, Leonard J., 1878 ; par- 
don 52. 

Snyder, William W., 1878 ; pardon 56. 

Smith, Joseph, 1878 ; pardon 76. 

Stewart, David, 1878 ; pardon 86. 

Schaeffer, Frederick, 1878 ; pardon 87. 

Shingleton, Clarence D., 1878 ; pardon 
96. 

Sacre, William, 1877; remission 1. 

Stallings, Willis, 1877 ; remission 12. 

Stone, Nancy J., 1877 ; remission 26. 

Smith, Newton, 1877 ; remission 30. 

Sumner, John, 1877 ; remission 32. 

Sturgeon, Henry, 1878 ; remission 10. 

Shannon, William, 1878 ; remission 14. 

Shaffer, Adolphus, 1878; remission 26. 

Shafer, Nicholas, 1878 ; remission 28. 

Smith, Aurelius, 1878 ; remission 32. 

Spencer county, 1877, pardons 11, 69; 

1878, pardons 12, 35. 
St. Joseph county, 1877, pardon 37; 

1878, pardons 41, 62, 84, 91 ; respite, 

1877, 1; 1877, remission 24; 1878, 

remission 31. 
Shelby county, 1877, pardons 2, 6 ; 1878, 

pardon 33 ; 1877, remissions 1, 3, 27. 
Sullivan county, 1878, pardon 71 ; 1877, 

remission 34. 
Switzerland county, 1878, pardon 82; 

1877, remissions 4, 10. 



Thomas, William B., 1877; pardon 23. 
Towles, A. N. and E. P., 1877; remis- 
sion 33. 

Tippecanoe county, 1877, pardon 6; 
1878, pardons 7, 19, 61, 80; 1878, re- 
mission 22. 

Tipton county, 1877, pardon 45. 

Veatch, Lewis, 1878; commutation 1. 
Vantrump, Calvin, 1877; remission 7. 

Yigo county, 1877, pardon 2; 1878, par- 
dons 1, 15, 16, 29, 50, 57, 63, 74, 79, 87. 

Vanderburg county, 1877, pardons 12, 
28; 1878, pardons 10, 83, 94; 1877, 
remission 35; 1878, remission 32. 

Wiley, Michael, 1877; pardon 1. 
Wade, Samuel S., 1877 ; pardon 3. 



Ward, William H., 1877; pardon 8. 
Watson, John, 1878; pardon 7. 
Williamson, Albert E., 1878; pardon 11. 
Williams, David, 1878 ; pardon 24. 
Warren, Charles H., 1878; pardon 30. 
West, John, 1878; pardon 31. 
Woollen, Simpson, 1878; pardon 74. 
Watkins, William S., 1878; pardon 89. 
Webster, Alexander, 1878 ; pardon 94. 
Wilson, James, 1877 ; pardon 70. 
Wann, Cyrus L., 1877 ; remission 5. 
Weever, John B., 1877; remission 25. 

Wayne county, 1877, pardon 17; 1878, 
pardons 9, 26, 32, 44, 48, 68; 1878, re- 
mission 19. 

Wabash county, 1877, pardon 42. 

Warrick county, 1878, pardons 11, 58, 
76. 

Washington county, 1877, remission 13. 



PARDONS. 



SERIES OF 1877. 



I. 


Michael Wiley. 


28. 


Clarence Dear. 


2. 


James McNeil. 


29. 


Charles Colley. 


3. 


Samuel S. Wade. 


30. 


Frank Heinrich. 


4. 


John Carpenter. 


31. 


John Douglass. 


5. 


William H. Dixon. 


32. 


James McCorkle. 


6. 


Francis Pio. 


33. 


William Berg. 


7. 


Thomas Burke. 


34. 


John P. Brendle. 


8. 


William H. Ward. 


35. 


Alvin H. Fitch. 


9. 


Leander E. McKinney. 


36. 


George C. Leonard. 


10. 


Louis Hardstine. 


37. 


George W. Johnson. 


11. 


Edward Kichardson. 


38. 


Thomas Eainey. 


12. 


Frank J. Foreman. 


39. 


Henry Hill. 


13. 


Marion Ashley. 


40. 


George W. Jinks. 


14. 


Francis M. Shockey. 


41. 


Nelson F. Hood. 


15. 


Thomas Patterson. 


42. 


Jacob Bechtol. 


16. 


John Nugent. 


43. 


James P. Mcllwaine. 


17. 


John Miller. 


44. 


John Kelly. 


18. 


Jas. Phillips and Henry Phillips. 


45. 


John Charles Harlan. 


19. 


John R. Davis. 


46. 


Omer T. Pierce. 


20. 


Allen Evans. 


47. 


Silas Eaglan. 


21. 


Thomas J. Cotterell. 


48. 


Amasa T. Eaymer. 


22. 


Henry Schaaf. 


49. 


Thomas Killoren. 


23. 


William B. Thomas. 


50. 


William Ehlman. 


24. 


Gilbert Seibert. 


51. 


Frank Moore. 


25. 


James H. Schell. 


52. 


James Bridges. 


26. 


Marion N. Craig. 


53. 


William Cunningham 


27. 


Nathaniel T. Isom. 


54. 


Charles Hagerty. 



10 



55. James Clark. 

56. Max Newman. 
57; Josiah Goldsberry. 

58. John Jackson. 

59. John Kerlin. 

60. Oscar F. Megan. 

61. Charles Hawkins. 
€2. Berry Robinson. 



63. William McCormick. 

64. Casper Leipshitz. 

65. Frederick Miller. 

66. James G. Hamlin. 

67. Henry F. Derringer. 

68. John Bean. 

69. Charles W. Shaw. 

70. James Wilson. 



1. Michael Wiley, who was convicted in the Decatur Circuit Court of the 
crime of murder, and sentenced, on the 12th day of November, 1868, to be impris- 
oned for the term of his natural life. Pardoned January 4, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. This prisoner 
has been in prison more than eight years for murder. Both parties were intoxi- 
cated at the time. The prisoner has the best character for good conduct in the 
prison, and has given every evidence possible of reformation. The Physician and 
Warden of the prison make the following statement : 



Governor Hendricks : 



" Indiana State Prison South, 

Jeffersonville, December 11, 1876. 



Sir : — At your request I make the following statement of the physical condition 
of Michael Wiley. He has chronic hepatitis, and has been an inmate of the hospi- 
tal for the last six months. His constitution is much debilitated. 

Very respectfully, 

W. F. Sherrod, Physician." 

" There is not a better man than Michael Wiley confined in this prison. He is 
mild and gentle in his disposition, uniformly quiet and orderly in his deportment, 
receiving the good-will and sympathy of all the officers and free employes with 
whom he has been brought in contact. Sentenced for life by Decatur Circuit 

Court, November 12, 1868. 

Your obedient servant, 

Andrew J. Howard, Warden." 

The petitions for his pardon are signed by most worthy people of Decatur coun- 
ty, including the attorneys engaged in the prosecution, the residue of the bar, and 
professional and business men of Greensburg. In May, 1875, the Warden and all 
the officers of the prison united in the following recommendation of his pardon : 

"Indiana State Prison South, 

Jeffersonville, May 30, 1875. 

Hon. Thomas A. Hendricks, Governor of Indiana: 

We, the undersigned, officers and employes of this prison, respectfully call your 
attention to the case of Michael Wiley, who was convicted of murder in the Deca- 
tur county court, and sentenced, November 12, 1868, for life. In view of his ex- 



11 

cellent conduct as a prisoner ever since his sentence was received, and the faithful- 
ness and zeal with which he has served those placed over him, we would most earn- 
estly and respectfully ask*" that you exercise your pardoning power by setting him 
at liberty, feeling assured that by so doing you will give a good man his freedom, 
and bring credit to your own good judgment." 

I have received an unusually large number of letters on his behalf ; also per- 
gonal applications, and am satisfied that he is not a vicious or dangerous man, and 
that he is thoroughly repentant, and that his family of little children need his care, 
and that it will b& better for society to permit him to provide for his wife and chil- 
dren than to keep him longer in prison. Pardon granted. T. A. H. 

2. James McNeil, who was convicted in the Vigo Criminal Circuit Court of 
the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 8th day of December, 1874, to be 
imprisoned for the term of three years. Pardoned January 4, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The pris- 
oner was sentenced for three years for stealing a mule. He has now served more 
than two years. Eight months since, Judge Long, who tried the case, the prosecut- 
ing attorney, and a number of the citizens, including the party whose property was 
taken, presented a petition for his pardon, in which they make this statement of 
the case : 

"His Excellency, Thomas A. Hendricks, Governor of the State of Indiana: 

We, the undersigned, citizens of Clay county, do hereby respectfully petition 
your Excellency to grant to James McNeil a reprieve. The said McNeil was con- 
victed of grand larceny in the month of December last, in the Criminal Court of 
Vigo county, Indiana, and sentenced to the State's Prison for a term of three years. 
He was a resident of said county at the time of his conviction of said charge, and 
bore a good reputation for honesty and industry; and from what we can learn, we 
are fully satisfied that the alleged offence was the work of other bad, crafty and 
designing men, done while said McNeil was in a state of intoxication, and was not 
responsible for what was done. We sincerely believe that, in justice and right, he 
should be reprieved, and we invoke your Excellency in his behalf." 

When at the prison on the 16th ult., the Secretary of State and myself saw the 
prisoner, and heard his full statement, and the statement of the prison officers of 
his conduct, and we thought he should be pardoned. Pardon granted. 

T. A. H. 

3. Samuel S. Wade, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the loth day of February, 1876, 
to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned January 4, 1877, and re- 
leased from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. I 
saw the prisoner about two months since, and had a full conversation with him, 
and am of the opinion that he was led into the crime by others who only paid him 
wages. He does not appear vicious. He formerly lived at Gettysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, Hon. William McLean, the President Judge of that circuit, wrote me the 
following letter: 

"To his Excellency. Thomas A. Hendricks, Governor of Indiana: 

The undersigned begs leave to represent that he has been well acquainted with 
Samuel S. Wade, recently of Indianapolis, Indiana, now a convict in the peniten- 



12 

tiary of Indiana. Young Wade was born and raised in this place (Gettysburg,, 
Penn.), and I knew him here to be sober, honest and industrious in his habits, and 
that he was so reputed in the community. He lost a sister who contributed to the 
support of the mother and family, she having been shot in the battle of Gettys- 
burg, in July, 1863, whilst baking bread for the Union soldiers on Cemetery HilL 
Young Wade's mother is a widow, and poor and in distress from her son's situation. 
From my personal knowledge of him, and my acquaintance with his character, and 
from what I have heard of the offence of which he was convicted in Indianapolis, 
and the circumstances, I would but believe he was made the dupe of others far 
more designing and criminal. I also believe that he has already fully atoned for 
any part he may have had in the offence, and that the purposes of justice and pun- 
ishment have been fully subserved by what he has suffered up to this time. I 
would most respectfully submit that he would be a worthy and suitable object of 
executive clemency, and I therefore pray, in view of all the facts, that your Excel- 
lency will grant him a pardon. 

Very respectfully, 

William McLean, 

President Judge of 42d Judicial District of Pennsylvania. 
Gettysburg, Penn., September 7, 1876." 

Judge Buskirk, who tried the case, and the prosecuting attorney, make the fol- 
lowing statement: 

•' Hon. Thomas A. Hendricks, Governor of Indiana : 

Sir: — On the 15th day of February, 1876, Samuel Wade was sentenced to a 
term of two years' imprisonment in the State's Prison North on a plea of guilty. 
Wade was employed by another person to take from certain freight several lots of 
wheat, which proved to have been stolen. The evidence convinced me that Wade 
knew the wheat was stolen, and was a party to the larceny. Wade afterward testi- 
fied for the State in regard to the transaction against a person charged with the ' 
same crime. He is not a very bright person, and probably did not originate or 
plan the larceny. I think he has already been sufficiently punished for the offence, 
and recommend his pardon. I was Prosecuting Attorney of Marion Criminal 
Court at the time, and thus became acquainted with the facts. 

James M. Gropsey. 
January 2, 1877." 

" I endorse the above. 

E. C. Buskirk, 

Judge of Marion County Criminal Court." 
His conduct in prison has been good. Pardon granted. T. A. H. 

4. John Carpenter, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court of 
thee rime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 20th day of October, 1875, to be 
imprisoned for the term of four years. Pardoned January 4, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. This young 
man was raised in St. Louis and bore a good character. He came to Indianapolis 
to obtain work at his trade. He fell into bad company and was used as a tool by 
two others — experienced thieves — and was taken with the stolen property. He has 
been in prison two months above one year, and has been sufficiently punished. Hie 



13 

mother is a widow woman of excellent character, and seeks his pardon with great 
anxiety. The judge who tried the case recommends the pardon, together with 
other citizens. Pardon granted. T. A. H. 

5. William H. Dixon, who was convicted in the Decatur Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 1st day of May, 1876, to be imprisoned 
for the term of two years. Pardoned January 5, 1877, and released from confine- 
ment in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. This prisoner has 
been in the Prison South since May 1, 1876, upon a charge of stealing an old set of 
harness. I saw him when at the prison lately, and heard his account of the trans- 
action. He does not look or talk like a thief; and I think it probable that the 
larceny was really committed by his brother-in-law, who is in the prison for stealing 
the same harness. The prisoner's wife and mother have personally asked for his 
pardon. They are in most distressing condition. The mother is a feeble old lady 
of seventy-four years, and his wife has to support her and three little children, by 
labor. Judge Cullen and the prosecuting attorney, most of the bar of Decatur 
county, and many excellent citizens, ask his pardon. Pardon granted. 

T. A. H. 

6. Fkancis Pio, who was convicted in the Tippecanoe Criminal Circuit Court of 
the crime of murder, and sentenced, on the 6th day of November, 1867, to be impris- 
oned for the term of his natural life. Pardoned January 6, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. This prisoner 
has been in the Prison North more than nine years. I have examined his case with 
great care, and last year I refused to interfere. I have since conversed with the 
people of the State in which he lived, and found that he was not a bad or vicious 
person. He is rather a weak man, and especially in the quality that permits his 
conduct to be governed by another. He was living a quiet and honest life with his 
family, in Adams county, until about 1867 one La Ponge came into the neighbor- 
hood and lived at his father-in-law's house. La Ponge was a thoroughly bad man, 
possessed of remarkable skill and address. He obtained a wonderful influence over 
the prisoner; and by highly-wrought stories of speculation led him away from home 
to Cincinnati, and thence out to Lafayette. It was near that city that La Ponge 
killed a man, and because prisoner was with him at Lafayette he was found guilty, 
although he was not present at the homicide. I have great doubt of prisoner's 
guilt.. I think the jury had doubt — and therefore eleven of them have asked me to 
pardon him. In no case that I have examined have so many of a man's neighbors 
petitioned for his pardon. If guilty at all, I am entirely satisfied that it was a case 
of absolute control of a bad will over a feeble mind. La Ponge is in prison for 
life. Pardon granted. T. A. H. 

7. Thomas Burke, who was convicted in the Hamilton Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 24th day of November, 1875, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned January 6, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The fol- 
lowing statement of the case is made by Lieutenant-Governor Sexton, officers of 
Rush county and respectable citizens : 

"To his Excellency, Thomas A. Hendricks, Governor of the State of Indiana : 

We, the undersigned, citizens of Push and Fayette counties, in said State, would 
respectfully represent to your Excellency, that Thomas Burke (No. 2) is now con- 



14 

fined in the Northern Prison of said State on a conviction of grand larceny by the 
Hamilton Circuit Court. That he was convicted something over one year ago on 
his own confession and sentenced to said prison for two (2) years by Judge Craven. 
We learn that his health is bad, being for the greater part of the time wholly 
unable to labor. We also understand that his conduct since his imprisonment has 
been most excellent, requiring no discipline whatever. We also learn and believe 
that the offence with which he was charged was his first offence; and that being 
among strangers, he was induced to put in a plea of guilty when it was exceedingly 
doubtful if he could have been convicted. He formerly lived on the east line of 
this (Rush) county, and was most respectable, and in our judgment we think him 
entirely worthy of Executive clemency. November 29, 1876." 

Pardon granted. T. A. H. 

8. William H. Ward, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of manslaughter, and sentenced, on the first day of July, 1869, 
to be imprisoned for the term of seventeen years. Pardoned January 8, 1877. 
Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner has now been in the Prison North seven 
and one-half years. I think that sufficient punishment upon the facts of the case. 
Judge Chapman, who tried the case, says: 

"Indianapolis, December 31, 1872. 
Hon. Conrad Baker, Governor of Indiana: 

Sir: — In June, 1869, according to my present recollection, William H. Ward was 
tried before me, as Judge of the Marion Criminal Circuit Court, on a charge of mur- 
der for killing one John A. Bertin. He was found guilty of manslaughter, and sen- 
tenced by the jury to be imprisoned in the State Prison for seventeen years. I 
thought at the time that the sentence was one of unmerited severity ; but, as I had 
already given the defendant one new trial, and believed the homicide to amount to 
manslaughter, though of mild degree, I did not feel at liberty to grant hiin another 
trial simply on the ground that in my judgment he had been sentenced to undergo 
excessive punishment. 

Ward, by his appearance and his deportment during the trials, inspired me with 
a favorable impression; and these facts, together with the circumstances attending 
the homicide, as shown by the evidence, led me to believe that the difficulty was 
urged upon him by the deceased, and that had Ward shown a stronger disposition 
to avoid it the killing would have been justifiable as having been done in- self- 
defense. 

In consideration of these facts, and in view of the period of imprisonment through 
which Ward has already passed, I am strongly of the opinion that this is a case in 
which the pardoning power may well be exercised, and therefore respectfully recom- 
mend Ward to executive clemency. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Geo. H. Chapman." 

In another letter he says : 

"Indianapolis, August 14, 1874. 

To his Excellency, Hon. T. A. Hendricks, Governor of Indiana: 

Sir: — W. H. Ward, who is now undergoing sentence in the State Prison North, 
and which sentence was imposed upon him by a jury in a certain trial which was had 
in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court whilst I was the judge of that court, is, I 
think, deserving of executive clemency. If I mistake not, I have heretofore ad- 



15 

dressed a communication to the executive office in his behalf. I know I regarded 
the sentence which was imposed upon him as being more than justly severe, and 
promised Ward at the time I passed judgment upon him that I would, at the 
proper time, ask the Governor to pardon him, if his conduct in the prison deserved 
such an act of favor. I am clear in my own mind that Ward has been imprisoned 
now as long as he should be, and as long, or longer, as he should have been sen- 
tenced. 

I am, very truly, your obedient servant, 

George H. Chapman." 
The officers of the prison make the following statement and recommendation: 

" Michigan City, December 22, 1876. 
To his Excellency, Thomas A. Hendricks, Indianapolis: 

We, as officers of the State Prison, would cheerfully recommend to your favor- 
able consideration, as a fit subject for the exercise of executive clemency, William 
H. Ward, a prisoner confined in this prison. He was sentenced, July 1, 1869, in 
the Marion Coanty Criminal Court for the crime of murder for the term of seven- 
teen years. His conduct has been good. He has served seven and a half years, 
and we are of the opinion, if pardoned, judging from his record here, will make a 

good citizen hereafter. 

Charles Matne, Warden. 

A. C. Hall, Deputy Warden. 

John H. Bowes, Clerk. 

George McDowell, Steward." 

The Warden has personally appealed to me to pardon the prisoner, upon the 
ground that he is the most exemplary prisoner in his charge, and the effect would 
be to promote good prison discipline. Pardon granted. T. A. H. 

9. Leander B. McKjnney, who was convicted in the Bartholomew Circuit 
Court of the crime of murder, and sentenced, on the 4th day of June, 18*)7, to be 
imprisoned for the term of his natural life. Pardoned January 8, 1877, and re- 
leased from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. This 
prisoner has now been in the Prison South nearly twenty years. For many 
years his conduct has been good. He has been allowed entire liberty in and about 
the prison, and has not, in any case, violated his parole or betrayed the confidence 
of the officers. He has had constant opportunities to obtain intoxicating liquors, 
but has remained sober. The officers of the prison say that prison life has im- 
paired his physical and mental vigor, and that there is danger that his mind will 
become seriously impaired if kept longer in prison. I do not think it possible for 
him to give better evidence of his reformation than he has given. Some years since 
opposition was made to his pardon, but that opposition has nearly altogether disap- 
peared. The applications by prominent citizens for his pardon, made in letters 
and personally, have been more numerous and earnest than in the case of any 
other prisoner. At one time his father-in-law expressed an unwillingness to his 
pardon ; but now the entire family unite in a letter asking that he be pardoned. I 
grant the pardon because he has now suffered a long and terrible punishment, and 
given all the evidence of reformation that, under his circumstances, is possible* 
Pardon granted. T. A. H. 



16 

10. Louis Hardstine, who was convicted in the Clark Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 9th day of November, 1872, to be im- 
prisoned for the term of five years. Pardoned January 8, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor . This prisoner 
was sentenced to five years for stealing some old brass from the railroad yards. The 
brass was of small value, and the punishment was too severe. He has now served 
above four years, which 1 think excessive. His family requires his care. His prison 
conduct has been good. Judge Dunham, who tried the case, recommends his par- 
don; also the prosecuting attorney. Pardon granted. T. A. H. 

11. Edwakd Kichardson, who was convicted in the Spencer Circuit Court of 
the crime of perjury, and sentenced, on the 25th day of October, 1876, to be impris- 
oned for the term of six months. Pardoned February 24, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the jail of Spencer county. Decision: By the Governor. The defend- 
ant was fined ten dollars and sentenced to imprisonment in the county jail for a 
period of six months. He has now served four months of his term, and, by my 
requirement, has procured the judgment to be replevied, to the approval of the clerk 
of the court. I am asked by the county officers and other citizens to release him 
from imprisonment for the residue of the term, for the reasons that he has been 
sufficiently punished for his offense; that further imprisonment can result in no 
further good as to his reformation, and that his release will relieve the county of a 
great and unnecessary expense. The sheriff of the county has called in person to 
urge a pardon. I think it should now be granted, and it is so ordered. 

J. D. W. 

12. Frank J. Foreman, who was convicted in the Vanderburg Criminal 
Circuit Court of the crime of seduction, and sentenced, on the 30th day of April, 

• 1874, to be imprisoned for the term of three years. Pardoned March 16, 1877, and 
his right of suffrage as a citizen of the State of Indiana remitted unto him. 
Decision: By the Governor. The defendant, upon conviction, was sentenced to three 
years' imprisonment, and to pay a fine of five hundred dollars. His application for 
a pardon was considered by my predecessor, August 21, 1874, and refused. He has 
now been* released from prison because of good conduct, having gained seventy-two 
days' good time under the act of 1861. I am asked by the mayor and recorder of 
Evansville to grant a pardon, that he may be relieved of his disfranchisement- 
They, and other citizens, are of opinion, and state to me, that the defendant was 
unjustly convicted, and that, having endured the punishment imposed, he has 
returned to Evansville and gone into business, and gives promise of good behavior 
hereafter. Fearing that his service of the term of imprisonment does not relieve 
him of the disability imposed by the sentence, he desires a pardon, and, in recogni- 
tion of his good conduct, it seems to me proper that it be granted, and it is so 
ordered. J. D. W. 

13. Marion Ashley, who was convicted in the Huntington Circuit Court of the 
crime of arson, and sentenced, on the 26th day of October, 1875, to be imprisoned 
for the term of two years. Pardoned March 29, 1877, and released from confine- 
ment in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. The prisoner has 
now served more than seventeen months and has conducted himself well in prison. 
His pardon is asked by eleven jurors, the twelfth being dead ; the judge, the prose- 
cuting attorney and by citizens of Huntington county. Judge Slack, in a letter 
written last November, says : 



17 

"Huntington, Inc., November 9, 1876. 
Governor Thomas A. Hendricks : 

Dear Sir: — At the October term of this court, 1875, Marion Ashley, then a lad 
of eighteen years, was convicted of the crime of arson, and sentenced to the State 
prison for the period of two years, one year of which has expired. The proof dis- 
closed the fact that lie was intoxicated at the time. The building did not burn 
more than to merely take fire, was at once discovered and extinguished, was done 
one Sunday evening just as the people were going -to church. His father is a 
cripple, having had one limb amputated ; and Marion is his principal reliance. 
Up to the time of this offence being charged, he maintained a good character, 
except a little wildness incident to youth. In view of all the facts and the proba- 
bility that his release will result in more good to him than his continued confine- 
ment until the end of his term, I would respectfully recommend his pardon. 

Very respectfully yours, 

Jas. R. Slack, 

Judge 28th Judicial Circuit." 

He has also fully stated the case to me in person. In view of the prisoner's youth 
at the time of committing the crime, his good conduct, his probable reformation 
and his service of a large portion of his term, I deem it proper to comply with the 
request of the petitioners by granting a pardon, and it is so ordered. 

J. D. W. 

14. Francis M. Shockey, who was convicted in the Montgomery Circuit 
Court of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 24th day of November, 
1875, to be imprisoned for the term of three years. Pardoned March 31, 187,7, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision. : By the Governor. 
The convict has served nearly one-half of his term and has conducted himself well 
in prison. His pardon is recommended by a majority of the jury, the prosecuting 
attorney, and many petitioners, citizens of Montgomery county, including the 
county officers. Caleb Davis, from whom the cattle were stolen, says : " I believe 
the punishment for the one year may be enough ; that his reform, which is all we 
want, may as likely (even more so) be gained by his free pardon now as to stay the 
whole time. In view of all the facts I am willing to recommend his pardon and 
shall feel glad that the young man may be restored to his sorrowing parents." A 
petition filed in support of the application contains the following statement of 
facts : 

"On or about the day of September, 1875, Frank Shockey came to Craw- 

fordsville, got under the influence of strong drink, hired a horse in the city to go to 
Brownsvalley, in said county, where he had several relations living. Caleb Davis, 
a farmer, lived near by, and said Shockey, instead of going to his relations, went 
into the cattle pastures of said Davis, in said county, turned out six head of cattle 
and drove them to Crawfordsville, along a public highway, stopped them near the 
city, got a boy to watch them, came to the city, returned the horse he had hired, 
and then tried to sell the cattle to the butchers, but did not do so, until the owner 
of the cattle (Caleb Davis) cania_.and reclaimed the cattle, and had the said Shockey 
arrested on a charge of grand larceny, and lodged him in jail in default of bail. It 
was shown on the trial that this was his first offense, and his character for honesty 
and integrity had been good up to the time of the offense. The above is the sub- 
stance of the facts in the case as sworn to on the trial. A plea of 'not guilty' was 

2 Pardons. 



18 

entered, but the counsel for defendant, when the evidence was in, admitted to the 
court and jury that a case had been made out in behalf of the State, and the case 
went to the jury, with result as above stated." 

The judge of the court certifies that this is the substance of the evidence in the 
case, but makes no recommendation. The prisoner is young, and this is said to 
have been his first offense. His parents, who now live in Illinois, purpose removing 
immediately to a western home, and desire to take their son with them. In the 
hope that his reformation has been accomplished by the punishment already suf- 
fered, I will pardon him. Pardon granted. J. D. W. 

15. Thomas Patterson, who was convicted in the Greene Circuit Court of the 
crime of assault and battery, and sentenced, on the 28th day of March, 1877, to 
be imprisoned for the term of six months. Pardoned April 14, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the jail of Greene county. Decision: By the Governor. The 
defendant was arrested for assault and battery with intent to murder, and was put 
upon his trial by a jury, who returned a verdict of guilty of assault and battery, 
and fixed his punishment at a fine of one hundred dollars and six months' impris- 
onment in the county jail. A judgment was rendered in accordance with the 
verdict, and the prisoner was remanded to the custody of the sheriff for the execu- 
tion of the sentence. I am asked by a large number of citizens of Greene county to 
grant him a pardon. In their petition they say "That said Thomas Patterson is 
an old man, and for several years past has been in feeble health; that said alleged 
assault and battery grew out of a difficulty between the accused and an able-bodied, 
stout young man, greatly the superior of said Thomas Patterson in physical strength. 
Your petitioners further state that, owing to the advanced age and feeble health 
of said Thomas Patterson, confinement in the county jail for the period of said 
sentence, in our opinion, will result in iris death. Your petitioners also represent 
that said Thomas Patterson is a peaceably disposed citizen, and for twenty-one 
years was a justice of the peace in the township in which he resides." 

Four other physicians of the county concur in the following statement: 

"This is to certify that I have been the family physician of Thomas Patterson 
in the last ten years. During the last two years he has been feeble from age and 
the effects of disease, but more feeble during the last year than ever before, for dur- 
ing a great portion of that time he has been sick and under medical treatment. He 
has suffered from chronic intermittent fever and congestion of the liver and spleen? 
more especially the latter, for so long that his nutrition is seriously impaired. 
Naturally, he is rather of feeble constitution, and his resistance to the ravages 
of disease and age is very feeble. The said Patterson is now confined in the 
county jail, and is to remain there a period of six months. Now, from his age, 
debility, etc., as above described, I feel confident that the confinement will be a 
severe blow to his remaining strength, and in all probability will cost his life. 

J. W. Gray, M. D." 

The county officers, the prosecuting attorney, and seven jurors, with members of 
the bar and other citizens, join in a petition recommending that I relieve the 
defendant from imprisonment on payment of his fine. The sheriff, in a letter, says 
the prisoner "is near seventy years old, and very feeble, and to lay in jail six 
months would kill him." 

Upon full consideration of the case, when submitted, I decided that, upon pay- 
ment of the fine, I would release him from confinement. The clerk has certified to 
me that payment has been made as required, and a pardon is now granted. 

J. D. W. 



19 

16. John Nugent, who was convicted in the Knox Circuit Court of the crime 
of assault and battery with intent to murder, and sentenced, on the 29th day of 
May, 1875, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned April 14, 1877, 
and released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. 
The defendant has now served more than twenty-two months of his term. His 
pardon is recommended by Judge Malott and other citizens of Knox county, who 
give it as their opinion that he has been sufficiently punished. He will soon be 
entitled to a discharge under the statute giving good time and I grant a pardon now 
that he may enter society with a clear record and thus have an incentive to good 
conduct hereafter. J. D. W. 

17. John Miller, who was convicted in the Wayne Circuit Court of the crime 
■of burglary and sentenced, on the 23d day of September, 1876, .to be imprisoned for 
the term of two years. Pardoned April 16, 1877, and released from confinement 
in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. There seems to have been 
a mistake by the principal prosecuting witness in identifying the defendant as the 
person whom she saw in the act of entering her dwelling house and, as the convic- 
tion rested mainly upon her evidence, it is urged before me that the prisoner is being 
punished for the crime of another. On Sunday morning of June 18, 1876, between 
three and four o'clock, Mrs. John H. Lukens, in Richmond, was awakened by the 
noise of some one working at the window-blind of her room, and shortly after- 
ward saw half the body of a man standing outside and leaning in the window. 
She says she was so paralyzed by fear that she could not cry out, nor move ; that 
she endeavored to touch her husband but could not. The man looked at her 
awhile and disappeared. She recognized the defendant as the person, and he was 
arrested, held to bail, indicted, tried, convicted and sentenced upon her somewhat 
uncertain identification of the person whom she saw. I have been furnished a 
large number of sworn statements which go far to prove the defendant's innocence 
and ignorance of the criminal offence charged and that another young man has 
confessed the burglary and fled the State. A large number of citizens, including 
eighteen lawyers and the county officers of Wayne county, have signed petitions 
asking me to grant a pardon. Five jurors in writing represent to me "that the only 
fact of guilt proven against the defendant was the testimony of Mrs. Lukens, who 
swore that she never saw the defendant before, but identified him as the person the 
upper part of whose body and face she saw in the window while she was in bed 
with her husband about three or four o'clock in the morning. That a single jet of 
gas was burning somewhat turned down, but giving light enough to see. That she 
was startled from her sleep and paralyzed with fear so much she could not even 
move her hand to touch her husband; said the person very soon jumped down on 
the ground from a chair on which he was standing on the outside and disappeared. 
She afterwards when passing along the street saw the defendant and identified him 
as being the same person in appearance and features sbe had seen at her house." 
The prosecuting witnesses have made the following recommendation: "To His 
Excellency, Governor James Williams: The unlersigned respectfully represent to 
your Excellency, that they were the prosecuting witnesses on whose testimony, John 
Miller w.is convicted of burglary in their house, at the September term, 1876, of 
the Wayne Circuit Court, Wayne county, Indiana. Believing that the ends of 
justice have already been satisfied, they cheerfully and freely join in the petitions 
heretofore presented, praying that he m.iy be pardoned. John H. Lukens, E. A. 
Lukens." In a case of so much doubt, I do not feel justified in refusing so urgent 
an application and a pardon will therefore issue to the prisoner. J. D. W. 



20 

18. James Phillips and Henry Phiielips, who were convicted in the- 
Morgan Circuit Court of the crime of burglary, and sentenced, on the 10th day of 
December, 1875, to be imprisoned each for the term of two years. Pardoned April 
19, 1877, and released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By 
the Governor. On February 18, 1876, a notice of protest was received from Messrs. 
Shirley and Robinson, of counsel for a large number of citizens of Morgan county, 
and filed, "to be considered with any petition that may be presented." On the 3d 
of January last, a petition was presented, signed by the sheriff, clerk and auditor of 
the county, and the judge and prosecuting attorney, in which they ask that I "right a® 
far as possible, a great wrong, and pardon the defendants;" and say "that at the 
time of said conviction there were grave doubts of -the guilt of said defendants, and 
that subsequent and repeated declarations of the said prosecuting witness, Snoddy,. 
made to different persons, under circumstances most favorable to elicit from him 
the truth, and sworn to by the parties in whose presence they were made, materially 
strengthen those original doubts, and makes it almost morally certain that defend- 
ants were not guilty as charged in said indictment, but that other and unknown 
parties are the guilty ones, personally known to the said Snoddy, he confessing as 
to some of them, and substantially admitting his own complicity in said robbery.'" 

The prosecuting attorney says: 

"I have never been satisfied with the conviction of the Phillips boys." 

A large number of affidavits and a full statement of the evidence accompany 
the petition. Milton Phillips, a brother of defendants, has filed a sworn statement, 
in which he says that when visiting his brothers, June 25, 1876, Snoddy admitted, 
in substance, the following : 

"I am going to lead a different life, and want to make things right with your 
brothers. They are here suffering innocently. I swore falsely against them when 
they was [were] on trial. The reason I did so is, James Phillips had arrested my 
pardner, and it made me mad, and I did it through spite. I would now freely 
swear differently, and give an affidavits that effect, but I know I would be pun- 
ished for it." 

I have been furnished the following reliable statement: 

"I was of counsel for Henry and James Phillips upon a charge of robbing Mr. 
Jefferson Wooden. I had an abiding confidence then, as I have now, of their inno- 
cence of the charge. Some time last summer I had occasion to visit Jeffersonville, 
and while there I visited the Southern prison. While there I interviewed several 
of the prisoners, among others several of those whose sworn statements accompany 
this application, and their statements to me were substantially as given here.^ I 
may further state that they impressed me as honest, truthful men, an impression 
confirmed by the officers of the prison. I then had a short interview, at his own 
Tequest, with Henry Snoddy. After a few minutes' talk about other matters, he 
asked me if I had seen the Phillips boys. I told him I had, and said, ' They ought 
not to be here, Henry.' He said he knew they ought not. I said, 'You did the 
boys a great wrong on the trial.' He said he knew he did, for they were not the 
guilty parties, that he would do anything he could to get them out of there that 
wouldn't endanger him. I told him the only way he could do them any good 
would be to make a full, frank, sworn statement of the facts of their innocence. 
He said he couldn't do that, for if he did he would be indicted for perjury and sent 
back to prison, and, God knows, he never wanted to get into that place again. ^ I 
told him it would doubtless involve him in further trouble, but he ought to be will- 



21 

ihg to do right at any cost; that I was satisfied such a statement from him would 
exonerate the boys and obtain their release. At the conclusion of the interview he 
said he couldn't safely make such a statement now, and that he would have to 
;stand by what he had sworn on the trial. With that we parted. 
The above statement is substantially correct, as I verily believe. 

Geo. W. Grubbs." 

Hon. John C. Eobinson, present judge of the court, and the writer of the notice 
of protest, has written me a letter of date March 15, ult., in which he says he was 
•employed as assistant prosecutor, and that " had it not been for the testimony of 
Snoddy and Whitson, the defendants would doubtless have been acquitted." He 
-concludes as follows: 

"Upon the testimony, as the case was submitted to the jury, they might well 
have found either way. Of what declarations and recantations said witnesses have 
made since the convictions, I have no knowledge ; but if they have done and said 
■enough to destroy or materially impair their testimony upon the trial, it would 
-certainly raise a strong presumption of the defendants' innocence, and would present 
a case in which I should think the pardoning power of the Governor should be 
■exercised, and in such a case I should most respectfully recommend your Excel- 
lency to pardon said defendants. 

Yours truly, 

John C. Eobinson." 

I have examined this application with much care, both upon the case as made 
by the papers and when at the Prison recently, and am of opinion that the defend- 
ants ought not longer to be deprived of their liberty. J. D. W. 

19. John E. Davis, who was convicted in the Dearborn Circuit Court of the 
crime of arson, and sentenced on the 29th day of October, 1874, to be imprisoned 
for the term of five years. Pardoned April 19, 1877, and released from confinement 
In the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. One year ago a remonstrance 
was received from the party whose barn was burned, and other citizens of Dearborn 
county, including ten jurors. A petition has since been presented asking a pardon 
for the reasons that there is doubt as to the guilt of the defendant, and that he is 
not of strong mind, and has been for years " afflicted with a large wen on his neck 
which will doubtless sooner or later terminate his life." 

I gain from a privileged communication, made to my predecessor in April last, 
the following recommendation: 

" I happen to know somewhat of Mr. Davis, who had a negative character, with 
inclination preponderating toward good, a man perhaps sixty years of age, bearing 
and enduring a parasite on one side of his head — a wen, seemingly as large as the 
head of a three-year old child. I happen to know something of the testimony on 
which he was convicted, and the means used to secure it, and I was at the time not 
•satisfied that such would have led me to a conclusion of his guilt, beyond that rea- 
sonable doubt which should exist in the mind of the juror having the case sub 
judice; but be that now out of the way, it does seem that a longer restraint of the 
liberty of an old man, with so terrible an affliction as he is compelled to endure 
for life, would not be consonant to the purposes of the law in the prevention of 
such offenses, and that, were I the Executive, and knew the facts and the man as I 
■do now, my clemency would be exercised ; and, with both petition and remonstrance 
before you, and an autopsy of the living J. E. Davis, I am constrained to believe 
that you would act as I have indicated I would." 



22 

Mr. Senator Givan in a letter asking favorable consideration says: "Mi* 
Davis is an invalid, and has been for years past. At the time of his conviction I 
thought the evidence was not sumcfent but the jury returned a verdict and the 
court refused to disturb the finding. I hope you will give his case a careful con- 
sideration and grant him a pardon if you find upon examination that he is entitled 
to executive clemency." Upon a recent visit to the prison, I was furnished a 
written recommendation, signed by nine persons acting as religious teachers of the 
convicts, in which they say : " We have been acquainted with Mr. Davis since, and 
during his incarceration in the prison and are fully satisfied that he is an honest,, 
upright and faithful christian man, and we further say, that we believe from the 
evidence we have that Mr. Davis is wholly an innocent man and suffering for the 
deeds of others. We hope, Governor, that you will kindly consider his case and 
soon restore him to liberty. We ask this of you in the name of justice and right." 
My observation and the recommendations of the prison officers confirm my opinion 
that in a case of so much doubt the prisoner should not longer be held in confine- 
ment. The wen on his neck has grown to be so large that it requires support from 
his hand when he sits, stands or walks. His discharge is due alike to himself and 
the prison officers and it will be granted. J. D. W. 

20. Allen Evans, who was convicted in the Hendricks Circuit Court for the 
crime of grand larceny and sentenced, on the thirteenth day of March, 1876, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned April 24, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The defendant 
has served more than one-half of his term and has conducted himself well in prison. 
A petition signed by the prosecuting witness, four of the county officers, and other 
citizens of Hendricks county, was received October 25th last. It shows that the 
conviction was upon a plea of guilty : "that the said Allen Evans was only about 
twenty years of age at the time this charge was brought against him ; that he has 
lived all his life in Hendricks county ; that the father of the said Evans has been 
for a long time addicted to the excessive use of intoxicating drinks; that he is also 
a man of very violent temper and when inflamed with liquor would often abuse 
and cruelly beat his son in an unmerciful and wicked manner; that this drunken 
condition of the father and the cruel treatment of his son was of almost daily occur- 
rence ; that the son was driven from home, by this cruel treatment of the father- 
when a mere child, and was compelled to live with strangers wherever he could 
find employment." 

Hon. Livingston Howland, judge of the court, joins in the prayer for par- 
don. My predecessor made the following endorsement: "Under the circum- 
stances and because of the age of the prisoner, I think it will be proper to pardon 
him at the expiration of one year, provided his conduct in prison be good." A 
gentleman familiar with the case writes as follows: "I know that the lad has had 
a miserable life at home, never receiving any encouragement from his father to try 
to do right. I believe that if the young man were pardoned it would impress him 
favorably, so that with the further encouragement of his mother and her friends, 
he might be led to reform and become a good citizen. His mother belongs to one 
of our most respectable families, and his pardon, under the circumstances, would 
be regarded by those who are acquainted with the facts, as a very proper and just 
act on the part of your Excellency." The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

21. Thomas J. Cottekell, who was convicted in the Laporte Circuit Court of 
the crime of assault and battery with intent to kill, and sentenced, on the 19th day 
ef November, 1875, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned April 24,. 



23 

1877, and released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the 
Governor. The act for which the prisoner was convicted was committed upon the 
person of his personal friend, Carlos Sherman, while in a drunken quarrel. The 
prosecuting witness, nine jurors, and several county officers and citizens of Laporte 
and St. Joseph county, now ask his pardon, for the reason that, in their opinion he 
has been sufficiently punished. 

The judge of the court says of the prisoner: 

'* I have known him all his life. His father was the first sheriff of this county, 
and one of the best of men. This son is a kind and generous fellow when not under 
the influence of intoxicating drink ; but when under its influence, the devil takes 
possession of him, and he is not only ready to fight his own fights, but any that may 
offer. His father is dead, and his mother is very anxious to have him pardoned. 
He promises never to drink any more. If he would keep his promise, I am satisfied 
no one would be disturbed by him, and it would be safe to set him at large. It 
would be a great favor to his mother to pardon him out. I think the community, 
if assured that he would be always hereafter a sober man, would be satisfied at his 
pardon, but nothing short of a confident belief that his promise would be kept 
would be satisfactory." 

The prosecuting attorney says : 

" I can not indorse the character of Cotterell as being that of a high-minded and 
exemplary citizen, but I think his fourteen months' imprisonment and pardon now, 
before the expiration of his term, would probably make him a better citizen in 
future than if he is required to stay in prison until the expiration of his sentence. 
The application is also made on behalf of Cotterell's mother. She is a very worthy 
woman, and deserving of great sympathy. Cotterell has also two young children 
depending on him for support, and they no doubt suffer from his enforced absence 
from them." 

The aged mother of the convict is about to die, and on this account it is desired 
by friends of the family that the prisoner be at home. His conduct is reported 
good, and, upon assurance of continued good behavior, he is released. 

J. D. W. 

22. Henry Schaaf, who was convicted in the Floyd Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of burglary and sentenced, on the twelfth day of July, 1875, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned April 24, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. Upon sub- 
mission of this application to my predecessor, January 6, 1877, he said : " I regret 
that I cannot examine this case. The case as stated by Mr. Kelso merits favorable 
consideration." The petition is signed by the judge of the court, the deputy pros- 
ecuting attorney at the time of conviction, the county officers of Floyd county, the 
prosecuting witness and other citizens, and urges a pardon for the reasons that the 
defendant was induced to commit the crime while under the influence of liquor, by 
a noted desperado who has escaped punishment ; his behavior has been good and 
he gives evidence of reformation. The warden recommends as follows : " It having 
been brought to my notice that the friends of Henry Schaaf, a convict in the State 
Prison South, are endeavoring to secure a pardon for him, I ask permission to join 
them in the representation that he is worthy of Executive clemency. The officers 
of the prison have received valuable assistance from him in regard to matters per- 
taining to prison discipline. He has been an excellent prisoner. I believe that 



24 

his pardon would be promotive of discipline in the prison." The prosecuting 
witness writes me : "I would like to call your attention in the case of Henry 
Schaaf. It would please me greatly to see him pardoned if you should consider it 
wise." Upon these recommendations a pardon seems proper and it is granted. 

J. D. W. 

23. William B. Thomas, who was convicted in the Owen Circuit Court of the 
crime of robbery and sentenced, on the fifteenth day of December, 1875, to be im- 
prisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned May 10, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The judge of 
the court and several county officers " represent that at the time of the commission 
of said offence said Thomas was intoxicated to a very considerable degree ; that he 
was acting with another or others, who were as guilty as himself ; that his confed- 
erate, or confederates, have been suffered to go unpunished ;" and that they " believe 
it but fair and right that a pardon be granted." The warden reports : " Convict 
William B. Thomas is suffering from chronic sore eyes. Health otherwise good. 
Conduct as a prisoner has been excellent. I think he is worthy of a pardon." The 
present judge of the court and other citizens of the county have made a written 
statement of the circumstances of the crime, showing that Moorehead and Murphy, 
in an intoxicated condition and having money upon their persons, left Spencer, after 
nightfall, for their homes eight miles distant ; that, when about half a mile from 
town, they were attacked, jerked from their horses and robbed by Thomas and one 
John E. Hall, Hall being the leader; that both had been drinking and were in- 
toxicated, Thomas to such an extent that he staggered. Hall was arrested and 
upon promise of favor made a confession implicating other parties besides Thomas. 
Thomas fled, but returned, was convicted and sentenced upon a plea of guilty and 
by his testimony exonerated the two parties accused by Hall. They say: "We 
believe his version the correct one and that he is the less guilty of the two parties 
implicated. We believe that his continued imprisonment, while his more guilty 
partner in guilt (sic) goes free, is not equitable." I concur in this view of the case 
and will grant a pardon. J. D. W. 

24. Gilbert Seibert, who was convicted in the Johnson Circuit Court of the 
crime of burglary, and sentenced, on the 16th day of February, 1876, to be impris- 
oned for the term of three years. Pardoned May 10, 1877, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The judge of the 
court, eleven jurors, the county officers, the members of the bar of Johnson county, 
and a number of other citizens, recommend a pardon. The property taken was 
of the value of seven or eight dollars. The petitioners are of opinion that the 
prisoner has been sufficiently punished. He lias now served more than one year. 

The warden says : 

"Convict Gilbert Seibert's conduct lias been very good indeed. All the prison 
officers regard him as a good man. His pardon would be an encouragement to 
good conduct on the part of other convicts." 

The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

25. James H. SCHELL, who was convicted in the Monroe Circuit Court of the 
crime of arson, and sentenced, at the September term, 1876, to be imprisoned for the 
term of two years. Pardoned May 19, 1877, and released from confinement in the 
State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. It is represented to me by a peti- 



25 

tion of the county officers and leading citizens of Monroe county, including a 
majority of the jurors, that the defendant was convicted upon insufficient evidence, 
and that his guilt is doubtful. He has conducted himself well in prison, but has 
been, and is now, in ill health. Upon a reference of his case to the prison officials 
I have been furnished the following : 

"Jeffersonville, May J2, 1877. 
Governor Williams: 

Sir: — With your request I make the following statement relative to the physical 
■condition of James H. Schell. Said Schell has chronic rheumatism and general 
debility. The knee of the left leg is stiff and very much enlarged, while the muscles 
of the limb have perished. He has been an inmate of the hospital from the day of 
his admission up to the present time, not being able to leave his bed for a single 
day. I regard his case as being beyond the reach of medicine. His pardon, in my 
judgment, would not only be an act of justice, but one of humanity. 

Respectfully, 

W. F. Sherrod, Physician, I. S. P. S." 

A number of prominent citizens of Jeffersonville, familiar with his condition, 
have recommended a pardon. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

26. Marion N. Craig, who was convicted in the Lawrence Circuit Court of 
the crime of rape, and sentenced, at the December term, 1876, to be imprisoned for 
the term of two years. Pardoned May 31, 1877, and released from confinement in 
the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. A large number of citizens of 
Lawrence county have, by petitions, represented to me that, being familiar with the 
facts of the case, they are satisfied that the defendant is innocent of the crime of 
which he was convicted. Nine jurors have signed a petition requesting a pardon. 
The warden reports that his conduct in prison has been very good, and that he 
seems to be a good man. Some citizens of the county have filed a protest for the 
reason that, in their opinion, the verdict, which was' found in a second trial, is just. 
My investigation of the facts has convinced me that a well-founded doubt exists as 
to the correctness of the verdict, and that the prisoner should not be longer held 
under the judgment. A pardon will issue. J. D. W. 

27. Nathaniel T. Isom, who was convicted in the Owen Circuit Court of the 
crime of robbery, and sentenced, on the 2d day of June, 1876, to be imprisoned for 
the term of two years. Pardoned June 2, 1877, and released from confinement in the 
Stnte Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. One hundred and four citizens and 
neighbors of the defendant petition me "to pardon said Isom from further impris- 
onment, for the reason that we (they) are satisfied that he was not guilty of the 
charge of robbery, as was charged against him, and for which he was sentenced to 
the State prison." The judge of the court, and the county officers and members of 
the bar, have made a written statement, in which they say: 

"It has been since developed that no robbery had been committed; at the time 
of the trial it was believed there had been. If the defendant and the person who 
was supposed to have been robbed (one Gallant Dyer) had told the truth about the 
transaction, there would have been no robbery in it. But defendant and Dyer were 
trying to get an innocent party involved, without developing all the facts. The 
defendant's neighbors have generally expressed a desire to have him pardoned. 
Perhaps he has had a sufficient punishment for failing to exonerate his neighbor 



26 

V 

from blame. And as he was not guilty of the charge upon which he was convicted, 
legal justice would demand that he be pardoned. We would, therefore, recommend 
your excellency to pardon him." 

The prisoner has conducted himself well in prison, and, as his guilt is doubtful, 
he will be released. J. D. W. 

28. Clarence Dear, who was convicted in the Vanderburgh Criminal Cir- 
cuit Court ef the crime of robbery, and sentenced, on the 29th day of September, 
1875, to be imprisoned for the term of six years. Pardoned June 4, 1877, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Govemcn\ 
Prominent citizens of Evansville, including several jurors, represent to me by peti- 
tion that the defendant, at the time of his conviction, was a youth of but seventeen 
years, and state "that numerous depredations about the city of Evansville having 
been committed at the time Dear was tried, the community was on that account 
unusually excited and prejudiced. Many persons familiar with the circumstances 
and evidence of the trial believed, and so expressed themselves, that he was inno- 
cent of the charge;" and express the belief that the ends of justice have been fully 
vindicated, and that a pardon is now proper. 

The prosecuting attorney, in his letter, says: 

"At the time he was convicted several other parties were indicted as confeder- 
ates with the said Dear. They were tried, convicted and sentenced for the term of 
two years each. Dear was convicted in August, 1875. I think the term of two 
years is long enough under the circumstances, and would therefore recommend the 
favorable consideration of his petition." 

The judge adds: 

" I concur in the above. W. P. Hargrave, 

Judge Vanderburgh Criminal Circuit Court." 

I have been furnished a sworn statement, made by Nellie Spencer, now in the 
Female Prison for the same crime, in which she says that the prisoner was not present 
and did not participate in the robbery, but that when she and Kinney, (alias Young 
alias Vonderhyde), were arrested, he proposed to her to implicate him, which she 
refused to do. I have also been furnished an affidavit of John Louis Kinney, alias 
Vonderhyde, who is serving a term in the Kentucky penitentiary, in which he says 
"that said Dear is innocent of the crime with which he is charged, the theft being 
committed by Vonderhyde himself, and afterwards charged upon Dear by him." 
In a criminal action against Noah Levi, alias Noah Holstein, alias Holstein Levi, 
tried by a jury in the same court, in February, 1876, Edward Weaver testified as 
follows : 

" Question. — Did John L. Kinney, about one month after he was committed to 
jail, and while in jail, state to you that the first time he ever saw Noah Holstein 
and Clarence Dear he saw them in the city lock-up; that they were in there, and he 
came in there afterwards? 

Answer. — Yes, sir. 

Question. — Tell the jury how he came to make that statement to you. 

Answer. — I was around there talking to him, and I asked him if he knew 
Noah Holstein before he came in there, and he said no, he had never seen him 
until he seen him in the lock-up. I asked him why he testified as he did, and he 
said before he would take ten years he would get any one in it. 

Question. — That was in the same conversation, was it? 

Answer. — Yes, sir." 



27 

Other statements, entitle.fl to respect, have been presented, and, however little 
weight the testimony of felons may have as a general rule, in this case there is such 
strong proof of innocence that I can not permit the execution of the sentence to 
proceed further, and will pardon the prisoner. J. D. W. 

29. Charles Colley, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 4th day of October, 1875,. 
to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned June 4, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The pris- 
oner has now served one year and eight months, and is reported favorably by the 
board of directors and warden. His pardon is asked by the judge and prosecuting 
attorney of the court, seven jurors and the clerk, auditor, recorder, sheriff and 
treasurer. In their petition they say that the defendant "was tried on a joint 
indictment with one John Landringham," and assign the following reasons in 
support of their application : 

1. That said Charles, at the time of his said conviction, was, and still is, a 
minor, and under twenty-one years of age. 

2. That said Landringham, with whom the said Charles was jointly tried, 
was a man of full age, several years the senior of said Colley, and had been 
previously convicted in said court for felony, and sentenced to the State Prison 
North, and that said Landringham, in the instance of said Colley's conviction, was 
the leader and chief participator in the offense for which they were so jointly con- 
victed, and that said Colley, being of immature years and judgment, was led into 

and induced to participate in said larceny by said Landringham. 
«.. _ 

3. That said Colley is the son of a widowed mother, who resides in Indianapolis, 

with her family of children, and that he became fatherless while quite young; that 
in the event of executive clemency being extended to said Charles, his mother will 
send him at once to his uncle, in a Western State, there to remain. 

The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

30. Frank Heinrich [.was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court of 
the crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 17th day of April, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of ninety days. Pardoned June 4. 1877, and released from 
confinement in the jail of Marion county. Decision : By the Governor. The prisoner^ 
in his own name, asks a pardon, and shows that he was convicted upon a plea of 
guilty; that he was driven by actual want to commit the crime; that he is a news- 
paper man, and has a chance to engage in business again in Pittsburg on the 10th 
instant; and that he desires, by an honest life in the future, to show to his friends 
and the world that he is not a thief. The judge, prosecuting attorney and county 
officers add a recommendation that the prayer of petitioner be granted. It is so 
•rdered, and a pardon will issue. J. D. W. 

31. John JIotjglass, who was convicted in the Hendricks Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 16th day of June, 1876, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned June 16, 1877, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner was 
convicted of stealing five pieces of meat of the value of twenty dollars. A petition 
was filed in January last. It is signed by a large number of citizens of the county, and 
the prosecuting attorney and several county officers, and shows "that the said John 
Douglass is a man about twenty-eight years of age; that he has lived all his life in 



28 

Hendricks county, Indiana ; that up to the time of the commission of the alleged lar- 
ceny he had borne an irreproachable reputation ; that he was possessed of but very 
little property, and that he has a wife and two small children depending upon him 
for their support; that shortly before the commission of the alleged larceny the 
dwelling house of the said Douglass was destroyed by fire, together with all his 
furniture, wearing apparel and provisions ; that said fire left him and his family in 
very destitute circumstances, in consequence of which the said Douglass became 
greatly discouraged and depressed in spirits, and being a man of very limited 
capacity of intellect and strong impulses, and being, as your petitioners believe, 
impelled by the destitute and suffering condition of his family, at this time actually 
in want, and forgetting his obligations to society, and that old adage that it is better 
to beg than to steal, unfortunately, in an unguarded moment, yielded to the tempta- 
tion to relieve them by taking that which was not his own." They recommend a 
pardon. 

The judge adds the following : 

"The sentence in this case was upon a plea of guilty, and the court had no alter- 
native but to award the statutory punishment. I remember thinking the lightest 
term allowed by the law excessive in this particular case, and regretting that I 
could do nothing for him. I unite in the prayer of this petition." 

My predecessor made this endorsement : 

"Filed January 5, 1877, by S. L. Hawkins, late sheriff of Hendricks county. 
From his statement I am satisfied I would grant a pardon. The wife and children 
are supported at public charge. It is not now probable that I can act upon the 
case, but I recommend it to my successor." 

The warden reports his conduct good. He has now served one year, aad will be 
released. J. D. W. 

32. James M. McCokkle, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crimes of burglary and grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 16th day 
of December, 1875, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned June 16, 
1877, and released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the 
Governor. The judge, prosecuting attorney, the present and former sheriff, and the 
auditor and recorder of Marion county, represent to me, by petition, that the 
defendant was convicted upon a plea of guilty; that the property taken consisted 
of a small quantity of liquor and tobacco; that he had previously borne a good 
character, and that this was his first offense. They recommend a pardon. The 
prisoner has conducted himself well in prison, and has now served eighteen months 
of his term. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

33. William Berg, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
. of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 13th day of February, 1876, to 

be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned June 22, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. The judge, 
prosecuting attorney and clerk of the court and other citizens of Marion county 
recommend a pardon for the reason that in their opinion the defendant has been 
sufficiently punished. The prosecuting witnesses make this recommendation : 



. . 29 

"Indianapolis, Ind., December 27, 1876. 
To his Excellency, Governor Thomas A. Hendricks: 

Dear Sir : — At the request of William Berg's friends, we would most respectfully 
represent to your honor, that after a careful examination of all the facts relating 
to the guilt of Mr. Berg, we really think the whole thing was caused by the de- 
structive demon of intoxication. That both Berg and Gimbell were under the influ- 
ence of liquor at the time the crime was committed and we feel confident, had the 
boys been sober, it never would have happened. As Gimbell was pardoned some 
three months ago, we, as the prosecuting witnesses most respectfully petition your 
Excellency to exercise your exective clemency by pardoning this man Berg also, if 
not inconsistent with your official duties. 

Yours to command, 

L. I. Mosseer & Bro." 

The officers and members of the Indianapolis Fire Department represeut to me that 
the prisoner was for ten years a member of the department, " and bore an excellent 
character and was considered one of the most trusty men in the service, but in an 
evil hour he was induced to drink with some of his companions and became intoxi- 
cated, and while in that condition committed the deed for which he now stands 
convicted." They think he has been fully punished for an act that would not have 
been committed if he had not been intoxicated, and ask that he be pardoned. The 
warden reports his conduct good. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

34. John P. Brendle, who was convicted in the Boone Circuit Court of the 
crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 21st day of May, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of ninety days and disfranchised. Pardoned and right of 
suffrage remitted unto him July 3, 1877, and released from confinement in the 
jail of Boone county. Decision: By the Governor. The defendant was charged 
with stealing three walnut saw logs, of the value. of twelve dollars, eight hundred 
feet of walnut lumber, the product of the logs, and thirty bushels of corn, of the 
value of six dollars. The jury was engaged a long time in deliberation, and then 
fixed the punishment at ninety days imprisonment, a fine of one cent, and disfran- 
chisement for two years. The neighbors and acquaintances of the prisoner say to 
me that he is innocent of the charge ; that he has been living for six years past on 
the land of his wife and two minor children, and that the corn charged to have been 
stolen was the rent corn left in the field by the renter as Brendle's share of the crop. 
They say that he is in feeble health, and that the jail in which he is confined is so 
small, dark, unventilated, damp and unhealthy that it might and probably would 
result in his death. They recommend his pardon, and, as he has served one- 
half of his term, it is granted. J. D. W. 

35. Aevin H. Fitch, who was convicted in the LaPorfe Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 7th day of May, 1875, to be im- 
prisoned for the term of three years. Pardoned July 6, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison jSTorth. Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner 
has now served twenty-six months and the warden reports his conduct good. His 
pardon is recommended by the judge of the court, the ex-prosecuting attorney, the 
clerk, sheriff, auditor and recorder of Laporte county, and by Messrs. Myers and 
Ittah. The papers before me show " that said Fitch was an employe of S. E. Taylor 
& Co., printers at Laporte ; that he went to the livery stable of Messrs. Myers & 
Ittah and hired a horse and buggy and went to Michigan City ; that, after being in 



30 

Michigan City for a few hours he became intoxicated ; that the officers suspected 
said Fitch, and went to him and proposed to buy the rig, and he consented to sell." 
He was then arrested. It seems that the defendant was drawn into the commission 
of the crime, if such it was, by the persuasion of parties who were desirous of 
realizing a reward of fifty dollars offered by the county for the detection and arrest 
of a horsethief. The prisoner has been severely punished for his drunken freak. 
Mr. S. E. Taylor writes " that he has always borne a good moral character," and 
that he believes him "to be an object for executive clemency." The pardon is 
granted. J. D. W. 

36. George C. Leonard, who was convicted in the Allen Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 2d day of January, 
1877, to be imprisoned for the term of one year. Pardoned July 7, 1877, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Gov- 
ernor. Nine jurors ask a pardon and in their petition say, " that Leonard is a 
young man of about twenty-three years of age, is of a good family, and heretofore 
has sustained an unblemished character, as was testified by the best of men on his 
trial. By the proof it appears that he was employed as a clerk in the dry goods 
house of Foster Bros. & Co., in the city of Fort Wayne, during the spring and summer 
of 1876. On the 22d day of July last, having obtained leave of absence from his 
employers, was about to leave for a week or two, to visit his home and friends in 
Wayne county. The amount then due him from his employers was five dollars and 
forty-four cents. He hoped to get another position among his friends, but was not 
sure he could do so. He did not wish Foster Bros, to know this, believing that such 
knowledge on their part would cause his instant dismissal, and that if he failed in 
getting the position among his friends, he would be out of employment altogether. 

Under these circumstances he took from Foster Bros, goods which did not in 
value exceed the amount due him, and which, at the time, he intended should 
discharge the balance due him. When arrested he did not deny the fact that he had 
taken the goods. He has always claimed taat he took the goods in payment of what 
was due him. He may be technically guilty of larceny, but we believe that his 
offense consists in a mere misapprehension of the law and that there was no 
intentional wrong." The prosecuting attorneymakes a statement substantially 
the same and recommends a pardon. Henry Colerick, Esq., who assisted in the 
prosecution, has written to the same effect. More than one-half his term has expired, 
and his conduct while in prison has been good. He had been imprisoned a consid- 
erable time before his conviction, and under all the circumstances shown has been 
sevarely punished. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

37. George W. Johnson, who was convicted in the St. Joseph Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 19th day of October, 1875, to 
be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned July 19, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The pris- 
oner has now served twenty-one months. The judge of the court makes the follow- 
ing statement: 

"South Bend, November 1, 1876. 
Governor Thomas A. Hendricks: 

Dear Sir: At the October term, a year ago, of the St. Joseph Circuit Court, 
George W.Johnson was found guilty of grand larceny and sentenced to the peniten- 
tiary for two years. The charge was for stealing a coat from a store. In order to 
get possession of the property, he represented that, before he bought it, he wanted 



31 

to show it to his father, and, if his father consented to it, he would take it and pay 
for it. The truth was, he had no father then living, and ran away as soon as he got 
out of the store with the coat. He had been raised in this county, and no one before 
thought he would be guilty of such conduct. His parents were respectable people. 
Hi3 mother is still a widow — poor, and finds it pretty hard work to make a living— 
and, like all mothers, very anxious to get her son out of prison. He has now served 
out half his time, and I am informed has behaved himself well while in prison. I 
think, under all the circumstances, he is a subject of executive clemency, and I 
therefore recommend that he be pardoned. I promised after he had been in prison 
a year I would make this recommendation, provided he behaved well. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Thomas S. Stanfield." 

The petition for his pardon is signed by the clerk, sheriff and treasurer, and 
other citizens of St. Joseph county. Hon. Joseph Henderson, senator, has advised 
a pardon. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

38. Thomas Rainey, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Courj 
of the crime of rape, and sentenced, on the 17th day of July, 1876, to be imprisoned 
for the term of five years. Pardoned July 23, 1877, and released from confinement 
in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The defendant's appeal to 
the Supreme Court resulted in an affirmance of the judgment, as appears from the 
decision reported in 53 Indiana, page 278. He has now served one year of his term, 
and has behaved well in prison. I have seen and conversed with the prisoner, and 
with the friends of the girl. The prosecuting witness, and others familiar with the 
facts recommend a pardon ; partly because they now have a doubt of his guilt, and 
partly because they think he has been sufficiently punished. My predecessor, to 
whom the application was first submitted, made this endorsement: 

"I regret I can not complete the examination of this case. My impression is 
that the prisoner should be pardoned at an early day. He worked for Mr. Fred. 
Rush, of this city, and upon his statements, and upon the within evidence, I think 
the case is not strong enough to keep the young man long in prison. 

T. A. H. 
January 6, 1877." 

I have no reason to doubt the sincerity of the girl who supposed she was injured 
by the defendant, and now expresses a doubt as to his guilt; and, after my conver- 
sation with the prisoner, am led to believe that he should not be longer punished. 
The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

39. Henky Hile, who was convicted in the Randolph Circuit Court of the 
crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 25th day of January, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of one year. Pardoned July 25, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The petition 
is signed by Thomas M. Browne, Alexander Gullett, ex-prosecuting attorney, A. O. 
Marsh, prosecuting attorney, and the clerk of the court, and by the sheriff and other 
citizens of Randolph county. It shows that the defendant was convicted upon a 
plea of guilty, and contains this recommendation: 

"The offense for which Henry Hill was thus sentenced was larceny of the lowest 
grade, and was surrounded by no circumstances of aggravation. He is a young 
man, just past his majority, and this is the first crime imputed to him. In view of 



32 

these facts, and that he has already undergone several months of humiliating impris- 
onment, we respectfully ask your Excellency to grant him a pardon." 

The judge adds: 

"I concur in the above request. Silas Colgrove, 

Judge Twenty-fifth Circuit." 

The prisoner has now served one-half his term, and has conducted himself well 
in prison. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

40. George W. Jinks, who was convicted in the Eandolph Circuit Court of 
the crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 25th day of January, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of one year. Pardoned July 25, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The petition is 
signed by the judge, prosecuting attorney, clerk of the court, and sheriff of the 
county, and by leading citizens, and presents a case much the same as that of Henry 
Hill (No. 39) from the same court, sentenced on the same day. The prisoner has 
now served one-half his term, and has behaved well in prison, as the warden reports 
to me to-day. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

41. Nelson P. Hood, who was convicted in the Dearborn Circuit Court of the 
crime of fornication, and sentenced, on the 28th day of May, 1877, to be imprisoned 
for the term of six months. Pardoned July 27, 1877, and released from confinement 
in the jail of Dearborn county. Decision: By the Governor. The facts of this case, 
and the questions of law arising upon them, are fully stated in the recent opinion 
and decision of the Supreme Court affirming the judgment. The defendant, in 
addition to his term of imprisonment, was sentenced to pay a fine of one hundred 
dollars. A certificate of the clerk of the court, received this day, shows that it "has 
been paid in full, and that the costs in the case have been settled to the satisfaction 
of the parties entitled thereto." 

In a letter enclosing the certificate, the clerk says: 

"Public sentiment in this community is almost universally in favor of Mr. 
Hood's pardon, and the interposition of Executive clemency will meet with general 
approval." 

Immediately upon his commitment to jail (May 31), I was asked, by a petition 
of leading citizens of the city of Aurora, and by a like petition signed by prominent 
and highly respectable ladies, resident there, to grant the defendant relief from 
the penalties imposed by the court. 

Opposition was made by the State's counsel, who said: 

"We feel that the Utah divorces are frauds upon the citizens of the State, and 
we want the matter fully settled by our court of last resort. The case is one of 
great aggravation, and we feel that for your Excellency to act on the petition with- 
out the fullest examination of the evidence, and all the circumstances, would be to 
do injustice to all concerned." 

Mrs. Maggie Horton Hood also, by letter, asked me to defer action until a 
remonstrance could be prepared, and her health permit her to visit me in person. 
She has neither furnished a remonstrance nor communicated with me further. Two 
months of the six have expired. I have received the following letter from one of 
the State's counsel: 



33 

" Lawrenceburg, Ind., July 17, 1877. 

To his Excellency James D. Williams, Governor of Indiana : 

I think it would be right and proper to release Nelson F. Hood from the balance 
of his term of imprisonment in the Dearborn county jail, on condition that he pay 
or replevy his fine and costs. 

Yours, respectfully, 

H. D. McMuelen." 

The clerk, auditor, sheriff, treasurer, recorder, and the commissioners of Dear- 
born county, the mayor of the city of Aurora, and others recommend that I do now 
release the defendant by pardoning him. Upon the facts and recommendations 
now presented I deem it proper to grant the application, and a pardon will issue. 

J. D. W. 

42. Jacob Bechtoe, who was convicted In the Wabash Circuit Court of the 
crime of forgery, and sentenced, on the 18th day of December, 1875, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned August 1st, 1877, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. A large number of 
citizens of Wabash county have signed the petition. Eleven jurors, in a petition 
dated January 3, 1876, say "that although the evidence in the case warranted us, 
as we believe, in finding him [Bechtol] guilty of the charge as preferred, yet we 
believe — those of us who are personally acquainted with him, speaking from our 
personal acquaintance, and all of us speaking from our observation of his deport- 
ment during said trial, and from the information we have since obtained respecting 
his previous good character as an honest, industrious and law-abiding citizen — that 
his case is one well worthy of the exercise of your Excellency's clemency in his 
behalf, and believing that, if released, he would henceforth be a law-abiding and 
good citizen; that the well-being of society would not be injured by bis enlarge- 
ment, and that he has already, in his humiliation and shame, and in the distress of 
mind suffered by him since the alleged commission, more than a year ago, of said 
offense, and by his imprisonment in the penitentiary to this time, been, under the 
circumstances of his case, pretty severely punished, respectfully ask that he may 
be pardoned and released from any further imprisonment for his said offense." 

Judge Slack says : 

"I tried the case in the Wabash Circuit Court, heard all the evidence, and, 
while I had no doubt of his guilt, and the jury could not have done otherwise than 
convict under the evidence, yet his previous good character, his industry, and the 
general respect entertained for him in the community, induced me to think it was 
his first offense, and the probabilities of its not being repeated induce me to think 
him a proper subject for Executive clemency, and, therefore, join with the jury in 
asking his pardon." 

A protest having been made by the prosecuting attorney as well for himself as 
at the request of citizens of Wabash, in February, 1876, my predecessor refused to 
grant a pardon. Subsequently he and his deputy at Wabash recommended that a 
pardon be granted, and in their letters say that they express the present opinion of 
those familiar with the case. The warden reports the prisoner's conduct good. He 
has now served more than three-fourths of his term. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W- 

3 Pardons. 



34 

43. James P. McIlwain, who was convicted in the Delaware Circuit Court of 
the crime of manslaughter, and sentenced, on the 18th day of February, 1877, to 
be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned August 8, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The de- 
fendant was a practicing physician and was indicted for the murder of Mary A. 
Foorman, alleged to have been committed on the 11th day of November, 1875, by 
administering to her certain noxious and deadly poisonous drugs, and by careless, 
negligent and unskillful treatment while suffering from the effects of certain dan- 
gerous and deadly wounds, cuts, bruises and incisions inflicted by him upon her 
private parts. Other persons were separately indicted for the same offense. No 
other conviction has been had. The clerk of the court has certified to me that on 
the 18th day of last month " an entry of nolle prosequi by and with the consent of 
the court was made and entered of record in said court in each of the following 
causes, to-wit: State of Indiana v. Hiram V. Manzer, No. 447 — murder; State of 
Indiana v. Eobert Brandt, No. 448 — acting accessory part; State of Indiana v. 
Hiram V. Manzer, No. 450 — acting accessory part ; State of Indiana v. Hiram V. 
Manzer and Eobert Brandt, No. 451 — murder; State of Indiana v. John Foorman, 
No. 461 — accessory after the fact; State of Indiana v. Nathan Smith, No. 467— 
accessory after the fact; and that there are no other criminal prosecutions now 
pending in said court, growing out of the alleged murder and disposition of the 
body of Mary Foorman, at or near Eaton, Delaware county, Indiana, all of which 
appears from a careful examination of the records on file in said court." The 
prisoner has now served nearly six months of his term. The warden reports his 
conduct unexceptionably good. Since the defendant's conviction, before as after 
his sentence, I have received petitions numerously signed by citizens of Delaware 
county and others asking that a pardon be granted. I' have also been furnished 
for perusal the voluminous short-hand report of the evidence, given upon the trial, 
and having read the important parts of it, I have always thought that unless the 
indictments returned against the other parties were prosecuted to their conviction, 
or acquittal, and those more guilty than this defendant received their deserved 
punishment, he should not be held longer. Five jurors ask that he be pardoned. 
The prisoner has rendered valuable medical assistance while in the prison, but has 
been suffering for several weeks past, from bilious fever. The prison physician 
informs me that he has chronic bronchitis and functional trouble of the heart, and 
that confinement is injurious. I have given this application much careful atten- 
tion, and in view of all the facts presented am of the opinion that it should be 
granted. A pardon will issue to the defendant. J. D. W. 

44. John Kelly, who was convicted in the Allen Criminal Circuit Court of 
the crime of illegally offering to vote, and sentenced, on the 13th day of November, 
1876, to be imprisoned for the term of one year. Pardoned August 22, 1877, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. 
The prisoner has now served more than nine months and the warden informs me 
that his- conduct has been unexceptionable during his confinement. In the petition 
signed by the judge and the clerk, sheriff, treasurer and recorder and a commis- 
sioner of Allen county, and other prominent citizens, is this statement: 

"It appeared that he was intoxcated at the time of offering the vote as charged, 
and in view of that fact, and the immunity generally extended elsewhere to others 
guilty of far greater infractions of the election laws, that he has already suffered 
enough ; that, prio£ to 1873 the act would have been but a misdemeanor, we 



35 

therefore respectfully but earnestly and urgently request that he be made the subject 
of executive clemency by pardon." 

Homer C. Hartman, who conducted proceedings against the defendant before 
the United States Commissioner for the same offense, recommends a pardon. The 
■circumstances of the prisoner's act show that his unlawful offer was not made with 
a view to affect the result of the election, as he did not seem to care which ticket 
he voted. Believing that he has suffered sufficiently, I will grant a pardon. 

J. D. W. 

45. John Charles Harean, who was convicted in the Tipton Circuit Court 
■of the crime of assault and battery with intent to murder, and sentenced, on the 
11th day of December, 1876, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned 
August 30, 1877,'and released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : 
By the Governor. Since his conviction the defendant has been adjudged of unsound 
mind. His pardon is asked by a large number of citizens of Tipton county. Upon 
a reference to the warden, he reports the prisoner's conduct good, and sends me a 
report by the prison physician, which contains the following : 

"John C. Harlan has been examined by me, and been under my treatment for 
the last two months. His general health is good, there being no lesion of any 
important organ, but he has been affected twice with a severe epileptic spasm, fol- 
lowed for two or three weeks with wild delirium and vertigo. His mind has been 
impaired since he came within these walls. During the mental aberration which 
occurs after his epileptic seizures, he ought not to be held responsible for his acts. 
I understand he has been subject to epilepsy for several years. The confinement 
and anxiety of prison life would certainly tend to increase his disease." 

A later communication from the physician contains the following: 

"John C. Harlan, an inmate of this prison, concerning whom you have already 
sent inquiry, is perfectly crazy. His maniacal ravings are a great annoyance, as 
there is no place in which he can be confined without disturbing all the other pris- 
oners by his loud cries at night. I would strongly recommend a pardon, and that 
he should then be taken to the insane asylum at Indianapolis." The pardon is 
granted. J. D. W. 

46. Omer T. Pierce, who was convicted in the Dearborn Circuit Court of the 
orime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 4th day of March, 1876, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned September 18, 1877, and released from 
•confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner 
has served more than eighteen months. The warden says that his conduct has been 
very good, and that he is one of the best men in the prison. His pardon is asked 
by officers and leading citizens of Dearborn county, who say in their petition that 
the defendant "was, previous to his excessive use of intoxicating liquor, an indus- 
trious and upright young man, and (they) believe, if his liberty is restored to him, 
will pursue his habits of industry." All the jurors have signed a petition in which 
they recite the facts and circumstances of the crime, and say : 

"Upon the evidence, we were compelled to convict, but in our opinion, and under 
the evidence produced, and in the light of justice and humanity, we would hereby 
recommend him to your Excellency as a subject wherein executive clemency should 
be exercised." 



, 36 

Valentine J. Koehler, from whom the defendant took the money, is of the opinion 
that he has now been sufficiently punished, and recommends his pardon. 

The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

47. Silas Eaglan, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 18th day of September, 1876, 
to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned September 18, 1877, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. 
The prisoner has served one-half his term, and has conducted himself well in prison. 
He is quite young. The attorney who prosecuted him, the clerk of the court, the 
auditor, treasurer and sheriff of Marion county, and other respectable citizens, ask 
that he be now pardoned, in the hope that he may yet become a useful member of 
society. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

48. Amasa T. Eaymek, who was convicted in the Elkhart Circuit Court of 
the crime of receiving stolen goods, and sentenced, on the 28th day of March, 1876, 
to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned September 28, 1877, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. 
The prisoner's alleged offense was the purchase of a pair of boots of the value of six 
dollars, knowing them to be stolen. The petition is signed by nine of the jury, the 
deputy prosecuting attorney, Hon. J. H. Baker, M. C, and four attorneys. It is 
said that the conviction rested mainly on the testimony of the thief, and doubt 
exists as to its correctness. The judge and clerk of the court, and the auditor, 
treasurer and recorder of Elkhart county, and officers and citizens of Goshen, have 
signed a recommendation of pardon. The sheriff and his deputy have written me a 
letter in his behalf. 

Dr. H. A. Stonex, late prison physician, says of him: 

"For a year past he has been almost daily under my observation, and I can 
truly say that I have no recollection of having ever heard any fault found with 
him for misbehavior in any way since his incarceration in prison. In short, I have 
always considered him an exceptionally good prisoner." 

Isaac A. Simmons, Esq., says: 

"Mr. Eaymer was employed in our office up to within a year of the time of his 
alleged violation of the law, and was relieved by reason of a change in our business 
firm, and, if he is now pardoned, I would have no hesitancy in again offering him 
a position, his expertness with the pen being far above the average, and his general 
business ability being unquestioned, and his honesty and integrity has never been 
questioned so far as I know, excepting in this case. The pardoning power can 
never, in my opinion, be used in a more worthy case." 

The prisoner has now served three-fourths of his term, and the warden reports 
that his conduct has been good. J. D. W. 

49. Thomas Killoren, who was convicted in the Boone Circuit Court of the 
crime of illegal voting, and sentenced, on the 24th day of November, 1876, 
to be imprisoned for the term of one year. Pardoned October 1, 1877, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. 
The prisoner has but a few days to serve, and the warden reports his conduct good. 
He was convicted upon his plea of guilty. A pardon is asked by respectable 
citizens of Boone, Clinton and Montgomery counties, including the clerk of the 



37 

<court and the prosecuting attorney. I have heen furnished a statement of the facts 
by the prosecuting attorney, and have talked with the senator and representative 
familiar with the circumstances, and conclude that the defendant has now heen 
sufficiently punished and should be pardoned. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

50. William Ehlman, who was convicted in the Dearborn Circuit Court of 
the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 25th day of February, 1876, to 
be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned October 5, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The 
defendant has now been imprisoned more than twenty months, and the warden 
reports that his conduct " has been very good indeed." He has a wife and a large 
family of young children, in a destitute and dependent condition, in Dearborn 
county. His pardon is asked by a large number of the citizens of the county, 
including several of the county officers. From their representations I am satisfied 
that he has been adequately punished and should be restored to his family. The 
pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

51. Frank Moore, who was convicted in the Bartholomew Circuit Court of 
the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 6th day of September, 1876, to 
be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned October 10, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The con- 
vict has served more than thirteen months. The warden reports that his conduct 
"has been very good indeed." He is said to be helpless, having one side paralyzed, 
and is sixty-three years old. His conviction was upon a plea of guilty to a charge 
of stealing a bundle of clothing, consisting of a cloth coat and a pair of pants. He 
was in the service of the United States in 1847, on the Texas frontier, became dis- 
abled, and has received a pension. Some of his enemies having procured its sus- 
pension he was left without means, and tempted by bad associates to commit the 
crime to relieve his necessities. His pension has now been restored and increased, 
and he will have means of support. He desires to spend the remainder of his life 
in a warmer climate. The judge, prosecuting attorney and clerk of the court and 
the treasurer, auditor, sheriff and recorder of the county recommend a pardon. 

The prosecuting attorney says : 

" I think the old man ought to be released, and he is the only one that has been 
sentenced during my term about which I have had any doubts about the justice of 
their sentence. I have, therefore, in view of the age of the prisoner, and other 
matters stated in your petition, signed the same, believing it to be right and just." 

The punishment now suffered has been sufficient, and he should be released. 
The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

52. James • Bridges, who was convicted in the Hancock Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 16th day of April, 1876, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned October 16, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. This 
application was made in December last by the convict's wife, who presented a 
petition. The larceny consisted in the taking; of an overcoat from a railroad car 
when leaving the train at Charlottesville. Defendant claimed .that it was done 
while he was intoxicated, and through an excusable mistake. Upon a reference 
to the prosecuting attoney, he reported the facts, and added : 



38 

" Don't think he made any mistake. But I don't think he is a bad thief. On 
account of his wife, who is no doubt strictly honest, he had my sympathy as well 
as that of the judge, and we would have willingly reduced the charge to petit- 
larceny if we could have done so." 

My predecessor then said : 

"In refusing this case at this time, I do not decide that after a year the case 
might not allow his pardon. I think, at the end of the year, he might be par- 
doned." 

Since that decision, the county officers of Hancock county have recommended 
executive clemency in his behalf. The warden reports his conduct good. He has 
now served eighteen months, and I think has been sufficiently punished. The par- 
don is granted. J. D. W. 

53. William Cunningham, who was convicted in the Boone Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 3d day of October, 1876, to 
bs imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned November 1, 1877, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor* 
The prisoner has served more than one-half his term, and has conducted himself 
well in prison. His pardon is asked by citizens of Boone county, including several 
county officers. The sum taken was ten dollars. Under the law as amended soon, 
after his conviction, his offense would have been petit larceny. The prosecuting 
attorney says that he is " not, as a rule, in favor of the Governor of the State step- 
ping in and pardoning a man after he has been regularly convicted by a jury of 
his countrymen, in a fair and impartial trial, but in the case of Cunningham," he 
thinks, "that there are mitigating circumstances that should have a bearing on his 
case," and that he has been sufficiently punished. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

54. Charles Haqekty, who was convicted in the Blackford Circuit Court of 
the crime of forgery, and sentenced, on the 27th day of May, 1876, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned November 3, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The applica- 
tion is made by citizens of Madison county, of which county the prisoner is a 
nati ?e, and was a resident. Their recommendation of pardon is entitled to respect 
and, as the judge joins in the prayer, should have great weight in the convict's 
favor. He has served more than seventeen months, and is well reported by the 
warden. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

55. James Claek, who was convicted in the Allan Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 2d day of January, 1877, to 
be imprisoned for the term of one year. Pardoned November 7, 1877, and re- 
leased from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. 
More than ten months of the term have expired, and the convict is well reported by 
the warden. The petition is signed by several county officers, the judge, prosecut- 
ing attorney of the circuit court, the senator, and several attorneys and other citi- 
zens of Allen county. They represent "that in their judgment the said Clark is a 
suitable person for the exercise of executive clemency, and that, owing to the good 
standing in society of his family, his age, the small value of the article alleged to 
have been stolen, and the further fact that he was at the time so far intoxicated as- 



39 

to make the taking of the property more of the nature of a trespass than of a 
larceny," he should he pardoned. The judge of the court says: 

"I was somewhat douhtful at the time whether Clark ought to have gone to 
the penitentiary, and now I am fully convinced he should he pardoned out." 

The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

56. Max Newman, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of embezzlement, and sentenced, on the 17th day of November, 1873, to 
be imprisoned for the term of eight years. Pardoned November 19, 1877, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. 
The defendant has now served one-half his term. The warden reports his conduct 
good. The application was made in April last, but was deferred until this time for 
final action. Charles F. Hahn, of the firm of Hahn & Bals, employers of the 
defendant and sufferers by his crime, recommends a pardon, for the reason that he 
believes he has now been sufficiently punished, and thinks his partner, if alive, 
would join in his recommendation. Hon. Charles H. Test, the presiding judge, 
sayi: 

"Max Newman was undoubtedly guilty, as will more fully appear by a refer- 
ence to a statement of facts accompanying this petition, but I think public justice 
would not suffer by his pardon at the end of three years." 

The prosecuting attorney adds his signature to this recommendation. A large 
number of members of the bar of Marion county express the opinion that, as com- 
pared with other sentences imposed by the court for embezzlement, that of the 
prisoner for eight years is unusually severe, and recommend a pardon after three 
years. The county officers of Marion county and the present judge of the court 
favor a pardon. The employers of the defendant were wholesale liquor dealers. 
He was a traveling agent. Although he used a part of the money for his own 
purposes, he claimed "that he spent most of it for drinks, theatre tickets, etc., for 
the purpose of inducing customers to buy of him ; that his salary was not sufficient 
to cover all these expenses, and that he became short in this manner." Because of 
his good conduct, and his service of four years, a pardon will be granted. 

J. D. W. 

57. Josiah Goldsberry, who was convicted in the Cass Circuit Court of the 
crime of forgery, and sentenced, on the 14th day of October, 1876, to be imprisoned 
for the term of two years. Pardoned November 19, 1877, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner was 
fifty-five years of age when convicted. The petitions for his pardon are signed by 
five jurymen, the prosecuting attorney, several county officers and leading citizens 
of Cass county. I have been furnished a statement of the facts of the crime by the 
judge of the court. He says: 

"He could neither read nor write, but procured a boy to write the name of 
Thos. J. Wilson in a blank note, which was afterward filled up and filed against 
the estate of Wilson. This note was not admitted by the administrator, and the 
issue was tried by me and found against Goldsberry. After this he was tried for 
the forgery. I believe from the evidence, and my knowledge of both Goldsberry 
and Wilson, that Wilson owed Goldsberry justly the amount of the note, but Wil- 
son having died, and Goldsberry, having no proof of his debt, forged the note in 
order to secure his claim. I do not believe he was fully aware of the extent of the 



40 

crime he had committed ; however, he was equally guilty. He is an old citizen of 
this county and stood well with the community until charged with this crime. In 
consideration of his age, his previous good character, his family and his present 
state of health, and the probability that he will not live out his sentence in prison, 
and with the hope that his life will be saved by releasing him from imprisonment, 
I cheerfully recommend and ask your Excellency to pardon him. I believe the 
majority of his friends and neighbors, and the citizens generally of this community, 
will approve of his pardon." 

The warden says: 

" He is fifty-six years of age, and seems to be incapacitated for labor. His con- 
duct is good." 

The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

58. John Jackson, who was convicted in the Delaware Circuit Court of the 
crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 21st day of April, 1877, to be impris- 
oned for the term of one year. Pardoned November 22, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. The prisoner 
was convicted of stealing eight chickens, of the value of two dollars. A pardon is 
asked by citizens of Delaware and Madison counties. 

The judge says : 

"I granted him a new trial, and permitted him to plead guilty to petit larceny, 
and sentenced him to one year's imprisonment. I have no objection to his being 
pardoned." 

The clerk, auditor, sheriff", and treasurer, have added their signatures. Prom- 
inent citizens of Muncie endorse the petition, with recommendations " that the 
punishment already inflicted is more than sufficient for the crime perpetrated," 
and that a pardon should be granted. More than seven months of the twelve have 
expired. The warden reports his conduct good. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

59. John Kerlin, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 22d day of November, 1876, 
to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned November 22, 1877, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. 
The petition for the pardon of the defendant is signed by the judge, prosecuting 
attorney, and clerk of the court, and by the sheriff, treasurer, and auditor of 
Marion county, and shows that he is subject to epileptic fits, and has been for many 
years. It is supported by affidavits of persons who have long known his condition, 
and by certificates of the prison physicians. The present physicians say: 

"John Kerlin has been under our care since our appointment, March last. It 
has been necessary to keep him in the hospital constantly. He is affected with 
chronic epilepsy, and has severe spasms several times a week, in spite of most care- 
ful and thorough treatment. His mental faculties have already become impaired. 
He will probably never be able to perform manual labor, and will never be cured 
of his disease. The confinement and anxieties of prison life act injuriously upon 
him, and he is getting worse instead of better." 

He has now been imprisoned one year, and the warden reports his conduct 
good. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 



41 

60. Oscar F. Megan, who was convicted in the Jefferson Circuit Court of 
the crime of forgery, and sentenced, on the 26th day of April 1876, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned December 1, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner 
was convicted upon his plea of guilty, and sentenced for the lowest term allowed 
by the statute. A petition for his pardon was immediately made by the clerk of 
the court, the other county officers, and other leading citizens. It is signed by the 
president of the First National Bank of Madison, who says: 

"I sign thus because of the estimable character of the parents of the young 
man, and because of the positive assurances given me of the crime having been a 
youthful indiscretion rather than a malicious act. This bank is a sufferer by the 
forgery." 

The cashier adds 'his signature for the same reasons. The prosecuting attorney 
has written a letter to join in the application, and says: 

" I do this for the reason that the convict is barely twenty-one years of age, has 
a wife, is the son of respected and respectable parents, and because I am informed 
that this is his first offense." 

The warden reports the prisoner's conduct good. The chaplain has expressed 
the hope that he may be pardoned. He has now served more than nineteen 
months of his term. The pardon is granted. J. D. "W. 

61. Charles Hawkins, who was convicted in the Howard Circuit Court of 
the crime of assault and battery with intent to kill, and sentenced, on the 5th day 
of June, 1876, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned December 
5, 1877, and released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By 
the Governor. The convict has now served eighteen months of his term, and has 
conducted himself well. A petition for his pardon was received in May last. It 
is signed by unofficial citizens of Howard county. The judge and prosecuting 
attorney add a statement. " that they have not signed the foregoing petition be- 
cause they have concluded to sign no more petitions for pardons under any circum- 
stances." The prison physician says the prisoner has organic disease of the heart, 
that he is incapacitated for manual labor, and that " any strong emotion, or sudden 
violent exertioD, would be liable to produce serious trouble, possibly death." I 
will grant a pardon more on account of his bad health than any thing else. 

J. D. W. 

62. Berry Eobinson, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 7th day of December, 
1876, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned December 6, 1877, 
and released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Gov- 
ernor. An estimable lady of this city has taken much interest in the convict, (who 
is a colored man,) and has presented this application for his pardon. Seven jurors 
have signed one petition; another is signed by the judge and prosecuting attorney 
of the court, and the county officers and their deputies ; and another by many 
prominent and highly respectable citizens of Marion county. One-half the term 
has now expired, and the warden reports the prisoners conduct good. The pardon 
is granted. J. D. W. 

63. William McCormick, who was convicted in the Morgan Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 2d day of March, 1876, to be 



42 

imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned December 8, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The 
prisoner has served more than twenty-one months. The warden reports that his- 
conduct has been very good, and adds: "His pardon would be recommended by 
all the prison officials." 

The chaplain, in a letter before me, says: 

"The cenduct of William McCormick has been very good since here. I think 
him a reformed man, and altogether worthy of pardon, and I sincerely hope his- 
friends may take such action in his case as will bring about this end." 

The petition is signed by nine persons who visit the prison weekly as mission- 
aries. The clerk, sheriff, and auditor, and several attorneys of Morgan county, 
express the belief "that a pardon extended to McCormick for the few remaining 
months of his term, would have an encouraging and salutary effect upon him, and,, 
we [they] hope, aid and end in his complete reformation." 

The prosecuting attorney says: 

"He was convicted on the testimony of one James McNabb, a confessed crim- 
inal. McCormick was at one time a sober, industrious, and wealthy citizen of our- 
county. He fell into the habit of indulging in strong drink, and his downward 
course culminated in his being sent to the penitentiary. I understand that since 
he has been confined in the State's prison he has reformed, and I think that a par- 
don for the few remaining months he has to serve would encourage him greatly, 
and might be the means of fully and completely reforming him for all time to 
come, and it certainly can work no injury to any person whatever." 

The judge says: 

"He was first convicted before me and sent to jail for swearing too strong against 
a liquor-seller, the only instance of the kind I ever heard of in my long experi- 
ence. Any number of drinking men have committed perjury to clear the liquor 
seller, but he is the only one I ever heard of being convicted for trying to punish 
one. I think I was not present when he was tried for larceny. I knew McNabb,. 
and think it not safe to rely much upon his testimony; still McCormick may have 
got a part of the money. I think the punishment of McCormick has and will do 
him good, if there is enough of the man left in him to reform. If you are satisfied 
from the evidence that he has reformed, I would unhesitatingly recommend his- 
pardon. I think a little mercy in giving him a portion of his time would aid 
reformation more than for him to serve his full term out. : ' 

The judge pro tern, says: 

"Had the question of his guilt been submitted to me, under the evidence I 
should have been compelled to have acquitted him, but, as the jury that tried him 
found otherwise, I considered it best, under all the circumstances, to let the verdict 
stand." 

He has learned of the prisoner's reformation, and cordially joins in asking his 
pardon. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

64. Casper Leipshptz, who was convicted in the Elkhart Circuit Court of 
the crime of receiving stolen goods, and sentenced, at the May term, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned December 11, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By (he Governor. The 



43 

petition states "that the evidence against said Leipshitz was entirely circumstan- 
tial, and grave doubts remain as to the guilty intent of said defendant, if guilty at 
all," and "that said Leipshitz, if connected with the commission of the crime at all; 
was made the dupe of others who really perpetrated the principal ofFense." The 
judge, the attorneys for the State, eight jurors, three county officers, and other 
respectable citizens, have signed the petition, with special recommendations of 
pardon. 

Hon. John H. Baker, of counsel for the defendant, says: 

"I do not think the evidence sufficient to justify his conviction. It was entirely 
circumstantial, and it seemed to me to be very weak. I think his case is one in 
which executive clemency could be wisely exercised in granting him a pardon." 

John Cook, Esq., treasurer of the Elkhart Paper Company, writes me : 

"I have had many business transactions with Mr. Leipshitz, and have always 
found him a very honorable man, and think there must be some mistake about the 
crime charged against him, and hope you will look with care and leniency into his 
case." 

The warden reports the prisoner's conduct good. Objection has been made to 
the pardon of the convict until he would make a full and complete disclosure of all 
the facts and of all the persons engaged in the theft. I have yielded to the appar- 
ent force of the objection until the attorneys could have opportunity to examine 
the prisoner and send me his sworn statement, which they have done. A full 
statement of the evidence has been filed in support of the application. Under all 
the circumstances shown to me it seems unjust, if not cruel, to longer hold the 
defendant in prison. The pardon is granted. J. D. "W. 

65. Frederick Miller, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuife 
Court of the crime of forgery, and sentenced, on the 8th day of April, 1876, to be 
imprisoned for the term of three years. Pardoned December 19, 1877, and re- 
leased from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. 
The opinion of the supreme court reversing a former judgment against the de- 
fendant and granting him a new trial, appears in 51 Indiana Reports, page 405. 
He suffered several months imprisonment under that erroneous sentence, was held 
several months after his return from the prison to the county for this new 
trial, and has served under this sentence more than twenty months. His home is 
at Piqua, Ohio. His devoted wife has labored under distressing circumstances to 
support herself and those dependent upon her during his enforced absence, and has 
six times visited this city in his behalf. She has filed, in support of her applica- 
tion, a petition and letters of respectable citizens at the place of her residence, and 
has, in her destitute condition, done all in her power to furnish me information as 
to the facts and merits of the case. Under all the circumstances, I am constrained 
to yield to her earnest appeal. The warden reports the prisoner's conduct good* 
The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

66. James G. Hamlin, who was convicted in the Jefferson Circuit Court of 
the crime of assault and battery with intent to kill, aud sentenced, on the 9th day 
of May, 1876, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned December 
20, 1877, and released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By 
the Governor. The petition is signed by a large number of citizens of Madison and 
vicinity, and shows that the conviction was upon a plea of guilty; "that the charge 



44 

preferred against him was an assault and battery of one Mollie McNeely with 
intent to kill her. The occurrence took place in 1867. At the time said Hamlin 
was only about eighteen or twenty years of age, he being an orphan, and at the 
time the main support of his widowed mother ; that said Mollie seduced young 
Hamlin, and by her bad habits and vicious disposition led him into habits of in- 
temperance, and that while under the influence of drink she excited his jealousy, 
and caused him to commit the act for which he was sent to prison; that, although 
he was immediately indicted, he removed to Indianapolis and engaged in business, 
living an honorable, temperate, and industrious life, and although back and forth 
on visits to his mother in Jeffers m county, he was not arrested or brought to trial 
until the term at which he appeared and entered said plea as aforesaid, and was 
sentenced by the court for the shortest period within the po wer of the court on 
said plea;" and other matters in extenuation of the offense. A conviction so 
many years after the offense is quite remarkable. More than nineteen months of 
the term have been served. The warden has twice reported that his conduct "has 
been very good." The judge says: 

"I think the young man has been punished enough. The woman on whose tes- 
timony the case would have rested if it had not been for a plea of guilty was of 
bad repute. I would not have sent him for more than a year if I could have done 
so under the law, and I think it is a proper ease for your Excellency to exercise 
the pardoning power." 

Judge E. E. Wilson writes: 

" I have a knowledge of the circumstances under which James Hamlin com- 
mitted the act for which he was imprisoned under sentence of the Jefferson Circuit 
Court. There was a technical violation of the law, aside from which I doubt 
whether he should have been punished at all. I think the opinion I express is the 
same entertained by all of our citizens cognizant of the facts. He surely has been 
punished enough, and I think his pardon will meet with universal approbation of 
all who knew the parties. His mother is an estimable but poor widow lady. She 
lives here among us, and is esteemed by all who know her. James has been to 
her a dutiful son, and she now most sorely feels the need of his aid to assist her 
during these hard times." 

Messrs. Tousey & "Wiggins, Landers, Given & Co., and other business men of 
this city bear testimony to the good character and steady habits of the prisoner 
while here. In June last the application was refused for a time. It is now proper 
that it be granted, and a pardon will issue. J. D. "W. 

67. Henry P. Derringer, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Cir- 
cuit Court of the crime of obtaining money by false pretenses, and sentenced 
on the 22d day of December, 1876, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. 
Pardoned December 22, 1877, and released from confinement in the State Prison 
North. Decision: By the Governor. The petition is signed by the judge, prose- 
cuting attorney and clerk of the court, seven members of the jury, and the sherifl', 
auditor and recorder of Marion county. They say that " previous to his said con- 
viction said Henry P. Derringer had always borne a good reputation for honesty 
and truth," and that they "think he has already suffered to a degree commensurate 
with his offense." The crime grew out of the sale of a sewing machine. I am 
assured that honorable employment awaits the prisoner upon his release, as he is a 



45 

good mechanic and industrious, and has a business partnership tendered him. Mr. 
W. D. McClain adds : 

"The offense was committed against the Singer Manufacturing Company, 
whose agent I was at that time, and I earnestly pray your Excellency will grant 
the prayer of your petitioners." 

The warden reports: 

"His conduct has been good, with the exception of one or two violations of the 
rules of prison of a slight character." 

One-half the term has been served. Tbe pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

68. John Bean, who was convicted in the LaGrange Circuit Court of the 
crime of petit larceny, and sentenced on the 22d day of November, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of sixty days. Pardoned December 31, 1877, and released 
from confinement in the jail of LaGrange county. Decision: By the Governor. 
The petition is signed by citizens of LaGrange county and indorsed by the clerk, 
auditor and recorder of the county. It shows that a member of the prisoner's 
family is sick and not expected to recover, and wishes to see his father before he 
dies. I am informed by other persons that the defendant " was indicted for steal- 
ing an ax of the probable value of one dollar and fifty cents, and was convicted 
and sentenced to jail for sixty days and fined twenty-five dollars. Mr. Bean is 
about fifty years of age; has a large family dependent on him for support. He 
has served now over thirty days in jail, and has a son about dying with consump- 
tion. His neighbors will forward to you a petition for pardon. We think the 
sentence was quite severe and that demands of justice have been fully satisfied, 
and we ask that you pardon him to go home, and, if possible, see his son before 
death separates them." 

I will release him from imprisonment except for the fine. The pardon is 
granted. J. D. W. 

69. Charles W. Shaw, who was convicted in the Spencer Circuit Court of 
the crimes of burglary and grand larceny, and sentenced on the 27th day of July, 
1875, to be imprisoned for the term of three years. Pardoned December 31, 1877, 
and released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Gov- 
ernor. A transcript of the judgment shows that the conviction was upon a plea of 
guilty. This application was made August 29, 1877. The petition then received 
is signed by the judge that tried the case, the present prosecuting attorney, the 
prosecuting witnesses, and by county officers and other citizens of Spencer county. 
They urge the youth of the defendant; the respectable character of his family in 
community; the suffering brought upon them by his downfall; his former 
good character; his repentance; the serious effect wrought upon the mind and 
health of his mother, and his good conduct in prison, as good reasons for his 
pardon. In their opinion he has been sufficiently punished for his acts. The 
chaplain of the prison is familiar with the case and recommends its favorable con- 
sideration. The father of the prisoner, forwarding the certificate of his family 
physician, says: , 

" My wife is in extremely delicate health, and [I] feel certain that the release 
of our son and his return home will benefit her health very materially, perhaps 
save her life; in fact, if he is not permitted to come home soon I fear that he will 
never see her alive." 



46 

The physician says : 

" Mrs. Shaw is in very poor health, confined to her bed. Her health has been 
failing since her son was incarcerated in jail and the State Prison. She has beea 
failing ever since. Her mind in the last year has failed as much as her body, and 
my opinion is that if he is not released she will entirely lose her mind, if she 
does not die. If you can consistently do so, please pardon him. He was quite 
young when led astray, and we hope, after his experience, he will do better. It is 
worth the trial." 

Two years and five months have now been served, and the warden gives a good 
report of his conduct during that time. The distressing circumstances attending 
the case seem to demand a pardon, and it is granted. J. D. W. . 

70. James Wilson, who was convicted in the Hamilton Circuit Court of the 
<irime of petit larceny, and sentenced on the 5th day of March, 1877, to be impris- 
oned for the term of one year. Pardoned September 5, 1877, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner 
has served one-half his term. The warden reports his conduct good. The judge, 
the prosecuting attorney, the clerk of the court, the sheriff of the county and seven 
jurors have asked me to pardon him. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 



47 



SERIES OF 1878. 



1. 


John Cline. 


40. 


James Imes. 


2. 


William E. Mansfield. 


41. 


William Cahill. 


3. 


James R. Ogan. 


42. 


William H. McBryant. 


4. 


William H. Bowman. 


43. 


Abe Levi. 


5. 


Henry C. Clark. 


44. 


George M. Grimes. 


6. 


Frank Radcliff. 


45. 


*William Shannon, -> 
William Kirchner. / 


7. 


John Watson. 


46. 


8. 


Rudolph Lostetter. 


47. 


Henry W. Edens. 


9. 


John Fowler. 


48. 


Edward C. Husted. 


10. 


Robert Baird. 


49. 


Israel Harding. 


11. 


Albert E. Williamson. 


50. 


Christian SchaefFer. 


12. 


William Arnold. 


51. 


Hattie Smith. 


13. 


Smith N. Fowler. 


52. 


Leonard J. Schwonenberger. 


14. 


James Convery. . 


53. 


Peter Meyers. 


15. 


* Jeanette Parsons. -i 
Mary Ann Sullivan. / 


54. 


Adam Hagel. 


16. 


55. 


Samuel Morgan. 


17. 


Charles D. Harris. 


56. 


William W. Snyder. 


IS. 


Frank Flynn. 


57. 


Charles Ready. 


19. 


Leon De La Forer. 


58. 


Reynolds Olin. 


20. 


John Southerland. 


59. 


William C. Bridges. 


21. 


Thomas E. Hogan. 


60. 


William J. Abrams. 


22. 


George Graham. 


61. 


Thomas Allen. 


23. 


George Miles. 


62. 


John Kelley. 


24. 


David Williams. 


63. 


Charles Lang. 


25. 


John Baker. 


64. 


John Percifield. 


26. 


Cyrus Albertson. 


65. 


James Good. 


27. 


James Smith. 


66. 


Caleb Johnson. 


28. 


Charles Ott. 


67. 


William L. Irving. 


29. 


Henry F. A. Meissel. 


68. 


Adam Griswold. 


SO. 


Charles H. Warren. 


69. 


William Hunt. 


31. 


John W est - 


70. 


James Matthews. 


32. 


Peter Plunket. 


71. 


Richard Mosier. 


33. 


Benedict Miller. 


72. 


William H. McMillan. 


34. 


Charles P. Curtis. 


73. 


Samuel T. Caplinger. 


35. 


Morgan Carter. 


74. 


Simpson Woollen. 


36. 


Harrison Grimes. 


75. 


John Poe. 


37. 


James Foster. 


76. 


Joseph Smith. 


38. 


Willard Morris. 


77. 


Robert Reese. 


39. 


William Baine. 


78. 


George Hogarty. 



*One decision for both pardons. 



48 



79. Frank Livingston. 

80. William Kurtz. 

81. Charles W. Blankenship. 

82. William Furnish. 

83. Louis Jacobs. 

84. Orlando C. Palmer. 

85. Lewis Bishop. 

86. David Stewart. 

87. Frederick Schaeffer. 



88. Eeed McDaniels. 

89. William S. Watkins. 

90. Harry Oliver. 

91. Carson Emory. 

92. Csesar Graves. 

93. Gilbert A. Crosley. 

94. Alexander Webster. 

95. Frank Lee. 

96. Clarence D. Shingleton. 



1. John Cline, who was convicted in the Vigo Criminal Circuit Court of 
the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the loth day of December, 1876, to 
be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned January 2, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The 
petition fully recites the facts, and is signed by the prosecuting witness, a former 
clerk of the court, and the sheriff and his deputies. The prosecuting witness in a 
letter to me says: 

"At the time my watch was stolen, Cline and myself were so much intoxicated 
that neither of us knew what we were doing. I was unable to state to the grand 
jury, and am unable now to state, who stole my watch. If Cline was the guilty 
party, I am satisfied that it was the result of his intoxication. He has heretofore 
been known as a man of honesty and good reputation. I have known him a long 
time, and always found him such. I did not desire his prosecution, and so in- 
formed the prosecuting attorney. This is the first time he has ever been under lock 
and key; has never before been suspected of any crime or misdemeanor. I make 
this statement voluntarily. I trust be may be pardoned." 

The letter is dated March 9, 1877. Prominent and respectable citizens of the 
county bear testimony to the previous good character of the defendant, and their 
present confidence in him. I am assured that the statements of the prosecuting 
witness may be relied upon. More than one-half the term has been served. The 
warden reports his conduct good. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 



2. William B. Mansfield, who was convicted in the Shelby Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 14th day of April, 1876, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned January 2, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner 
has served a large part of his term, and has behaved well in prison. His pardon 
was asked in August last, by a petition of citizens of Delaware county. They say 
that the defendant bore an excellent character previous to his conviction; that his 
family are respected and worthy citizens of their county; that the prisoner has a 
wife and two small children dependent upon him for support; and that the circum- 
stances attending his conviction were unusually severe and hard upon the accused. 
Hon. Samuel H. Buskirk presided at the trial, and has furnished me a statement of 
the facts developed. He says: 

" Mansfield lived near Muncie, in this State. He was convicted of stealing a 
carpet-bag and some clothing. He and the young man whose property was stolen 
traveled together from some small town in Ohio to Shelbyville, on their way to 



49 

some farm near Franklin. One of them owned the huggy, and the other the 
horse. Each of them had a carpet-bag. When they arrived at Shelbyville, 
Mansfield, while his companion was in a baker-shop, or saloon, took from the 
buggy one of the carpet-bags and took the same to the express office, and had it 
sent to his address at Muncie, taking a receipt in his own name. The carpet-bag 
thus sent did not belong to Mansfield, but to his traveling companion. The de- 
fense was, that the defendant had intended to send his own carpet-bag home, and 
by mistake sent that of his companion. The jury found that it was not a mistake, 
and I could not, as a judge, say that the verdict was not sustained by the evidence, 
and hence overruled the motion for a new trial, and yet he may not have been 
guilty of a felonious taking. He was a stranger in Shelby county, and it in quite 
likely that the proof of the respectability of his family, and his previous good 
character, did not have proper weight with the jury. But conceding that he was 
guilty, he has served out the most of his term, and his relations, friends, and neigh- 
bors, in his old home, are anxious to have him pardoned, believing that his pardon 
would have a good effect [upon] him, and would aid them in restoring him to 
society, and would encourage him to lead a better life; and I cordially unite with 
them in urging your Excellency to grant him a pardon for the remainder of his 
term," 

The protest from "many citizens" is a paper entitled to no respect, because of 
its anonymous character. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

3. James K. Ogan, who was convicted in the Morgan Circuit Court of the 
erime of receiving stolen goods, and sentenced on the 4th day of May, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned January 3, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The 
petition is signed by nearly one hundred respectable citizens of Morgan county. 
Eleven jurors favor a pardon. Their letter of recommendation is indorsed by the 
county officers. Hon. E. Henderson, auditor of state, adds : 

"I personally know Mr. Ogan as a hard-working man, and previous to this 
transaction he bore the reputation of an honest man. I believe at the expiration 
of one year's imprisonment he should be pardoned. The citizens of Morga*. 
county generally feel immediate pardon should be granted." 

The prosecuting attorney and the attorney appointed specially to prosecute this 
case have by letters recommended a pardon. Eight months have now been served. 
The warden reports: 

"The conduct of convict James K. Ogan has been very good." 

Some doubt exists as to the defendant's guilt, and he should not be longer held. 
The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

4. William H. Bowman, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 6th day of December, 
1876, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned January 4, 1878, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. 
The petition was received July 2, 1877. It is signed by the judge, clerk and dep- 
uty prosecuting attorney of the court, the late and the present sheriff and the 
treasurer of Marion county, and two attorneys. They "represent that said Bow- 
man prior to his conviction had borne a good reputation for honesty, and was an 
industrious man. Hig confinement in prison deprives a wife and three children of 

4 Pardons. 



50 

his care and support, and makes them dependent on his father, an old man, with a 
large family to support, who has found it impossible to care for them, he being 
poor, compelled to live on a rented farm. From what petitioners can learn, said 
Bowman was led into the commission of these crimes by others. That if he is 
pardoned he will surely profit by this clemency extended to him, and in future- 
avoid the society of bad men." About thirteen months have expired. The war- 
den reports his conduct good. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

5. Henry C. Clark, who was convicted in the Floyd Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of manslaughter, and sentenced, on the 25th day of October, 1869, to 
be imprisoned for the term of twenty years. Pardoned January 8, 1878, and 
released from confinement in the State. Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. 
The defendant's petition, which was received in 1874, shows that he was indicted 
by the grand jury of Washington county for murder in the first degree, committed 
by killing George Telle, on the 11th day of April, 1868, at Salem; that he had been 
arrested on the 12th day of April, committed after a preliminary examination 
before DeWitt C. Thomas, a justice of the peace, to await indictment, transferred 
upon a change of venue to Floyd county jail, tried, convicted, sentenced and con- 
veyed to the prison where he is now and has been continually since his trial and 
conviction. He represents that at the time of the offense of which he was convicted 
he was barely twenty years of age, and was under the influence of intoxicating: 
liquors; that he was not conscious of any murderous or evil intent toward the 
deceased, had never borne him any malice, but had always regarded him as his 
friend, and had been upon friendly relations with him. Appended thereto is a 
recommendation, signed by a large number of citizens of Washington county> 
"that in consideration of his extreme youth, the punishment he has undergone, his 
penitence and the evidence of his reformation, the respectability and worth of his 
father and other relations, who are among the best citizens of said county, they 
consider him a proper person to receive executive clemency." In support of this 
application have been added petitions and individual letters, constituting a 
voluminous case. 

The magistrate who held the primary examination, writes : 

"From the evidence produced in the case, I am satisfied that Clark did not 
intend to shoot or hurt Telle; the difficulty appeared to be with an entirely differ- 
ent party," and favors his pardon. 

The intimate friend and family physician of the deceased states " that upon a 
most careful examination of [his] body, post mortem, no ball, or any other missile 
could be found. The wound was traced through the walls of the abdomen, but no 
farther, and there was no wound of exit, and there was no possibility of extracting 
any missile by entanglement with the clothing. Being an adept at dissection, and 
having just returned from the field of blood, I felt myself fully competent to make 
the examination and give a trustworthy opinion. Being absent from the State 
during the trial, these facts were not elicited, and I now wish to present them 
because, taken together with well-known facts, [they] would create serious doubts 
in the evidence by which he was committed." 

The judge who tried the case writes: 

"The evidence showed that a temperance organization had been holding a 
meeting at the courthouse in Salem, and had adjourned and passed out of the 



51 

hous>r. Henry Clark, who was very much intoxicated at the time, fired a pistol 
into the crowd, mortally wounding George Telle. I do not think Clark had any 
particular malice toward the party killed, but recklessly shot into the crowd, not 
knowing or caring what might be the result. The recklessness was produced by 
intoxication alone. I do not believe that Henry Clark would commit any crime 
when sober. I have known him from childhood. When sober he was a quiet and 
peaceable youth, mild and pleasant in his manners, but, when intoxicated, wild and 
reckless. -Since his confinement in the prison I have had no personal knowledge 
of his conduct, but from the best information I can obtain from those who have the 
best opportunities of observing it, I learn that it has been exemplary, and that he 
has thoroughly reformed. This being the case, I think he is a proper subject for 
executive clemency." 

The prosecuting attorney has deceased. As usual in a case of this nature, oppo- 
sition to the exercise of clemency was aroused among the friends of the deceased 
when this application was supposed to have been made by the friends of the pris- 
oner. It having now been removed to my satisfaction, its history is not important 
to this decision. My predecessor made two adverse decisions, namely, February l y 
1875, and December 18, 1876. Since the latter date the application has acquired 
much strength, and has lost to a great extent its obnoxious elements. 

Under date of November 8, 1877, Governor Hendricks says: 

"If the duty to act still rested upon me, I would yield to the appeals of the 
people and of mercy." 

Many good reasons for favorable action upon the case are now urged before 
me and accepted as sufficient. The doubt of the defendant's guilt which arose after 
his conviction has not been dissipated, but has rather increased. His offense was 
reduced from the grade of murder to manslaughter, because of the absence of 
malice and purpose to kill the deceased, but his intent to kill any one is not clear 
He has been imprisoned nearly ten years, which is equal to one-third of his life. 
His conduct in the prison has been uniformly good during that long time. A 
former, and the present, chaplain have been much interested in his case, and are 
assured of his reformation. James Keigwin, director, and Andrew J. Howard 
warden, say: 

" Clark's behavior and conduct has been such since his incarceration here as to 
show a total reformation, and I [we] believe, if pardoned, would make a good and 
useful citizen, and have no doubt that executive clemency could not be more 
worthily bestowed." 

The sentiment of the community in which the crime was committed, and of the 
citizens of Washington, Floyd, Crawford and other counties, is communicated to 
me by the individual letters of gentlemen in official station and of high character 
in private life. It is expressed by one, now deceased, as follows: 

"As you are aware, 1 am thoroughly acquainted with the people of that county 
it having been the place of my first residence in Indiana. I am also fully-advised 
of all the circumstances of the killing of Telle. The fatal shot was not aimed at 
Telle, toward whom Clark had no ill feeling whatever, but was aimed at my own 
nephew, B. V. Dunham, who earnestly desires the pardon of Clark, and at whose 
request I write. In his wish I most heartily join. Clark is a prepossessing, 
promising young man. He had been led into intemperate courses, and had had a 
falling out with my nephew, as youngsters will, but nothing of a serious nature. 



52 

When he shot at him and killed Telle, Clark was much excited by liquor. I think, 
and so I believe most of the citizens of Washington county think, he has been suf- 
ficiently punished for his youthful indiscretion. I am informed that his prison 
record is good. I feel and fully believe he is thoroughly reformed, and if par- 
doned will make a useful citizen. I hope you will give his case a favorable con- 
sideration. I have no interest in the matter whatever beyond the public good." 

It is clearly my duty to yield to the opinion of so many friends of the young 
man, in the hope that their fond wishes for his future success may be realized by 
an upright and useful life in his chosen western home. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

6. Frank Radcliff, who was convicted in the Shelby Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 31st day of May, 1876, to be impris- 
oned for the term of three years. Pardoned January 9, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The petition 
is signed by the judge, prosecuting attorney and clerk of the court, the sheriff, 
auditor, recorder and other reputable citizens of Shelby county. They ask execu- 
tive clemency for the following reasons: "First, the said Radcliff has lived in 
this county a long time, and has always borne a good character previous to the 
charges upon which he was convicted. Second, while we believe him guilty of the 
crime charged, we think the "same was his first offense, and we believe him suffi- 
ciently punished, and that the ends of justice would be best served by his release. 
Thirdly, and the most important reason for his release is , that he has a large and 
helpless family, consisting of a wife and four children, all helpless, the oldest of 
the children being under nine years of age, and the youngest but a babe. That 
the whole family is a county charge. That during all the time the said Radcliff 
[was] with his family he supported his family, and we believe with his liberation 
he will again take charge of his family and conduct himself as a good citizen, and 
as he did uniformly before the unhappy occurrence for which he was convicted." 
I had fixed upon the last of December for action upon the case thus made. The 
prisoner had then served nineteen months. In reply to my request the warden 
reported as follows: 

"The conduct of convict Frank Radcliff has been, in a general way, good. He 
was twice reported for slight violations of prison rules, but I think him worthy of 

a pardon. 

Andrew J. Howard, Warden. 
To the Governor." 

Ten davs have now elapsed, and a pardon will issue. 

J J. D. W. 

7. John Watson, who was convicted in the Tippecanoe Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of rape, and sentenced, on the 20th day of August, 1872, to be 
imprisoned for the term of ten years. Pardoned January 9, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The 
petition, dated December 3, 1875, is signed by seven jurors and other reputable 
citizens, and recommends a pardon "for the reason, with others, that he has been 
sufficiently punished for the offense committed, having now served over three 
years of his term of ten for which he was sentenced." An attorney of Lafayette 
writes me: 



53 

"I have had occasion to investigate this case, and I am convinced that it would 
he meritorious if you would grant the prayer of the petition." 

The sheriff of Tippecanoe county wrote me on May 21, last, saying: 

"I have some knowledge of the many petitions sent you for pardons, hut in the 
case of John Watson, I am well acquainted with the prisoner, and the full history 
of the case. I am also, personally acquainted with Miss Hill, the prosecuting wit- 
ness, and have heen from her infancy; also, with her father and mother, and from 
what I know personally, Watson would not have had any reason to commit a rape 
on her, and think that there was a conspiracy "brought against him hy his wife to 
have him convicted to obtain a divorce from him to get to marry another man, 
which she done in a very short time afterwards. Watson has always been a hard 
working man, but an intemperate one, and was drunk at the time charged of com- 
mitting this crime. He has already been severely punished for nearly five years, 
and that being more than than the average punishment for that crime, I would 
therefore beg your mercy, and hope you may grant him a pardon, believing that 
if the whole matter could be fairly brought before you, you would not hesitate, 
and knowing the feeling of the community at large, and a majority of the jurors 
who tried the case and heard the evidence, that you would grant his pardon. I 
feel this my duty in addressing you this letter in his behalf." 

The warden reported, May 23, 1877: 

"The behavior of John Watson during his confinement in this prison has been 
unexceptionable. There is no report against him during the whole time, (nearly five 
years,) upon the books of the institution." 

The prisoner has labored under some difficulties to present his application. 
The warden in a recent letter in his behalf says: 

"I feel an interest in the case, for I believe it is one of merit." 

More than half the term has now been served. If guilty at all, under the cir- 
cumstances, the defendant has been sufficiently punished. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

8. Ktjdolph Lostettkr, who was convicted in the Jefferson Circuit Ccurt of 
the crime of burglary, and sentenced, on the 20th day of December, 1876, to be im- 
prisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned January 10, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. This 
application was made in January, 1877. The petition of the jurors shows: 

"That the prisoner was in his seventeenth year; that he committed the crime, 
and was indicted and convicted with an older companion; that the offense con- 
sisted in entering a grocery, and taking tobacco, cigars, and money, amounting in 
all to, perhaps, ten dollars, the owner not being certain as to the exact amount of 
her loss; that this defendant returned a part of the cigars next day, and gave an 
account of the transaction, and that both were convicted mainly upon their own 
confessions." 

They also say: 

"According to the testimony of several disinterested witnesses, young Lostetter 
had, previous to said offense, enjoyed a good reputation for industry, sobriety, and 
honesty, and, we were induced to think, was probably led into the offense by his 



54 

older and more experienced accomplice; " that they would willingly have imposed 
a lighter punishment if allowed by law, and recommend a pardon at the end of 
six or twelve months. 

Several county officers, and the present prosecuting attorney, concur and add, 
" that we [ they ] are credibly informed, his family are mainly dependent on his 
labor for support, his parents being old and poor, and his father a cripple." A 
petition is also made by respectable citizens of Madison. Former employers bear 
testimony to his good character before his conviction. The prosecuting attorney 
recommends a pardon : 

"First. Because the prisoner is not yet eighteen years of age. Second. Because 
it is his first conviction, and his former character for industry and honesty is said 
to have been good." 

The judge favors a pardon. More than twelve months have been served, and 
the prisoner's conduct is reported good. The pardon is now granted. 

J. D. W. 

9. John Fowler, who was convicted in the Wayne Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 9th day of May, 1876, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned January 14, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. More than 
twenty months of the term have been served. The warden reports that his con- 
duct has been good. The petition is signed by a large number of citizens of 
Wayne county, including the clerk, auditor, and treasurer, and bases a prayer 
for pardon upon the facts: that the defendent committed the crime while he was 
intoxicated; that it was his first offense; that his deportment in prison has been 
uniformly good; and that he has given evidence of reformation. The pardon is 
granted. J. D. W. 

Supplemental Decision : By the Governor. Upon receipt of the pardon, but before 
its delivery to the convict, the warden has reported to me as follows : 

" John Fowler is a painter, and has been employed as such during the past 
eight months in finishing goods in the paint room of one of the contractors for 
convict labor. This room has not been guarded, nor have the three or four con- 
victs employed there been under the watch of a foreman of work. They have 
been relied upon as good men and trusted with the care of property and to do 
their work properly without much attention being paid to them. Prior to and 
while so trusted Fowler made a good record and secured the confidence of the 
prison officers and contractors, and it was upon such record that the warden repre- 
sented to the Governor that his conduct had been good. To-day, however, it 
transpires that while he was thus employed and trusted he appropriated to himself 
about twenty-five dollars' worth of the manufacturer's material and tools, such as 
transfer pictures, gold bronzes, fine brushes, etc., a part of which was smuggled 
out of the prison by him through a contractor's teamster, to be delivered to him 
after his discharge, while the balance was secreted in a chest with false bottom and 
false lid, and came to light upon inspecting the chest before permitting him to 
bring it out of the prison at the time when he was about to be discharged under 
his pardon. Such conduct is a serious breach of prison discipline, and evidences a 
want of integrity that renders him, in my opinion, unworthy of executive clem- 
ency. Had as much been known a few days earlier it would not have been repre- 
sented to the Governor that his conduct has been good." 



55 

I concur in the warden's opinion upon the facts disclosed hy him. The pardon 
as revoked and will he returned to the secretary of state for cancellation. 

J. D. W. 

10. Robert Baird, who was convicted in the Vanderburgh Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of burglary, and sentenced on the 12th day of December, 1876, 
to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned January 15, 1878, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. 
More than thirteen months have been served. The warden reports that his con- 
duct has been good. A pardon is asked by the widowed mother of the prisoner. 
The offense was committed in Posey county. She says that he was "convicted 
upon the testimony of disreputable women, who prosecuted him on account of a 
quarrel between them and the said Robert Baird." Respectable citizens of Posey 
county, and the judge of the court in which he was convicted, have asked that her 
petition be favorably entertained. The circumstances of the crime, as narrated to 
me by credible persons, were peculiarly aggravating to the defendant, and exten- 
uate his guilt. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

11. Albert E. Williamson, who was convicted in the Warrick Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 16th day of January, 1874, to 
be imprisoned for the term of five years. Pardoned January 24, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. Four 
years have now been served, and the warden reports that the prisoner's conduct 
has been very good. This application was made July 31, 1877. It is supported 
by petitions of citizens of Warrick county, in which they say "that the larceny for 
which the said Albert E. Williamson was convicted was against the property of 
his father, by selling a horse belonging to his father and appropriating the pro- 
ceeds to his own use, and on being arraigned at his father's instance plead guilty 
to the charge and was sentenced by the court to five years' imprisonment. That 
his father, Thomas Williamson, has since departed this life, repenting his son's 
imprisonment, and has left his said son an equal heir-at-law with the residue of his 
children to his estate." The judge adds: 

" This I believe the only case where I sent a minor to the penitentiary. I am 
credibly informed that he has reformed. If so, I think his remaining longer in 
the penitentiary would be unnecessary and an injury to him. I think he ought to 
be pardoned." 

The present judge says: 

"If the above petition is true, then I favor it; otherwise, no." 

The prosecuting attorney adds : 

"1 eoncur with Judge Handy." 

Hon. B. S. Fuller, in a letter received with the papers, says : 

" The matters stated in the petition are true." 

The defendant was but nineteen years of age when sentenced. He has been 
.sufficiently punished. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

12. William Arnold, who was convicted in the Spencer Circuit Court of 
the crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 27th day of April, 1877, to be 



56 

imprisoned for the term of one year. Pardoned January 31, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. This 
application was commenced September 14, 1877, by a petition as follows: 

"To his Excellency, the Governor of Indiana: 

The last legislature changed the time for holding court in Spencer county, making 
the term begin one week later than under the old law. The new law contained aa 
emergency, and took effect before we had any knowledge of it whatsoever. Thus, 
ignorantly, we began the last April term one week earlier than provided for. 
During this week one William Arnold, a young man, was indicted, tried and con- 
victed of stealing four chickens, and sentenced to the State's prison for one year. 
Being indicted, tried and convicted in a court that had no jurisdiction (or rather 
in no court at all,) we are of the opinion that his imprisonment is illegal, and 
believing that he has already been punished sufficiently, we recommend to your 

Excellency that he be pardoned. 

G. L. Reinhard, Prosecuting Attorney. 

J. B. Handy, Judge. 

James Romine, Clerk. 

John Wollen, S. S. C. 

Anthony Stevenson, Ex. S. S. C. 

Rockport, Ind., August 22, 1877." 

In a letter enclosing the petition the prosecuting attorney says: 

"I feel as though this man ought to be pardoned, for, although the evidence was 
positive against him by two eye-witnesses, yet he protested his innocence so posi- 
tively and consistently that I am not satisfied but that the witnesses might have 
been mistaken as to his identity. Besides, it was a very trivial offense, and, as he 
has no doubt already suffered a great deal, I think justice would be subserved by 
pardoning him." 

Three-fourths of the year have been served. The warden reports: ''The con- 
duct of convict Arnold has been good." The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

13. Smith N. Fowler, who was convicted in the Dearborn Circuit Court of 
the crime of fornication, and sentenced, at the November term, 1877, to be impris- 
oned for the term of sixty days. Pardoned January 31, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the jail of Dearborn county. Decision: By the Governor. This case- 
is the successor of that of Nelson F. Hood. (Pardon No. 41, series of 1877.) 
Instantly upon conviction, I was appealed to by prominent and distinguished citi- 
zens of Cincinnati, the defendant's home, for his pardon. 

Hon. R. M. Bishop, in a letter of December 6, 1877, says to me: 

"I have known Mr. Fowler many years; in fact he acted as salesman in the 
kouse of R. M. Bishop & Co. for several years, and whilst he sometimes did things 
that I should not have commended, I, however, don't hesitate to state that I con_ 
sidered him a clever, good-hearted man and law-abiding citizen, and can not 
believe Mr. Fowler would have married again had he not believed his divorce was 
a legal one. Mrs. Fowler will more fully present her husband's case, and I should 
be gratified to have you give the case your favorable consideration. Mr. F. is a 
poor man, without means; consequently, Mrs. F. hopes you will grant a full 
pardon." 



57 

Other citizens of Cincinnati and of Lawrenceburgh wrote in behalf of the pris- 
oner. The judge and prosecuting attorney, on the 10th of December, before 
the motion for a new trial was disposed of bj the special judge, wrote me adversely 
to the application. The special judge has written me as follows: 

* * "Although, under the law and the evidence, 1 not only overruled the 
defendant's motion for a new trial, but was clearly of opinion that ho was legally 
guilty and properly convicted by the jury, yet I would state that it was and is my 
conviction that the defendant really, in his own mind believed that he had obtained 
a valid divorce from his first wife, and that he contracted his second marriage and 
lived with the other woman in the belief that such second marriage was valid and 
the other woman his lawful wife. And though the law can not recognize such 
belief of the defendant as a valid defense to the charge of the offense with which he 
stood charged, and whereof he was convicted, yet I believe that such belief of the 
defendant is a matter highly proper to be considered by the Executive when 
appealed to for mercy in the diminution of the punishment or in the entire pardon 
of the defendant. Holding this view, and in the further view of all the circum- 
stances of the case of said Smith N. Fowler, I sincerely recommend him to your 
executive clemency, and join in the prayer for his pardon from further punishment, 
deeming the law fully vindicated, and the defendant already sufficiently punished. 

Most respectfully, 

John Schwartz." 

The county officers were of opinion that a part of the fine should be paid and 
the residue remitted. They now favor its remission. But a few days of the term 
remain to be served. The prisoner is in bad health, and becoming worse from 
confinement. Being destitute of means, his friends in Cincinnati have contributed 
enough to satisfy the costs and pay one hundred asd eighty dollars on the judg- 
ment. The pardon is granted and the residue of the fine will be remitted. 

J. D. W. 

14. James Convert, who was convicted in the Knox Circuit Court of the 
crime of assault and battery, and sentenced, at the September term, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of six months. Pardoned February 2, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the jail of Knox county. Decision : By the Governor. Respecta- 
ble citizens of Knox county, including the sheriff, treasurer and auditor, by an 
application received January 9, 1878, ask that the defendant be now released after 
service of more than half his term, and imprisonment continuously since June 19, 
1877. I requested of the Judge a statement of the facts of the case. He replied : 

"Tours of the 10th instant, relative to case of James Convery, is received. He 
was committed to jail in June last, on charge of assault and battery upon a little 
girl five years old, with intent to commit a rape. At September term of court, he 
was tried and convicted of the assault and battery by a jury, and adjudged to pay a 
fine of one hundred dollars, and be imprisoned in jail six months. He is a boy, 
some eighteen or nineteen years old, and destitute of any property. The circum- 
stances under which the offence was committed, in broad daylight, in a very public 
part of the city, indicated that he must have been intoxicated at the time. I under- 
stand that ordinarily, he is an honest and industrious boy, and is a tinner by trade, 
but occasionally gets on a spree. He has now been confined in jail seven months. 
I do not think that public justice requires that he should be confined on account of 
the fine, or that he is likely to be reformed in the society of hardened criminals^ 



58 

In view, therefore of his youth, his poverty and already long imprisonment, I 
have no hesitation in recommending the remission of the fine. 
Very truly, yours, 

N. F. Malott, 
Judge Knox Circuit Court." 

The pardon is granted, and a remittitur of the fine will issue. 

J. D. W. 

15. Jeannette Parsons, who was convicted in the Vigo Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of murder, and sentenced, on the 13th day of February, 1874, to be 
imprisoned for the term of her natural life. Pardoned February 6, 1878, and re- 
leased from confinement in the Female Prison and Keformatory Institution for 
Women and Girls. 

16. Mary Ann Sullivan, who was convicted in the Vigo Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of murder, and sentenced, on the 17th day of February, 1874, 
to be imprisoned for the term of her natural life. Pardoned February 6, 1878, 
and released from confinement in the Female Prison and Reformatory Institution for 
Women and Girls. Decision: By the Governor. This application for the pardon of these 
defendants was first made by a petition and accompanying papers, received August 
31, 1877. The petition is signed by officers and leading citizens of Vigo county. 
It shows, that the defendants were jointly indicted with Simeon [Simpson?] 
Woolen and Matthew Sullivan; that Woollen was first tried by a jury and con- 
victed and sentenced for life, after which the defendants were separately tried and 
convicted by a jury, and sentenced as above stated; that the evidence, at the time, 
seemed to support the verdict, but afterwards, upon the trial of Matthew Sullivan, 
new and important testimony was produced on his behalf, which resulted in a 
disagreement of the jury as to to the truth of the bill of indictment, and that pris- 
oner's discharge from custody upon his own recognizance; that he (Sullivan), has 
since died of disease contracted in jail, after having, on his death bead, made a 
solemn statement to his father and mother, brothers and sisters, and attending 
priest, that he was innocent of the charge, and that all the other prisoners were 
likewise innocent. "It was likewise developed in the last trial that the principal 
witnesses for the State, and the witnesses who testified to the infliction of the inju- 
ries upon the deceased (Ward) by the defendants, were all persons of bad repute, 
and were prostitutes of the lowest character, and were perions of bad reputation 
for truth and veracity; that the case of the said Jeannette Parsons and Ann Sulli- 
van was the same and identical with that of Matthew Sullivan, and they were no 
more guilty of the crime of the murder of John Ward than said Sullivan, who 
was virtually acquitted of the charge. There are, we think, very grave doubts as 
to whether either of said prisoners are guilty." Because of their supposed innocence 
and their lady-like and becoming manner since imprisoned, a pardon oi each is 
recommended by the petitioners. A prominent attorney of the bar adds this to his 
signature : 

"I heard all the evidence, and believe them not guilty of crime charged." 

The foreman of the jury who tried Jeannette Parsons adds : 

" I have read the above' petition, and in view of the facts therein stated, and 
that so many good citizens of Terre Haute and Vigo county have signed, and the 
great probability that they are innocent, I sign this petition that justice may be 
done." 



59 

Nine others of the Parsons jury add their names. It is said " the other two 
jurors can not be found, one of them having left the State." The foreman of the 
grand jury adds his signature. A full statement of the case is made by the pros- 
ecuting attorney. He hopes that pardons may be granted. Other official state- 
ments are made at considerable length by officers and counsel. Hon. D. W. Voor- 
hees has written me to the effect that he is " satisfied, and always was, that these 
parties are all innocent of the crime of which they have been convicted," and 
recommending that I "pardon and set at liberty these much-abused and unfor- 
tunate women." Judge Long wrote under date of July 27, 1877, referring to his 
very full and elaborate statement on file in Woollen's case, now pending, for the 
facts of the crime and convictions, and concluding as follows: 

"As I then stated to Governor Hendricks that I would not willingly lay a 
straw in the way of a pardon to Woollen, so I will now say to your Excellency in 
reference to the present application. It is the firm belief of the counsel engaged 
in defending Matthew Sullivan, the last of the persons tried for this offense, that 
these parties are not guilty of the crime ; and in view of the possibility that this 
may be so, and for the reason that they have already suffered much I would be 
glad if the pardon asked for should be granted." 

The lady managers, superintendent and matron of the prison have taken great 
interest in presenting this case, and inform me that the conduct of the prisoners 
has been exemplary, and that in their opinion it shows a reformation. I have had 
several interviews with them relative to the facts of their case, and have endeavored 
to reach a conclusion that would be entirely satisfactory to my own mind before 
yielding to the earnest appeals in their behalf. I am now convinced that they are 
innocent and should be set at liberty. The pardons are granted. • 

J. D. W. 

17. Charles D. Harris, who was convicted in the Monroe Circuit Court of 
the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 5th day of May, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned February 7, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. This 
application was commenced July 9, 1877, by a petition of jurors, county officers 
and attorneys. They recommend a pardon for the reasons that they now believe 
the defendant ''was guilty of no intentional violation of the law," and has been 
sufficiently punished, and is fully penitent. A protest was made by the owners of 
the goods taken, and, subsequently, a formal remonstrance of citizens of Blooming- 
ton was filed. The judge, at my request, made a careful re-examination of the 
facts after the application was opposed, and, in his letter to me, says : 

"I have been at Bloomington, and made such inquiry and investigation as was 
practicable during my short visit, both as to the facts asserted in behalf of the 
petition and in the remonstrance against it. I have learned no facts in regard to 
the crime itself, or to Harris' connection with it, not revealed at the trial. I was 
at that time satisfied that the jury returned the proper verdict in relation to the 
question of guilt. Under the testimony, they could not have found otherwise. 
While the witnesses who testified directly to his guilt are now convicts, and were 
of extremely bad character, and while, upon their unsupported testimony, I should 
not feel safe in declaring guilt, yet defendant himself so far corroborated them by 
his story as demonstrated that he was, to some extent at least, a participant in the 
crime charged. I thought then, and yet believe, that while he was legally a prin- 
cipal in the crime, yet morally he was the least guilty of those participating, and 
that, looking at the crime from the sole standpoint of the evidence on the trial, 



60 

.there are some strong mitigating circumstances in his favor. Had the jury pos- 
sessed any power to fix the punishment at a less period than two years, I think it 
would have been their duty to do so. As it was, they were compelled by the 
evidence to find the defendant guilty and, by the law, to assess a punishment of at 
least two years. I should have affixed a penalty of from six to twelve months' 
imprisonment had the law submitted the matter to me for determination, and I 
would recommend his pardon after he shall have been imprisoned eight or ten 
months. I am assuming that his story in regard tohispast life [is] true, that this 
is his first offense, and that he was seeking employment, and not on a mere tramp 
for the purposes of crime. Of course you can readily ascertain these matters from 
the references submitted to you by his friends. If his confinement is seriously 
affecting his health so as to threaten permanently to disable him, I would join in a 
request for his immediate pardon. 

I am, very truly, etc., 

John C. Kobinson." 

The prosecuting attorney has also written me quite favorably to the prisoner. 
In conclusion he says: 

"I am sure this young man has already been punished three-fold for the crime 
he committed, if guilty of crime at all, and therefore cheerfully recommend him to 
your Excellency for pardon." 

I have deferred action until the remonstrants could be given an opportunity to 
reconsider their objections to a pardon. On January 14, a petition, signed by two 
hundred and forty persons, was received. A comparison of names by persons- 
acquainted with them discloses the signatures of a large number of those who 
signed the remonstrance. They, and many others, now recommend a pardon. 
Four gentlemen who were guarding the jail when Beatty, Rutledge, Alexander 
and Harris were arrested upon the charge of burglary and lodged in jail, in a letter 
to me, say: 

"During their confinement in jail, all of them, on several occasions, stated and 
declared in our presence and that of the sheriff, that Harris was entirely innocent, 
and had nothing to do with the burglary, but had drank the whisky taken from 
the saloon they entered, without knowing where it came from or how it was 
obtained. Kutledge, a short time before his trial, after having repeatedly exoner- 
ated Harris, said if he went to the penitentiary all would have to go. He was the 
only witness who testified against Harris." 

The prison officers have given highly favorable reports of the prisoner's con- 
duct and apparent reformation. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

18. Frank Flynn, who was convicted in the Laporte Circuit Court of the crime 
of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 18th day of September. 1876, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned February 8, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The prison 
officers have recommended that the prisoner be pardoned. In their letter they say . 

" The offense was breaking into the store of C. T. Dibble, in Michigan City, and 
stealing some boots and shoes. Flynn admits his guilt, but says he was out of 
money, could get no work, was among strangers and had nothing to eat, Flynn 
is now about twenty-six years of age; has been an obedient prisoner ; while here, 
his conduct has been unexceptionably good, and has worked as long, or longer, 



61 

than he was able ; his heajth is very poor, being afflicted with a pulmonary disease 
which, at best, gives him but a short lease of life. (See physician's report accom- 
panying this.) Flynn desires to be relieved to go home to his father and mother in 
Massachusetts, to die. Mr. Dibble, the injured party, is desirous that you should 
extend your clemency to Flynn. We submit to your Excellency that he has suf- 
ficiently atoned for the offense committed, and that, while humanity prompts the 
act of pardon, public justice will not suffer." 

This recommendation is appended : 

" I am the person from whom Flynn stole the" property, and do fully concur ia 
the above recommendation of the officers of the prison. 

Cephas T. Dibble." 

The physician says : 

" He is in the hospital, and has been off duty for several months on account of 
sickness. He is in the last stages of consumption and undoubtedly cannot live till 
the expiration of his sentence." 

The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

19. Leok De LaForer, who was convicted in the Tippecanoe Circuit Court 
of the crime of murder, and sentenced on the 2d day of November, 1866, to be 
imprisoned for the term of his natural life. Pardoned February 8, 1878, and re- 
leased from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. 
During a recent visit to the prison, in company with the auditor and treasurer of 
state, the case of this convict was brought before me by the prison officers. They 
have since reduced their statement to writing, and say : 

" Frank Pio was arrested for the same offense, but broke jail and escaped, was 
arrested again, tried, and sentenced for life on the 6th day of November, 1867, and 
was pardoned by Governor Hendricks, January 8, 1877. Leon De LaForer has 
never been able to perform any labor since his imprisonment here, on account of 
physical inability. (See the physician's statement enclosed herewith.) He is now 
advanced to the age of seventy years, a poor, broken down old man, on the verge 
of the grave. Always has been of a kind and congenial disposition here, obedient 
to all laws and rules of the prison ; has a wife and two children in Paris, France, 
where he wants to go, and says that the French Consul at Quebec, in Canada, will 
furnish him transportation to France. The physician says : 

" He is an old man, over seventy, and has been confined in the State t>rison for 
about twelve years. During that time, he has never done any work, and indeed, 
has been, and is now physically unable to accomplish an ordinary day's work. Has 
had lung fever and his lungs have been weak since then. "Was affected with 
rheumatism, severely, a few years ago which produced organic disease «f the heart. 
That organ is now enlarged and its action feeble, which renders him unable to per. 
form any manual labor for the remainder of his life." 

The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

20. John Sotttherland, who was convicted in the Montgomery Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 21st day of December, 1876 
to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned February 9, 1878, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. 



62 

After verdict and before judgment, namely, December. 12, 1876, this application 
was commenced by a petition of jurors, county officers and citizens, dated Deeem- 
ber 6, in which they urge a pardon for the reasons that, in their opinion, the 
defendant was drawn into the offense by others; that it was his first crime; that he- 
had always borne a good character for honesty, and that the ends of justice bad 
been attained and would not be subserved by his incarceration with hardened 
criminals. The property taken was a lard can worth fifty cents, lard worth six 
dollars, and meat worth one dollar and a half. The application was supported by 
a petition of the citizens of the neighborhood where the larceny was committed, 
including the person whose property was taken. Notice of a remonstrance was 
received, and action was delayed as requested. The formal statements of reasons 
were received December 12. Very full statements were filed by the defendant's 
counsel and prosecuting attorney. The sheriff was instructed to hold the prisoner 
in custody in his county and the judge was asked for a statement. On the 2d of 
January, 1877, my predecessor received from the judge a letter, giving his recom- 
mendation in the case and informing him that sentence had been pronounced. He 
thereupon refused to grant a pardon, and instructed the sheriff to execute the 
judgment. The prisoner has now served more than thirteen months. He is a 
young man, and left a wife and two children, who need his care. I have been 
urged to release him, and have been disposed to do so when the objections raised 
by the protests and letters should have been removed. This has now been accom- 
plished by the prisoner's friends in a petition, a withdrawal of the remonstrances 
by most of the signers, and a more favorable letter from the judge. The prison- 
er's conduct has been good. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

21. Thomas E. Hogan, who was convicted in the Eandolph Circuit Court of 
the crime of burglary, and sentenced on the 22d day of January, 1876, to be 
imprisoned for the term of three years. PardoDed February 9, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The first 
petition is made by friends of the prisoner in Cincinnati, and is indorsed by the 
mayor and prominent lawyers of that city. A recommendation has since been 
made by the judge and clerk of the court, the late and the present prosecuting 
attorney, and the auditor and recorder of Eandolph county, that the defendant be 
pardoned because that, so far as they know, this was his first offense, and that the 
punishment already suffered is sufficient. The misfortune has deeply afflicted the 
convict's mother, now about seventy-five years old, and gentlemen acquainted with 
the circumstances of the case regard it as one of great hardship to her and her 
family. Among the number is the attorney who assisted in the prosecution, and 
now thinks the defendant was led into the commission of the offense by older per- 
sons. More than two years of the term has been served, and the warden now 

reports his conduct erood. The pardon is granted. 
V J. D. W. 



22. George Graham, who was convicted in the Allen Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 29th day of May, 1873, to be 
disfranchised for the term of ten years. Pardoned February 21, 1878, and his right 
of suffrage as a citizen of this State remitted unto him. Decision: By the Governor. 
Upon conviction the defendant was sentenced to be imprisoned five years, dis- 
franchised ten years, and fined in the sum of one hundred dollars. In 1874 he 
applied for a pardon and release from imprisonment; but his application was then 



63 

refused. He has, by good conduct, gained his release from prison several months 
before the close of his term. He now asks restoration to citizenship and a remis- 
sion of the fine. The county officers, judges, prosecuting attorney and others 
indorse his application, and recommend that his prayer be granted. I am assured 
by the present prosecuting attorney, who heard the evidence, that the defendant 
was guilty of no felonious intent in the taking of the property, which was a mare 
belonging to Willard M. Vaughn. He used the horse to ride from the farm, where 
he had become very weary, into Fort Wayne, and there tied her, and she was 
found soon afterward by her owner. The gain of one hundred and fifty-five days 
is evidence of good conduct in prison. The pardon is granted, and the fine will be 
remitted. J. D. W. 

23. George Miles, who was convicted in the Perry Circuit Court of the 
crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 27th day of August, 1877, to be impris- 
oned for the term of one year. Pardoned February 28, 1878, and released from 
con finement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. Six months 
have now been served. The warden reports that the prisoner's conduct has been 
very good. The petition is made by ofiicers, attorneys and citizens of Perry 
county, including members of the grand and petty jury. The offense charged was 
the taking of two sheaves of oats of the aggregate value of two and one-half 
cents ! The prisoner has a wife now very sick with consumption, and they have two 

little children. The case is a deplorable one. It is claimed that the defendant was 
unjustly convicted, and the facts seem to show that he is the victim of a petty spite 
at once indecent and inhuman. 

The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

24. David Williams, who was convicted in the Gibson Circuit Court of the 
crime of manslaughter, and sentenced, on the 3d day of March, 1876, to be impris- 
oned for the term of three years. Pardoned March 2d, 1878, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. The prisoner has 
now served two years, and the warden reports that his conduct has been very good 
The application for his pardon is made by his father and mother, who say, " that 
previous to his incarceration in said prison, he was troubled with an affection of 
the lungs ; that since his said imprisonment, the said affection has increased, and 
that if he is kept in prison the full term of three years, he will be beyond the hope 
of recovery." 

A physician's certificate supports this statement. Citizens of the county, of re- 
spectability and high standing, recommend that the prayer be granted. A state. 
ment of the evidence has been furnished by the prosecuting attorney. Under the 
circumstances shown, especially the bad health of the defendant, the punishment 
seems adequate to the offence. 

The pardon is granted. 

25. John Baker, who was convicted in the Jefferson Circuit Court of the 
crime of rape, and sentenced, on the 27th day of September, 1874, to be imprisoned 
for the term of seven years. Pardoned March 2, 1878, and released from confine, 
ment in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. This application was 
commenced September 8, 1875, by a petition of citizens of Jefferson county. It 
was supported by other papers, but the facts were not disclosed to the satisfaction 
of my predecessor, and, upon examination of the case, March 22, 1876, he refused 



64 

to grant a pardon. The case is now fully and very satisfactorily presented by 
additional statements of facts and official recommendations. 

The judge, in, concluding his letter, says: 

''The prosecuting witness is a woman of some character, and the only question 
I have had is as to whether she was mistaken in the persons who committed the 
outrage. If she was, the defendant ought to be at liberty; if not, he did not get 
too much." . 

John W. Linck, Esq., a member of the bar of Jefferson county, and now a 
director of the prison, wrote me, February 26, 1877, as follows: 

" In the matter of application for the pardon of John Baker, I would respect- 
fully state that I heard the original trial, and facts afterwards came to my knowl- 
edge which satisfied me beyond question that Baker did not commit the offense for 
which he was convicted. The parties who actually committed the crime were 
Tonv Lostetter and Norman Shaffer. The brother of Shaffer told me of facts 
and circumstances which convinced me beyond question of his guilt; besides, 
Norman Shaffer has admitted it to several parties. Mr. Charles L. Jewett, the 
prosecuting attorney, is now convinced that Baker is not guilty, and will join in 
askino - his pardon. John Baker had been a bad, trifling boy, and his application 
could not receive any consideration for previous good conduct; but it is terrible to 
think of a man serving out a term of six years for a crime which he did not 
commit. It is the very general opinion that Baker is not guilty, and it has a very 
demoralizing effect, and creates a disrespect for the law and courts." 

The directors, warden, physician, clerk and deputy warden have written me 
that the defendant has been an exceedingly good man in the prison, and say: 

"He has been uniformly quiet and orderly in his demeanor, has been trusted as 
onlv one in whom the management had the utmost confidence as to his integrity 
of character could have been trusted. It is not doubted that, if pardoned, he would 
make a very good citizen. * * * * With the understanding that there are 
petitions for the pardon of said Baker on file in the Governor's office, we volun- 
tarily, and unsolicited, as a simple act of justice to a worthy man. join in the prayer 
for executive clemency in his case, and so will ever pray." 

Charles L. Jewett, Esq., writes: 

."I was prosecuting attorney of Jefferson county at the time John Baker was 
coavicted of rape, and I concur in the statement of facts on file with his applicatioa 
for pardon, and join in the prayer for such pardon." 

C. A. Eorbly, Esq., writes, by request, as follows. 

"He [Baker] was jointly indicted with one Anthony Lostetter, but had a sep- 
arate trial. But little effort was made in his behalf. I was employed to defend 
Lostetter. I learned that the woman on whom the rape was charged to have beea 
committed had a very bad character — her reputation for truth and chastity was 
bad. I had no difficulty in impeaching her testimony, and Lostetter was acquitted. 
I heard her evidence. Even if Baker had been guilty of the attempt — it was only 
an attempt that she swore to — he has sufficiently atoned for it by the length of his 
imprisonment. But Lostetter was found not guilty. The woman's testimony was 
contradictory and somewhat improbable, and it is exceedingly doubtful if the pris- 
oner, Baker, was guilty at all. I join, therefore, in the prayer that you extend to 
him your executive clemency." 



65 

Other reliable evidence of the defendant's innocence is furnished me. The 
pardon is granted. J. i). W. 

26. Cyrus Albertson, who was convicted in the Wayne Circuit Court of the 
crime of burglary, and sentenced on the 9th day of May, 1870, to be imprisoned 
for the term of two years. Pardoned March 4, 1878, and released from confine- 
ment in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner having 
conducted himself very well in prison, as reported by the warden, has gained 
more tuan a month of good time, and has but thirty days yet to serve. I am asked 
to pardon him to-day. The petition is signed by respectable citizens of Wayne 
couniy. In their opinion he has now been sufficiently punished, and no good pur- 
pose can be subserved by keeping him longer confined in prison. The nature of 
the oiiense is assigned as a second reason, as follows: 

"Second, because we are informed that the evidence on the trial showed that 
he, with the assistance ot others, entered a saloon in .Richmond in which he, the 
same evening, had been drinking, and was found therein in a state of intoxication, 
nothing having been taken, and upon these facts he was convicted." 

The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

27. James Smith, who was convicted in the Grant Circuit Court of the crime 
of murder, and sentenced on the 19th day of September, 1874, to be imprisoned 
for the term of his natural life. Pardoned March 7, 1878, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The petition 
received June 7, 1877, is signed by officers and citizens of Grant county and ten of 
the jury. The prisoner is a colored man. The judge of the court has made me 
the following statement: 

"Huntington, Ind., May 28, 1877. 

Governor James D. Williams: 

I am requested to ask a pardon for James Smith, convicted of the crime of 
murder in the Grant Circuit Court at the September term, 1874, and sentenced to 
the State Prison for life. He is a man of a very low grade of intellect, scarcely 
more than responsible for his conduct, closely approaching idiocy. He was indicted 
along with one JDaniel West, a negro, for the murder of one Ahab McNath, also a 
negro. The facts disclosed by the evidence in the case showed that West alone 
done the murdering; that Smith, in consideration of the promise of the payment 
to him by West of fifty dollars, accompanied West and held West's horse while 
the murder was being perpetrated. They were both convicted and sentenced for 
life. Smith went upon the stand as a witness and disclosed the whole thing. I 
thought at the time I tried the case that he was not much more than responsible, 
and was not deserving of so terrible a penalty. His character was shown to be 
that of a peaceable, quiet creature, and one who had his confidence could persuade 
him to anything, and in this way West induced him to accompany him in his mur- 
derous expedition. I understand that the jury have, or will, recommend his par- 
don. I see nothing to be gained by continuing him in the penitentiary, as I feel 
sure, of himself, he is entirely harmless. In view of all the facts and circum- 
stances surrounding the case I respectfully ask that he be pardoned. 
I have the h onor to be, 

Very respectfully, 

James E. Slack." 
5 Pardons. 



68 

Dr. L. P Hess makes a certificate that he is well acquaii;ted with Smith, and 
that he was his physician for a considerable time prior to his conviction, and that 
he was a person of unsound mind and well calculated to he influenced and over- 
awed by a person of the nerve and will of Daniel "West. A petition of colored 
men of Grant county has been presented in behalf of the prisoner. The prose- 
cuting attorney recommends a pardon, and says: 

"I prosecuted the cases, and know all the facts. Smith is a person whose mind 
is barely on the side of sanity. The murder committed by his co-deff ndant, West, 
was most inhuman. Smith was present through duress and a naked, empty promise 
of twenty-five dollars for keeping West company. No proof of his guilt was shown 
except his own admissions, and he either had to go wholly acquit or be found 
guilty of murder in the first degree. I have always been willing to add my word 
in his behalf, and as his neighbors of Grant county think the ends of justice are 
met in his case, I readily add my request to theirs that your Excellency pardon 
him." 

The warden says: 

"The conduct of the within named convict, James Smith, is unexceptionably 
good, and, in my judgment, he is a fit subject for executive clemency, being of weak 
mind, and apparently harmless." The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

28. Charles Ott, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court of 
the crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 7th day of September, 1877, to 
be imprisoned for the term of one year. Pardoned March 7, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. This 
application is made by the father of the prisoner. He says, that before the 
offense his son had borne a good character for honesty, and no charge had been 
made against him; that he and his wife have nine other children, and need his help 
in their support; and that the punishment suffered, and disgrace brought upon his 
parents and brothers and sisters will forever hereafter deter said Charles from 
felony. The judge, prosecuting attorney, county officers, and respectable citizens 
recommend that the prayer of the petition be granted. Six months have now been 
served. His conduct has been good. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

29. Henry F. A. Metssel, who was convicted in the Vigo Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 27th day of October, 
1874, to be imprisoned for the term of four years. Pardoned March 8, 1878, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. 
This application was commenced by a petition, received August 10, 1876, which 
is signed by officers and citizens of Vigo county, whose recommendation is entitled 
to respect. But a few months of the term remain. The warden reports the pris- 
oner's conduct good. 1 am informed that during his imprisonment he has lost one 
eye, and that the sight of the other is much impaired. The judge of the court, 
who is very careful in his recommendations, recommends that a pardon be granted. 
The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

30. Charlvs H. Warren, who was convicted in the Parke Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 8th day of June, 1876, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned March 14, 1878, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governm: The prosecuting 



67 \ 

witness, ten jurors and some citizens, by petitions received June 18, 1877, ask that 
the defendant be pardoned. A copy of the indictment shows that he was jointly 
indicted with Samuel Ellison, for that they did "unlawfully and feloniously steal 
take and carry away, four chickens, one ham of meat, three sides of pickled pork, 
all of the value of ten dollars, all of the personal goods and chatties of James 
Crabb." 

The clerk of the court recommends that he be now pardoned, and says: 

" At the time the otfence was committed, the defendant was under the influence 
of intoxicating liquor to a considerable extent." 

The prosecuting attorney who secured the conviction, concurs in the recom- 
mendation of the clerk. 

The warden reports : 

"The within named, Charles H. Warren, has been a good man in the prison. He 
is a good mechanic, industrious and persevering. His wife, with a small child, 
dependent upon charity for support, resides in the neighborhood of the prison. 
Further punishment would not make him a better man, while his pardon would be 
a very great blessing to his poor wife and child." 

He has now served more than twenty-one months. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

31. John West, who was convicted in the Allen Criminal Circuit Court of 
the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 19th day of March, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned March 21, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The 
petition was received September 28, 1877, and asks a pardon because of the prison- 
er's previous honesty, and because he was intoxicated when he committed this 
crime. Some members of the bar who were present at the trial express their 
belief that the evidence tended to show that West had been led into the crime by 
his co-defendant, Charles Cordt. The sheriff has written me, saying: 

"Owing to the perfectly destitute condition of his wife, and the fact that she 
has a large family of children on her hands which must become public charges if 
her husband remains in prison, and that he was induced by another, now in prison, 
to commit the crime, I, with others, join in asking his pardon." 

The prosecuting attorney, at my request, has made me a statement of the facts 
of the case, from which it appears that Cordt is an old criminal who, being a fugi- 
tive from the justice of Ohio, came into this State and persuaded this defendant to 
assist him in the larceny. 

One year has now been served. The warden reports his conduct good. The 
punishment is sufficient. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

32. Peter Plunket, who was convicted in the Wayne Circuit Court of the 
crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 19th day of September, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of one year. Pardoned March 21, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. This 
application was commenced by a petition received November 28, 1877. The recom- 
mendation, added by the judge, is as follows: 

" I tried the above cause, and am still of the opinion that he was guilty beyond 



68 

a reasonable doubt; but I believe tbat punishment by imprisonment in the State 
prison for one year is too severe in his case, and that the exercise of the executive 
clemency in his behalf would be proper." 

The judge of the superior court of the county says: 

"I heard the above case while it was being tried, and concur in the opinion 
that said Plunket has been sufficiently punished." 

The prosecuting attorney reccommends a pardon. The prosecuting witness, the 
county officers and other citizens 'think Plunket has been sufficiently punished, 
and should be pardoned." One-half the term has now expired. 

The warden reports that the prisoner's conduct has been good. The pardon is 
granted. J. D. W. 

33. Benedict Miller, who was convicted in the Shelby Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 4th day of June, 1875, to be disfran- 
chised for the term of five years. Pardoned March 23, 1878, and his right of 
suffrage as a citizen of this State remitted unto him. Decision: By the Governor. 
The defendant was sentenced to the State prison for two years. Having served 
that term and conducted himself well, he asks to be relieved of his disfranchise- 
ment. The prosecuting attorney and county officers have, at my request, examined 
the case, and recommend favorable action. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

34. Charles P. Curtis, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of embezzlement, and sentenced, on the 26th day of October, 
1877, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned March 27, 1878, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. 
This application is made by a large number of petitions, all in the following 
language: 

"To his Excellency, James D. Williams, Governor of the State of Indiana: 

We, the undersigned, would respectfully petition your Excellency to issue a 
pardon to Charles P. Curtis, now confined in the State prison at Michigan city, for 
the crime of embezzlement Mr. Curtis has a wife and five children, some of 
whom are afflicted, and the eldest but nine years of age, and they are entirely des- 
titute of means, and we believe that a pardon now granted will confer a great 
blessing upon a helpless family; and we also believe his punishment already suf- 
fered is a sufficient atonement for his guilt, there having been no actual intent to 
defraud." 

The signers are citizens of Boone and Clinton county. Another petition, in 
like terms, is signed by L. M. Fitzhugh, who was the prosecuting witness, the 
county officers, some of the prominent business firms of this city, and by my imme- 
diate predecessors in office, Governor Baker and Governor Hendricks. 

The prosecuting attorney says: 

" Believing the purposes of punishment fully answered by that already suffered, 
I join in recommending a pardon." 

The judge of the court has signed a recommendation, which contains the fol- 
lowing statement of facts: 

" Charles P. Curtis was a salesman and traveling agent of L. M. Fitzhugh & 
Co., wholesale tobacco merchants in the city of Indianapolis; and while attending 



69 

to his business at Brazil, in this State, he was induced to risk his means and those 
of his employers in gambling. He was unsuccessful at play, and lost his emp'oyers' 
money, and, not desiring -to face them, he fled, and was arrested as before stated. 
Before fleeing, however, he made a full confession to his employers, and, when 
confronted in St. Louis, returned to Indianapolis without warrant or requisition. 
He is willing to make all the restitution in his power. He has a wife and five 
small children, one of whom is greaily afflicted, and who are destitute of all means 
of support. He has always been a sober and an industrious man, and of first-class 
business qualifications." 

The defendant's counsel have written me fully of the nature of the case. Five 
months have now been served. The warden reports that he knows of no reason 
against granting him a pardon, and that his conduct has been good. The pardon 
is granted. J. D. W. 

35. Morgan Carter, who was convicted in the Spencer Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 4th day of November, 1875, to be 
imprisoned for the term of four years. Pardoned March 30, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The 
petition was received August 23, 1877. It is made by three prosecuting witnesses, 
including the owner of the property, and the clerk, treasurer, sheriff and recorder 
of Spencer county. They say : 

"We base this request on the following facts: First. Morgan Carter is a 
young man, and was beyond doubt led into the offense by another party. The act 
charged was stealing an ox. The proof showed that Benoni Carter and others had 
been before engaged in killing cattle in the woods. That in this case Benoni Car- 
ter, John Dismon and defendant, Morgan Carter, killed an ox belonging to J. M. 
Gwathney, and hid the hide. The evidence as to Morgan Carter's guilt was not 
perfectly clear, and be was shown to have maintained a previously good character. 
Second. This, we are satisfied, was Morgan Carter's first offense. Third. A report 
had obtained currency that this killing of cattle was frequent in the neighborhood 
where the ox was killed. The previous killings were traceable to Benoni Carter; 
yet we have no doubt that this report served to greatly increase the defendant 
Carter's, punishment. "We should state Benoni Carter escaped and ran off, and 
John Dismon turned State's evidence, and was the principal witness for the State. 
It thus appears that the conviction was procured mainly on accomplices' testi- 
mony, and the punishment was influenced by extraneous circumstances before the 
jury. Fourth. Morgan Carter, being young and of good previous character, and 
having a wife and children, we think the time he has now served is ample punish- 
ment, and, for the above and other reasons, we ask that said Morgan Carter be 
pardoned." 

The judge adds: 

"I have examined the above petition. The statements are substantially true, 
and I believe the case of Morgan Carter is a proper one now for executive clem- 
ency. I was the judge that presided at the trial. D. T. Laird." 

More than one-half the term has now been served. The warden reports that 
"the conduct of Morgan Carter has been very good." The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 



70 

86. Harrison Grimes, who was convicted in the Johnson Circuit Court of 
the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 13th day of September, 1876, to 
he imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned March 30, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The 
petition is signed by the prosecuting attorney, the presiding judge, six jurors, four 
of the county officers, some attorneys and other citizens of Johnson county. They 
assign as reasons for the pardon that the defendant is only about twenty-four years 
of age; that he has a wife and child dependent upon him for support; that he had 
borne a good character before the offense; that he has been an orderly and submis- 
sive prisoner; and that in their opinion the punishment suffered has been sufficient 
to effect the object of the law in his reformation. The property taken was a small 
amount of clothes, not exceeding ten dollars in value. More than three-fourths of 
the term has been served. The warden reports that his conduct has been very 
good. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

37. James Foster, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of murder, and sentenced, on the 17th day of January, 1872, to be 
imprisoned for the term of his natural life. Pardoned April 3, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The 
application was commenced by a petition received August 28, 1878. It is signed 
by the Judge who presided at the trial, the prosecuting attorney, some of the 
jurors and prominent citizens of Marion county. In support of the reasons set 
forth, a statement of the evidence given on the trial and some affidavits were filed. 
It is claimed that facts disclosed since the conviction show the defendant's killing 
of Hatfield to have been a justifiable homicide. The pardon is now urged upon 
the ground of the prisoner's failing health. 

The prison physician says: 

"In compliance with orders, I have made a critical examination as to the phys- 
ical condition of Jas. Foster, a convict in the Northern penitentiary. He has had 
two attacks of pneumonia within the last year, which has left him in a feeble con- 
dition. His pulse is one hundred and ten, respiration twenty, showing a condition 
of the heart and circulating system from which it is hard for him to recover while 
remaining in the penitentiary." \ 

The warden reports his conduct good. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

38. Willakd Morris, who was convicted in the Clinton Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 27th day of January, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned April 5, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The petition- 
ers, citizens of Clinton county, including the owners of the property, the prosecu- 
ting witness, defendant's counsel, eleven jurors, the attorneys who represented the 
State, a late Jiepresentative and the present Senator, and a majority of the county 
officers and their deputies, represent to me that the defendant is a young man of 
but nineteen years; that on the night of January 11, 1877, he was, by a night 
wat^hrnan in the city of Frankfort, discovered while rolling a barrel of coal-oil 
along the sidewalk on Main street, it having been removed from the drug store of 
Bryant &Norris; and that he was intoxicated at the time. The prosecutor and 
the mayor of the city, who assisted him, have written me quite fully, and both 
earnestly recommend a pardon. Those familiar with the facts are now of opinion 



71 

that the freak of the defendant lacked a felonous intent to deprive the owners of 
their property, and that he was guilty of a trespass, only. He has served more 
than one year, and has been sufficiently punished for his mischievous act to induce 
him to lead a better life when he returns to the society of his fellow-men. The 
deputy warden (in the absence of the warden,) reports his conduct good. The 
judgment includes a fine of fifteen dollars, which is not affected by this decision. 
The pardon is granted. | • . 

J. D. W. 

39. "William Baine, who was convicted in the Bartholomew Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 11th day of January, 1877, to 
be imprisoned for the term of two and one-half years. Pardoned April 11, 1878, 
and released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Gov- 
ernor. The defendant has served one-half his term. This application for his 
pardon was received May 22, 1877. The petition shows that the defendant was 
convicted upon his plea of guilty, and urges a pardon for the reason that he has 
from childhood been of weak mind. The recitals of the petition are supported by 
the affidavits of persons acquainted with the prisoner. The judge who imposed the 
sentence writes me that he has read the medical affidavits, and, taking them as true, 
has no doubt that Baine should be pardoned. Upon a reference of the case to the 
prison officers, in February last, the warden replied : 

"Convict William Baine is a simple-minded, harmless fellow, scarcely capable 
to [have] committed a larceny. His conduct has been good." 

The physician reported: 

"At your request I have examined "William Baine, and pronounce him non 
compos mentis, or, in other words, a feeble-minded person, who, in my judgment, 
would be easily influenced by others." 

I have deferred action upon the case until to-day. The warden, in answer to 
my inquiry, reports the prisoner's conduct yet good. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

40. James Imes, who. was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court of 
the crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 5th day of September, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of one year. Pardoned May 1, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The petition 
is signed by the clerk, auditor and sheriff, the judge and prosecuting attorney, and 
other citizens of Marion county. They say that the defendant was jointly indicted 
with one Philip Corridan for the larceny of an accordeon, and they believe him a 
fit subject for executive clemency because of his youth, his previous reputation for 
honesty, sobriety, morality and industry, and because recent developments tend to 
cast a doubt upon the question of his guilt as charged in the indictment. They 
further say that, in December, the co-defendant was, upon his plea of guilty, and 
because of his youth, permitted to depart upon his promise of good behavior. The 
petition is supported by affidavits tending to show the prisoner's innocence and 
his previous good character. The warden reports his conduct good. The pardon 
is granted. J. D. W. 

41. William Cahill, who was convicted in the St. Joseph Circuit Court of 
the crime of burglary, and sentenced, on the 16th day of March, 1877, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned May 7, 1878, and released from con- 



72 

finement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner 
has served more than one-half his term, arid is well reported by the warden. He 
was jointly indicted with John Kelley for breaking and entering into the butcher- 
shop of John I). Calkins, and was convicted upon a plea of guilty. His pardon is 
asked by prominent and respectable citizens of St. Joseph county, including the 
judge ot the court and most of the county officers. They base their appeal upon 
these grounds : 

That during his incarceration in the county jail, awaiting the time of his trial 
on said indictment, there was [were] two different jail deliveries, and all that were 
confined in the jail at the time (six), made their escape, with the exception of 
Cahill, who each time recused to go, or have anything whatever to do with said 
jail deliveries. And gave as a reason: that he had done nothing but what he was 
willing to be punished for, and would not shirk any responsibility. That since 
his confinement in the State prison, the reports from said institution show him to 
be behaving well. The offence was committed while under the influence of liquor 
and Cahill was only an accomplice, not principal. His parents are both quite aged, 
and need his assistance very much, and they are satisfied that their boy's promises 
of reformation will be faithfully carried out." 

The punishment seems adequate to the offence. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

42. William H. McBkyant, who was convicted in the Jay Circuit Court of 
the crime of forgery, and sentenced, on the 27th day of October, 1876, to be im- 
prisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned May 9, 1878, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison North. Decision,: By the Governor. The prisoner has 
served more than eighteen months of his term, and the warden reports that his 
conduct has been good. The petition for his pardon was received April 18, 1877> 
and is signed by the judge and prosecuting attorney, the clerk, sheriff, auditor and 
treasurer of Jay county, the prosecuting witness and other citizens. They make 
this statement of the circumstances of the forgery: 

" He was a young man, about twenty-three years of age, poor, and had just 
recently married an estimable young lady. Not having the means to buy furni- 
ture to begin house-keeping, he sought to buy furniture of a furniture dealer 
named William T. Allen, at Camden, in this county, and was informed that if he 
would procure one James B. Nickerson to sign the note — which only amounted 
to $26 50, on three months time — that he could get the furniture. He had the note 
filled up, took it away, and, failing to procure the signature he afterwards placed 
the name of Nickerson on the note, and returning, got the amount of the note 
in furniture. He, at the time, had earned and expected to get the money to pay 
it when due, but the men who owed him, disappointed him and, consequently, 
when it became due he was unable to lift it, and it was presented to Nickerson for 
payment, when the fact of the forgery became known. He has since, as we are 
informed and believe, caused said note to be paid. We do not believe that he 
really intended to defraud any one; but that he fully believed he could pay 
said note when due; but in consequence of the hard times was unable to do so. 
We do not believe that he intended to commit a crime, although he was, under the 
circumstances, technically guilty of forgery, which he frankly acknowledged and 
plead guilty. He was a man of good character, and this his first offense." 

The judge makes this recommendation: 



73 

" I heartily endorse the statements of the within petition. The crime for which 
the within named McBryant is now suffering the penally, was committed through 
the pressure of his necessities, without the intention of depriving any person of his 
property, and no one did suffer thereby. I therefore believe that he has been suf- 
ficiently punished and is a fit subject for executive clemency." 

The prosecuting attorney forwarded the petition, and in his letter says the pros- 
ecuting witness heartily desires the prisoner's release, and he hopes that I will 
extend the executive clemency to him at once. 

The circumstances of the case and the recommendations made, will now justify 
the prisoner's release. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

43. Abe Leti, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court of 
the crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 10th day of August, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of one year. Pardoned May 11, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The clerk, 
auditor, sheriff and treasurer of Marion county have signed a petition for defend- 
ant's pardon. They express the belief that this is the first time that he has ever 
aeen convicted of a crime, and that the punishment already suffered has been suf- 
ficient to deter him from a life of evil and induce him to become an honest and 
industrious citizen. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

44. George M. Grimes, who was convicted in the Wayne Circuit Court of 
the crime of forgery, and sentenced, on the 12th day of May, 1877, to be imprisoned 
for the term of two years. Pardoned May 13, 1878, and released from confinement 
in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The petition was received 
July 21. 1877. It is signed by seven of the jury, the party defrauded, the prose- 
cuting attorney, several county officers, the mayor and marshal of the city of 
Eichmond and twenty-seven attorneys of Wayne county. They say "that said 
Grimes is an old man, sixty years of age, and infirm in both body and mind, hav- 
ing a wife and large family of children depending upon him for support. Believ- 
ing that this old man is a subject for executive clemency, we, therefore, most 
respectfully ask that he be pardoned and at once set free, believing that the good of 
society or the demands of law no longer require his confinement; and we further 
represent that the said Grimes has already been confined in the county jail and 
State's prison since the 20th day of February, 1877." 

The judge who presided at the trial, writes: 

"He is a poor old man, whose life and energies are nearly exhausted as the 
result of dissipation. The evidence showed him to have been once a man cf 
property and trustworthiness. Great sympathy prevailed on the trial in his behalf. 
His actions were very much like those of a person whose mind was rapidly decay- 
ing. I am of the opinion that his release from imprisonment would rather pro- 
mote than impair the cause of justice and of right." 

The warden reports that his conduct has been excellent. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

45. William Shannon, who was convicted in the Jefferson Circuit Court of 
the crime of petit laceny, and sentenced, on the 15th day of December, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of six months and disfranchised for ten years. Pardoned 
May 23, 1878, and released from confinement in the jail of Jefferson county. 



74 

46. William Kirchner, who was convicted in the Jefferson Circuit Court of 
the crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 15th day of Decemher, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of six months and disfranchised for ten years. Pardoned 
May 23, 1878, and released from confinement in the jail of Jefferson county. Deci- 
sion: By the Governor. The petition shows that the delendants, Shannon and Wil- 
liam Kirchner, were arraigned upon a joint indictment, and upon conviction each 
was sentenced to the county jail for six months and disfranchised for ten years and 
lined, Shannon in the sum of fifty dollars and Kirchner one dollar, and that Shan- 
non has been in jail since August 19, 1877, and Kirchner not quite so long. The 
petitioners are respectable citizens of Jefferson county, and are of opinion that a 
pardon of each would be productive of good. The county officers are of the 
opinion that it would be proper for me "to grant a general remission and pardon 
of the fines, imprisonment and disfranchisement against William Shannon and 
William Kirchner," etc. 

In response to a letter of inquiry, the judge says: 

"First, in relation to the fine of fifty dollars. I tried the case of William 
Kirchner, who was jointly indicted with Shannon on the same evidence, and I only 
fined him one dollar, which I thought was sufficient, and I think the fine ought to 
be remitted. As to the disfranchisement, I am unable to give you any reason why 
so long a term was fixed. There was nothing in the evidence, or apparent at the 
trial, that called for so unusual a time to be fixed, and I know of none." 

The prosecuting attorney recommends a pardon to each. The term of imprison- 
ment has almost expired. The prisoners are well reported by the jailor. .The 
residue of the punishment is clearly excessive. The pardon of each is granted, 
and Shannon's fine will be remitted. J. D. W. 

47. Henry W. Edens, who was convicted in the Boone Circuit Court of the 
crime of rape, and sentenced, on the 24th day of May, 1876, to be imprisoned for 
the term of three years. Pardoned May 24, 1878, and released from confinement 
in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The petition is signed by 
the prosecuting attorney, the ex-clerk of the court, the present clerk, the sheriff, 
auditor, treasurer, and one commissioner of the county, and other persons, includ- 
ing the mother of the prosecuting witness. It recites: 

" That the evidence upon the trial of said cause was chiefly the testimony of the 
said Indiana Prewitt; that since the trial of said cause, and the conviction of said 
Henry W. Edens, the said Indiana Prewitt has made her voluntary affidavit exon- 
erating the said Henry W. Edens in all of said charges against him, which is pre- 
sented herewith." 

The substance of the affidavit is as follows : 

"Indiana Jane Prewitt, being first duly sworn, upon her oath says that she was 
the prosecuting witness in the case of the State of Indiana against Henry W. 
Edens, now in the penitentiary in the State of Indiana on a charge of committing 
a rape, or attempting to commit a rape, upon the person of this affiant, then a 
female child under the age of twelve years; that she is the person upon whose body 
the attempt was alleged to have been committed. She further says that he, said 
Edrm, had not attempted to commit the act upon her person with which he was 
charged in that prosecution, in the Boone Circuit Court; that this affiant did not 
testify to the matters to which she did testify in said trial, upon her own will, but 
that she was told before the trial just what she must testify to; and she further 



75 

states upon her oath, that she was told, under threats of hodily harm, that she must 
testify to what she did; and further, that she would not have so testified if she had 
not feared for her safety; and further, that all the testimony that said Henry W. 
Edens made any unlawful attempt, or any attempt, to carnally know her. is utterly 
false, and was at the time of the trial of ?aid cause, and that she voluntarily makes 
this affidavit without any threats or promises of reward; that she is now past 
thirteen years of age." 

The deputy prosecuting attorney and his principal, have written a letter in sup- 
port of the statements made in the petition and affidavit. The warden has reported 
that the prisoner's c mduct has been good. From all the facts presented I conclude 
that the defendant should not be longer held under the judgment. The pardon is 
granted. J- D. W. 

48. Edward C. Husted, who was convicted in the Wayne Circuit Court of 
the crime of rape, and sentenced, on the 29th day of March, 1878, to be imprisoned 
for the term of one year. Pardoned May 25, 1878, and released from confinement 
in the jail of Wayne county. Decision: By the Governor. This application is 
supported by the recommendations of nine jurors and prominent citizens of 
Eiehmond, Muncie and Terre Haute, where the defendant formerly lived. I have 
carefully read the evidence as reported, and have conversed with persons tamiliar 
with the circumstances of the trial and conviction. The defendant, and another 
young man, late at night, accompanied two girls to an unoccupied house in Eich- 
mond, where they drank wine and were familiar with each other. Each young 
man was subsequently indicted for rape upon the body of one of the girls. This 
defendant was first tried and convicted, great excitement prevailing in the commu- 
nity at the time, and the facts being unfairly presented in the public prints. The 
other defendant v/as afterward acquitted. I am not satisfied that the prisoner com- 
mitted the crime for which he is is held, although, hy his own admission he is shown 
tohavebeen guilty of great freedom with the person of the prosecuting witness. The 
act complained of was evidently committed with her consent, and the charge of 
violence and force was an afterthought. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

49. Isrel Harding, who was convicted in the Decatur Circuit Court of the 
crime of forgery, and sentenced on the 2d day of March, 1877, to be imprisoned 
for the term of two years. Pardoned May 31, 1878, and released from confine- 
ment, in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The petition is signed 
by officers and citizens of Decatur county and the judge and prosecuting attorney 
of the court, and recites: " That the note alleged to be forged was paid ofi° in full 
by the said Israel Harding before the prosecution was begun, and no one was 
injured or defrauded by the alleged forgery ; that the defendant had maintained a 
good character for honesty before the indictment in this case was preferred against 
him." The prisoner has now served about fifteen months, and is very well reported 
by the warden. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

50. Christian Schafeer, who was convicted in the Vigo Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 31st day of May, 1877? 
to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned May 31, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The 
petition is made by citizens of Vigo county, who say that until his arrest the 
defendant had sustained a good character for honesty, integrity and industry, and 



76 

that he was convicted at a time when excitement ran high in relation to the par- 
ticular class of crime with which he stood charged, and that the evidence against 
him is not of a character to convince that community of his guilt beyond a reason- 
able doubt. William E. Hendrich, a member of the bar of Vigo county, presided 
as judge at the trial, and has written me a letter, in which he says: 

"The case was tried by a jury. The evidence in the case upon which the 
defendant was convicted was the evidence of one James P. White, an amateur 
detective, a person who had re-ided here but a few years, who, under the guise of 
confederating with the defendant, induced and proposed to him to commit the 
crime and share in the profits. For some time previous a number of thefts had 
been committed in this community in stealing cattle, and a number of victims 
combined to discover and prosecute the perpetrators, and selected this witness, for 
a compensation, to detect the guilty parties, and he, suspecting the defendant, made 
the above proposition. Schaffer had lived in this city for a number of years, and 
borne the reputation of a sober and industrious man, devotedly attached to his 
family, as was shown by twenty-five witnesses on the trial, who knew him well. 
Schaffer is about thirty years old, has a family of three children, the eldest not 
over five years old. At the time of conviction he was a poor man, and left nothing 
upon which his family could subsist; his wife, an excellent woman, has ever since, 
by washing and other menial work, supported her children. On the trial of the 
cause I became convinced that Schaffer was guilty of the crime, but from the evi- 
dence of his previous good character I then, and do now, doubt whether he would 
have committed the crime except upon the inducement of the above-named detec- 
tive. But, in the face of a good jury that convicted him, I could not take the 
responsiblity of setting aside the verdict and give him a new trial. He has now 
served eleven montns in the penitentiary, and the lesson he has received, 1 have 
no doubt, will serve him as a warning for life. The family of Schaffer is in a most 
deplorable condition, and feel that it is nothing but humane to give back the hus- 
band and father. I join with the petitioners to your Excellency to pardon hinv' 

Hon. D. W. Voorhees says: 

" I assisted in the prosecution and am familiar with the case. I believe he 
ought to be pardoned — that he has been sufficiently punished for his offense." 

The county officers recommend that at the expiration of one year from the 
time of conviction a pardon be granted. The warden reports that the prisoner's 
conduct has been very good. One year of the term has now been served. The 
pardon is granted. 

51. Hattitc Smith, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court of 
the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 6th day of December, 1877, to 
be imprisoned for the term of three years. Pardoned June 5, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the Female Prison. Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner 
was indicted as Hattie Swallow. Since the finding of the indictment, and before 
conviction, she was married to Jackson Smith, a man of reputed good character, 
who believed her innocent of the crime charged. The petition is signed by the 
judge, prosecuting attorney and clerk of the court, by all the jurors, by the prose- 
cuting witness, and by other officers and citizens of Marion county, and states that 
the defendant was less than eighteen j'ears of age, and that since her imprisonment 
she is suffering from sickness. The superintendent and assistant superintendent 



77 

certify that she has conducted herself with propriety during her stay in the insti- 
tution. The prison physician says: 

" I believe that a pardon would be advisable in this case." 

The pardon is granted. J. D. "W. 

52. Leonard J. Schwonenberger, who was convicted in the Marion Crim- 
inal Circuit Court of the crime of incest, and sentenced, on the 19th day of October, 
1876, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned June 5, 1878, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. 
The petition is signed by the judge and clerk of the court and other re-pectable 
citizens of Marion county. They say the prisoner has a wife who is now, and has 
been for some time past in feeble health, and one child, five years of age, which is 
utterly helpless, having been unable to walk, stand or sit alone at any time during 
its life; that they are in destitute circumstances, and need the care of the husband 
and father. I have seen the child, and am satisfied that the statements of the peti- 
tioners are true, and constitute good cau-e for a pardon. The prisoner has served 
more than half his term, and is well reported by the warden. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

53. Peter Meyers, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of burglary, and sentenced, on the 18th day of September, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of one year. Pard ned June 6, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The petition 
is signed by the judge, assistant prosecuting attorney, and clerk of the court, the 
sheriff, treasurer and auditor of Marion county and other citizens, and contains the 
following: 

"Your petitioners would also further represent that said Peter i& still a minor, 
being: but eighteen years of age at this time, and was, up to the time of his said 
conviction, the chief aid and support of his parents, who are advanced in years; 
and that, previous to his alleged participation in the offense for which he now 
sutlers punishment, he had always been an exemplary young man of steady, indus- 
trious habits, and of good, law-abiding character in all respects; and, also, we are 
satisfied that his participation in said offense was purely the result of the persuasion 
of others who are much older in years, as well as more experienced in evil ways, 
and that the punishment he has already undergone and suffered is quite sufficient 
to work the reformation contemplated by our laws, and that to extend to him 
now executive clemency would have a great tendency to change his habits which 
he so recently fell into, and make a better citizen and young man of him." 

He has now served more than one-half his term. The warden reports his con- 
duct good. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

54. Adam Hagel, who was convicted in the Floyd Circuit Court of the crime 
of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 14th day of February, 1878, to be impris- 
oned for the term of six months. Pardoned June 14. 1878, and released from con- 
finement in the jail of Floyd county. Decision: By the Governor. The petition 
was made by officers of Floyd county and the city of New Albany, in April last. 
They say : 

"Hagel, who is a minor, was employed as bar-tender for Frank Nadorfe, who 
joins in this petition. He took $40 dollars from said Nardorfe's establishment, was 



78 

arrested on charge of larceny and confined in the county jail three months, until 
the session of the Floyd Circuit Court, when he was arraigned and plead guilty to 
the charge. The court sentenced him to the county jail for six months. He has 
now served two months of his term of imprisonment. In consequence of his youth, 
and the fact that he has been imprisoned five months, and it being his first offense, 
and he being the whole support of his mother, a respectable lady, we believe his 
punishment has been sufficient for the purpose of the law, and that it is a use- 
less expense to our county to keep him in confinement any longer. We think his 
■case one that calls for executive clemency." 

I delayed a decision to await a recommendation of the Judge. He wrote me 
April 23 : 

' : It being the judgment of the city and county officials that the purpose of the 
sentence of Adam Hagel has been subserved, and his case not being an aggravated 
•one, I deem it not inconsistent with my duties to the public to join in the petition 
for his pardon." 

Four months of the term have now expired. The prisoner has been in jail, as I 
understand, more than six months. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

55. Samuel Morgan, who was convicted in the Miami Circuit Court of the 
crime of assault and battery, and sentenced, on the 17th day of April, 1878, to be 
imprisoned for the term of ninety days. Pardoned June 20, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the jail of Miami county. Decision: By the Governor. The 
petition states that the defendant is a young man who had borne a good reputation 
in the community, and had not before been accused of crime; that the assault and 
battery was not of an aggravated character, was committed while in a state of in- 
toxication, and was provoked by the person upon whom the battery was committed; 
that Morgan is in very bad health ; that the county jail is in such a comdition that 
it is almost impossible for any person, even in an ordinary state of health, to sur- 
vive imprisonment in it for so long a time as the defendant must remain, and that 
he has no money with which to pay the fine. 

The judge t» rites: 

"Morgan plead guilty. The substantial facts are these: Morgan attacked, at 
the depot, in Peru, an entire stranger, a passenger, just starting for the death-bed 
of his mother. Morgan was terribly drunk. Having biutally chastised him once, 
after having done it once, he pursued him and did it a second time. It was proba- 
bly a drunken mistake. But the act had no excuse, was wanton, brutal and cruel. 
On the hearing, it was shown, that excepting this one -fact, his conduct had been 
good, and his habits steady and industrious. I am satisfied there was nothing ex- 
■ces=ive or improper in the penalty adjudged. But on the facts mentioned by Mr. 
Effinger, I heartily recommend his pardon. Tbe jail is awful, but, as reported by 
the grand jury, kept in as good condition as such a jail can be. But believing that 
the punishment was proper, yet, if it can not be executed without danger to Mor- 
gan's health or life, I think his entire forgiveness is much better than an act of pub- 
lic cruelty. I am sure in heaven's chancery, nobody will ever be blamed for having 
been on the side of mercy." 

The prosecuting attorney and some of the county officers heartilv join in the 
judge's recommendation of pardon. The accompanying letter of Mr. Effinger 
referred to, contains a particular statement of the prisoner's condition, and asks the 



79 

recommendation of the judge "for the reason of the fast-failing health of the 
prisoner, the filthy and miserable prison in which he is confined, and the danger 
that a confinement of one hundred and eighty days might prove fatal." The clerk, 
sheriff, auditor and treasurer, are of the opinion that it would be proper for me to 
remit the fine for the following reasons: 

"1st. The said Samuel Morgan is a poor laboring man, wholly unable to pay 
said fine or secure the same. 2d. His continued confinement for the non-payment 
of his fine would be an act of public cruelty, on account of the unavoidable condi- 
tion of our county jail, (the jail being in the rear cellar of the court-house,) and 
the injury that might result to the health or life of the prisoner. 3d. He has 
already served fifty-seven days in the county jail, and his further imprisonment 
only burdens the county with costs without subserving public justice." 

Upon these recommendations, I deem it proper that the prisoner be released. 
The pardon is granted and the fine will be remitted. J. D. W. 

56. William W. Snyder, who was convicted in the Greene Circuit Court of 
the crime of forgery, and sentenced on the 14th day of June, 1877, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned June 28, 1878, and released from con- 
finment in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The petition is 
made by citizens of Greene county. They say that the defendant had at the time 
of his trial just attained his majority, and before the commission of the crime 
charged had always sustained a good character; that the crime charged was for an 
insignificant amount, and the same has been fully repaid by the defendant; that it 
is believed by his acquaintances that he has been sufficiently punished for the 
crime committed, and that he has fully reformed, and if pardoned will lead an 
honest life, and they recommend that he be pardoned. The ceunty commissioners 
and officers add a like recommendation. The judge has written me fully of the 
facts of the conviction, and says: 

"The boy seemed to me to be sincerely repentant, and as I said above, very 
favorably impressed me. If he has borne himself well since his imprisonment 
and given further evideaces of an intention to lead an honest life, I would not 
hesitate to recommend his pardon even now, and would feel like requesting it at 
the expiration of a year from the time of his sentence. 1 have talked with several 
leading citizens here in regard to the boy, and they all concur in speaking well of 
him and in expressing astonishment at his having committed the offenses referred 
to. I am satisfied that the petition for pardon expresses the real wish of at least a 
very considerable number of worthy and prominent citizens, who join in it, and 
have not signed merely to get rid of importunity." 

More than one year has now been' served, and the prisoner has behaved well. 
The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

57. Charles Ready, who was convicted in the Vigo Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 8th day of June, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned June 28, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. Citizens of 
Yigo county ask the prisoner's pardon, and say: 

"Upon the representation that he would receive a light sentence he was induced 
to enter a plea of guilty, he still maintaining his innocence, but having no means 
with which to defend himself. He is a young man, only twenty years of age, and 
had always borne a good reputation prior to this charge. He was the only support 



80 

of a widowed mother, who has, since the time of his conviction, heen a charge of 
the county. When Ready was convicted of this offense the excitement in regard 
to this particular class of crime ran high. If guilty at all, he was unwittingly led 
into the commission of the crime by others older in years, and has already suffi- 
ciently atoned for the offense. Ready is an industrious boy, and before his confine- 
ment in the State Prison, through his exertions, earned a good support for himself 
and his widowed mother." 

The judge and prosecuting attorney have written me as follows: 

"As judge and prosecuting attorney of the Vigo Criminal Circuit Court, we 
respectfully request your Excellency to grant a pardon to Charles Ready, sentenced 
to the State Prison in said court on June 8, 1877, for two years on a plea of guilty 
of grand larceny. Young Ready was in the employ of the Schaffer brothers, who, 
with others, were arrested and convicted of cattle stealing about that time. We 
discovered at the time that by reason of said employment Christian Schaffer had 
great influence over Ready, and doubtless induced him to commit the offense, or 
rather assist in it, for Schaffer was the instigator of it. In view of these facts we 
would have sent Ready only one year had there been any law by which this could 
have been done. As it was, we promised him and his mother at the time that all 
our influence should be directed to secure his pardon at the end of one year. The 
time is already passed, and Christian Schaffer has been pardoned and has returned. 
Your Excellency will therefore see the justice of having our promise fulfilled and 
the propriety of granting the pardon under all the circumstances." 

The warden reports that the conduct of the prisoner ha* been good. The par- 
don is granted. J. D. W. 

58. Reynolds Oltn, who was convicted in the Warrick Circuit Court of the 
crime of assault and battery with intent to kill, and sentenced, on the 20th day of 
April, 1877, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned July 1, 1878, 
and released from confinement in the the State Prison South. Decision : By the 
Governor. The petitions for the defendant's pardon are signed by nine jurors, the 
auditor, sheriff and recorder of Warrick county, and other citizens, and were 
received November 28, 1877. They state that the prisoner was fifty-five years of 
age when sentenced ; that he has been nearly blind from his infancy; that because 
of illness and disease, he had become cross and irritable, and that the said assault 
and battery with intent to kill, was committed upon a sudden heat of passion and 
in an unguarded moment; that in his case, reformation has been accomplished, and 
that he should be pardoned. In reply to my request for his opinion, the judge 
writes: 

"After due deliberation on the matter, I have come to the conclusion, from the 
facts and circumstances of the, case, to recommend his pardon." 

The warden reports : 

"The within named convict, Reynolds Olin, is an old and almost sightless man. 
His conduct as a prisoner has been excellent." 

The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

59. William C. Bridges, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crimes of robbery and assault and battery with intent to kill and mur- 
der, and sentenced, on the 5th day of June, 1867, to be imprisoned for the term of 



81 

fourteen years. Pardoned July 3, 1878, and released from confinement in the State 
Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner has now served more 
than eleven years of his terms of sentence. The warden reports that "his conduct 
for the last six and a half years has heen good, but prior to that was very bad." 

In August last, the prison physician reported as follows : 

"William Bridges, an inmate of the Indiana State Prison North, has been 
examined by me and been under treatment since my appointment to office. He 
has a very bad prolapsus of the bowels, the rectum extending six to eight inches 
beyond the anus whenever he strains hard. For months he has been unable to 
have a passage without the use of an injection by the rectum There is a constant 
inflammation of the catarrhal form in the lower bowel, causing him to pass blood 
and water, which inflammation from slight provocation extends to the intestines 
above. He suffers from indigestion all the time, and his bowels and liver are tor- 
pid. This, which is his greatest trouble, impairs general nutrition, leaving him in 
a weakened debilitated condition and liable to contract other diseases and little 
able to withstand them. He suffers also from neuralgia of the left side and fre- 
quent palpitations of the heart, caused doubtless, by his enfeebled health, there 
being no organic disease of the heart or lungs at present. He has frequent attacks 
of bronchitis, which is now chronic and is quite anaemic, that is, his blood is im- 
poverished by the loss of red corpuscles." 

Hon. George Chapman writes : 

"About the 5th day of June, 1867, one William Bridges, alias ' Hoosier Bill,' was 
tried before me, as judge of the Criminal Court of Marion county, on a charge of 
robbery, and sentenced to fourteen years' imprisonment. At same time he plead 
guilty to a charge of assault and battery with intent to kill — both offences growing 
out of the same transaction — and a like sentence was imposed to run parallel with 
the sentence in the robbery case. A letter is now shown me, dated August 2, 1877 
from the then physician of the prison, in regard to said Bridges' health. I am also 
informed his conduct has been such during a number of years past that, under the 
rules of the prison, so much of a diminution of sentence has been worked that he 
has now but a year to serve, or less. If this information is correct, and if his 
health is now similar to what it was when the letter referred to was written I 
have no hesitation in recommending the interposition of executive clemency to 
relieve him from the residue of his term of service." ' 

The present judge and prosecuting attorney of the court join in the recom- 
mendation because of the prisoner's reported bad health. Two of the county 
commissioners, the present sheriff, treasurer and auditor, of Marion county, the 
gentleman who was sheriff in 1867, and the present and a former chief of police of 
Indianapolis, request a pardon. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W, 

60. William J. Abrams, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of murder, and sentenced, on the 18th day of September, 1869, 
to be imprisoned for the term of his natural life. Pardoned July 3, 1878, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. 
The papers before me in support of this application were received June 26, 1875. 
A certified transcript contains the following : 

6 Pardons. 



82 

"We, the jury, find the defendant, William J. Abrams, guilty of murder in the 
first degree, as charged in the indictment, and that he be confined in the State's 
prison for life. James H. Turner, Foreman. 

"Accompanying said verdict is the following recommendation, to-wit: 

" We, the undersigned, jurymen in the case of the State vs. William J. Abrams, 
having in the discharge of our duty, and under the solemnity of our oaths, found 
the defendant guilty of murder in the first degree, yet believing that the crime 
committed by him was the result of wicked influences surrounding him, and not 
the result of a bad heart, we would respectfully ask the Governor to commute his 
sentence to ten years' imprisonment. 

James H. Turner, Foreman. 

Elihu Copeland. 

John Horton. 

William Jennings. 

A. C. Carr. 

Jacob Horner. 

George W. Huston. 

James Davis. 

J. S. Brown. 

Thomas M. Harbin. 

William Mills. 

Franklin Hall." 

Eight jurors have signed a petition 'for the defendant's pardon. Citizens of 
Marion county, by petitions, ask that he may be pardoned and set at liberty. A 
full and particular statement of the facts of the case is made by counsel engaged in 
the trial. On the 13th day of September, 1868, the dead bodies of Jacob Young 
and Nancy Jane Young, his wife, were found at Cold Spring, on the bank of 
White river, near the city of Indianapolis. Suspicion fell upon Mrs. Nancy E. 
Clem, her brother, Silas A. Hartman and the defendant. Mrs. Clem has been 
discharged after several trials. Hartman committed suicide while in confinement 
in the jail of Marion county awaiting his trial. On Tuesday evesiing, September 
15, 1868, Abrams was arrested upon a justice's warrant, and, without a preliminary 
examination, was committed to jail to await the action of the grand jury. The 
trial commenced August 31, 1869, and resulted as heretofore stated. The argu- 
ment concludes as follows: 

"We believe we are safe in the assertion that were Abrams to be tried now upon 
the very same testimony produced against him on the trial, any jury would, with- 
out hesitation, acquit him. We desire to call your special consideration to the fact 
that the jury was out nearly three days deliberating upon their verdict, and when 
they finally returned it, it was accompanied by a recommendation to executive 
clemency, after imprisonment of ten years. If Abrams was really guilty of the 
atrocious crime charged against him, the punishment provided by law would be 
just. Why, then, if the jury believed him guity, did they recommend him to 
mercy? This, in our minds, is conclusive that the jurors were not convinced 
beyond reasonable doubt of his guilt. While they were perhaps unconsciously 
influenced by the prevalent public sentiment, and convicted him, they were desir- 
ous of relieving themselves from a burden by the recommendation to mercy. We 
therefore ask your Excellency to give the pending application speedy consideration 
and to relieve William J. Abrams from further imprisonment, believing that 
thereby the cause of justice will be subserved." 



83 

My predecessor, before retiring from office, made the following indorsement of 
opinion: 

"I have examined this case with much care, and have decided that if no further 
light be thrown upon the transaction with which he is connected, the prisoner 
should be pardoned at the end of this year of his term. I am not satisfied that his 
guilt was sufficiently established. He has been failing in bodily and mental strength. 

January 8, 1877. T. A. H." 

I have examined the case several times, and at the last examination fixed upon 
this as the proper time to grant the prayer of the petitioners. The warden reports 
that the prisoner's conduct has been unexceptionably good during his confinement 
in prison. The pardon is granted. J. J). "W. 

61. Thomas Allen, who was convicted in the Tippecanoe Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 1st day of June, 1877, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned July 12th, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The petition 
is signed by the judge, prosecuting attorney and clerk of the court, the sheriff, 
auditor and treasurer of Tippecanoe county, and the city marshal of Lafayette. 
They say " that the offense was committed about 10 o'clock a. m., in a public place 
when he was under the influence of liquor, and we believe him to have been misled 
by one Barney Kouark, a bad associate of a maturer age; that the larceny of which 
he was convicted consisted in taking a suit of clothes that had been left with one 
Mary Kreister to be cleaned and renovated, and from whom they were stolen 
while hanging on a clothes line near an alley that was not enclosed, and which was 
but half a square from the public square in the city of Lafayette, and that the 
clothes were valued at eighteen dollars; that, so far as our knowledge goes, this 
was his first offense, and we heartily and earnestly recommend him to executive 
clemency." 

The prosecuting attorney who procured the conviction has made a full statement 
of the facts of the case, concluding as follows: 

" Allen was sentenced, on his plea of guilty to said charge, to three years in the 
State's prison, which, upon the introduction of extenuating matters, was commuted 
to two years. And I further say that, considering the circumstances surrounding- 
said case, the time, condition of said Allen and his relation to said act, I believe 
the punishment already suffered by him is commensurate with his said crime, and 
that it is a case calling for your executive clemency." 

More than thirteen months of the term have expired, and the warden reports 
the prisoner's conduct unexceptionably good. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

62. John Kelley, who was convicted in the St. Joseph Circuit Court of the 
crime of burglary, and sentenced, on the 2d day of January, 1877, to be imprisoned 
for the term of three years. Pardoned July 18, 1878, and released from confine- 
ment in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. The petition for the 
defendant's pardon is signed by the officers of St. Joseph county, by twenty-two 
attorneys, including the late judge of the court, and by prominent business men 
and resident citizens of South Bend. They assign as reasons that this was the first 
offense; that he has been sufficiently punished, and that he was but a boy when con- 
victed. Eight jurors express the opinion "that his punishment has been quite suf- 



84 

ficient for his reformation, connected with the fact that this was his first offense,'' 
and they therefore earnestly recommend his pardon. The person whose house was 
entered has joined in the recommendation of pardon. One-half the term has now 
been served. The warden reports that his conduct has been good. The pardon is 
granted. J. D. W. 

63. Charles Lang, who was convicted in the Vigo Criminal Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 21st day of May, 1877, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned July 23, 1878, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. The petition of 
citizens of Vigo count}' states that the prisoner leaves "a wifaandtwo small children, 
one aged one year and the other aged three years, in most destitute circumstances, 
being dependent upon the mother for support, she being at present in delicate health 
(with child) and unable to help them, even if times were more prosperous than 
they now are, and if the father was here te help them, it would not only be a kind 
and righteous act in you, but would be the means of saving the county a great ex- 
pense; that said Chas. Lang was sent to prison wrongfully, will be proved by the 
proper papers and signed by the proper parties." A copy of this indictment shows 
that the defendant was charged with stealing "one cow of the value of twenty-five • 
dollars, of the personal property of Mar_v Ann Greggs." Two jurors, the coroner, 
auditor, treasurer, clerk of the court, and other citizens, ask a pardon. 

In reply to my request, the judge says : 

" I can not consistently give a favorable opinion." 

The prosecuting attorney says : 

" I deem it very proper and just to pardon Charles Lang and also Charles Reedy 
as I think they have undergone sufficient punishment for the crimes for which they 
have been imprisoned. I would, therefore, respectfully recommend their pardon." 

Hon. D. W. Voorhees writes: 

" I am assured by reliable parties that the pardon of Chas. Lang, now confined 
in the Southern Penitentiary, would be an act of justice as well as mercy. From 
my knowledge of the case, also, I cordially join in a recommendation to that effect." 

The warden reports that the prisoner has sustained good conduct and seems to 
be a good man. More than fourteen months have been served. The pardon is- 
granted. J. D. W. 

61. John Percifield, who was convicted, in the Bartholomew Circuit Court, 
of the crime of forgery, and sentenced, on the 27th day of April, 1877, to be im- 
prisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned July 23, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The petition 
is signed by the judge, several county officers and one hundred and seventy five 
citizens of Bartholomew county, and contains the following: "The offense for 
which he was sent was for forging several small orders on a farmer and passing 
them at a store. The names of the farmer and merchant will appear on this peti- 
tion. He is very poor, and had to work by day's work to support a wife and three 
small children, who are now entirely destitute of anything to subsist on, and are 
supported by the neighbors. He has always been a temperate and industrious 
man, and this is his first offense. We believe, if you will pardon him, he will go 
to work and support his family." 



85 

William J. Marsh writes : "His family live in sight of me; they are in a suf- 
fering condition, I have known Pearsifield all his life, and never knew anything 
wrong of him except the one act. He has worked for me half the time for the 
last four years." 

The warden reports : " The within-named John Percifleld has heen a good 
prisoner, uniformly quiet and orderly in his demeanor." 

He has served nearly fifteen months. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

65. James Gooi>, who was convicted, in the Posey Circuit Court, of the crime 
of assault and hattery with intent to rape, and sentenced, on the 17th day of Jan- 
uary, 1877, to he imprisoned for the term of four years. Pardoned July 23, 1878, 
and released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Gover- 
nor. The petition is signed by officers and attorneys of Posey county, and recites 
the facts of the trial at considerable length, concluding as follows : 

"Your petitioners believe that this is a case calling for executive clemency. 
They believe that the court would have granted a new trial had Good's attorney 
remained to ask for it. They believe the jury would have promptly acquitted him 
had the character of the prosecuting witness been known. They believe he would 
have been acquitted had he been properly' defended. They believe ho is innocent. 
As Good will undoubtedly return to his family, and again become a citizen of Mt. 
Vernon, should your Excellency grant him a pardon, your petitioners most cer- 
tainly would not ask that the plenary powers of the executive be exercised did they 
entertain any doubt of the innocence of James Good. But, believing him to be 
innocent, and only the unfortunate victim of a vile strumpet and an ignorant 
blockhead, miscalled an attorney, they pray your Excellency to grant him a par- 
don, firmly believing that in so doing you will but restore an innocent man to his 
rightful liberty." 

The judge adds this indorsement: "The within statement of evidence is sub- 
stantially correct, and I respectfully recommend that a pardon be granted said 
Good." 

The prosecuting attorney, in his statement, says : 

"That the character of the prosecuting witness was at that time wholly unknown 
to him. That he is now informed and believes that said prosecuting witness is a 
common prostitute of bad character. That Good's attorney was a stranger, and 
left the city of Mt. Vernon soon after the trial without making any motion for a 
new trial or in arrest of judgment, and that said attorney made no attack upon 
the character of the prosecuting witness, which was consequently unknown to the 
jury trying the case. The undersigned is therefore of the opinion that this is a 
proper case for the exercise of executive clemency, and in view of the fact that 
said Good has been confined in the State's Prison for more than one year, would 
respectfully recommend that a pardon be granted him." 

The warden reports : 

"The within named James Good has been a very good man during his imprison- 
ment here. He does not seem to be the kind of a man that would commit a rape." 

The prisoner has served more than eighteen months of a term that may have 
been undeserved. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

66. Caleb Johnson", who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 26th day of June, 1877, to be 



86 

imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned July 29, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The petition- 
ers for the prisoner's pardon include the judge and clerk of the court, several 
jurors, two of the judges of the superior court of Marion count}', my immediate 
predecessor in office, and other members of the bar and citizens of the county. 
They say: 

"We are informed and believe that since his imprisonment he has conducted 
himself quietly and peaceably, and in such a way as to satisfy us that he has already 
been punished enough; that, if released, he will in the future keep out of bad 
company and behave himself. We are also informed that he is, to a certain 
amount, the support and aid of a widowed mother, whom he aided by his work 
and labor while he was at liberty, and to whom he was a dutiful and loving son. 
He is young; has been in prison now some time. For all of the above reasons 
we would respectfully ask that he be granted a pardon." 

The application was made March 22. I fixed upon the expiration of thirteen 
months as a proper time to comply with the prayer. The warden reports that his 
conduct is good. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

67. William L. Irving, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of bigamv, and sentenced on the 21st day of May, 1878, to be 
imprisoned for the term of ninety days. Pardoned July 29, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the jail of Marion county. Decision: By the Governor. The 
judge and the clerk of the court, the sheriff and auditor of Marion county, and 
others, have signed a petition reciting the fact of the defendant's conviction and 
sentence, and representing to me "that he has heretofore borne a good character, 
and belongs to a good and highly respectable family; that his parents are aged, 
and sick at this time; and, further, that said Irving has paid the fine and costs," 
and they "respectfully but earnestly pray a pardon for him of the remaining por- 
tion of said term." The prosecuting attorney writes: 

"I recommend the pardon of William L. Irving upon the ground that his offense 
was not of such a character as to call for vindictive punishment, yet it was a clear 
violation of the criminal law. It was upon that ground that the punishment was 
placed at the lowest point permitted by law, and as the law has been vindicated, 
and defendant has heretofore borne a good character, executive clemency will not 
be misplaced." 

The prisoner has served seventy days. The prayer of the officers who procured 
the conviction and entered the judgment is entitled to respect. The pardon .is 
granted. J- T\ W. 

68. Adam Griswold, who was convicted, in the Wayne Circuit Court, of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 30th day of November, 1876, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned July 30, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. This applica- 
tion was received January 9, 1878. The petition then filed is signed by the own- 
ers of the property taken, the Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, and a large number 
of other citizens of Wayne county, and recites that he was "convicted in the 
Wayne Circuit Court for stealing a barrel of tallow from the firm of S. R. Wig- 
gins & Son, in the city of Richmond, Wayne county; that said Griswell is now in 
the penitentiary at Jeffersonville, and has been from December 1, 1876; that he 
was confined in the county jail for a period of three months before his trial and 



87 

conviction ; that he is a German by birth, and little acquainted with the English 
language; that he is a person of weak mind, almost bordering on idiocy; that he 
has, at the city of Richmond, a wife and one child, who are both invalids, and have 
no means of support or income except from public charity. Wherefore your peti- 
tioners pray that he may be pardoned." 

Three of the jurors certified the substantial facts of the case, as developed by 
the evidence in the cause, and added a recommendation of pardon. The injured 
firm addressed me, saying : " We cheerfully signed the petition, for the reason 
that we think he has been sufficiently punished (having served one year) for the 
part he took in the crime. The right man was never put on trial. Adam was 
used because of his position as our employe, and because he was a man incapable 
of consequences. He probably knows enough not to steal. He is a man, however 
of very small calibre of mind, and, if responsible for his acts, he is not more than 
that. He has a wife and one child that need the care that he is able to give them 
from his labor. His relatives are of the most respectable and trusty of our Ger- 
man population. They will see to it that he commits no such offense again." 

The warden's clerk wrote that his conduct had been very good since his com- 
mitment. 

The late Mayor of the city urged a pardon, saying "the act would receive the 
universal commendation of all who understand the circumstances of this case." 

After examination of the case, as thus made, I requested the judge's recom- 
mendation. He replied, saying: "I have a letter before me signed Samuel R. 
Downey, secretary, in which it is stated that the Governor desires my recommend- 
ation. The cause of the delay in answering is this : The facts of the case having 
passed out of my mind, I called the attention of the Prosecuting (Attorney?) to 
the case, and was informed by him that there was nothing in the facts of the case 
that would call for executive clemency. I then sought for the prosecuting wit- 
nesses, and have been able to see one only until this morning. The property stolen 
was a barrel of tallow, weighing four hundred pounds, at eight cents per pound. 
The circumstances of the taking showed a deliberate purpose to commit larceny 
without an extenuating circumstance. The property was owned by Wiggins & 
Son. I receive my information from the son. The father has signed the petition 
for a pardon on the grounds, as I am informed, of the suffering condition of his 
family, of which I know nothing. I have no recollection that the petition was 
presented to me to sign. Informed as I am now, I should not have signed it." 

I thereupon refused a pardon. The prisoner has now been in confinement, as I 
understand, two full years. He must have gained more than a month of good time 
by good conduct. A pardon is now due him. 

The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

69. William M. Hunt, who was convicted in the Morgan Circuit Court of 
the crime of burglary, and sentenced, on the 5th day. of May, 1877, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned August 10, 1 878, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. This application 
was made May 16, 1878. The petition is signed by the judge of the court, ten 
attorneys, four county officers and other citizens of Morgan county. They say: 

" He was nineteen years of age ; had then and still has a wife and an infant 
child. James R. Ogan, Wm. McMillan and Henry Bellows were also indicted and 
imprisoned on the same charge and for the same transaction. In view of the fact 



88 

that he was, in all probability, influenced by others to engage in said crime.thathe 
has already been imprisoned one year, that he did not commit perjury to save him- 
self, but fully confessed his complicity in said transaction, that he is young, a mar- 
ried man and a father, and that he will, as we believe, never engage in anything 
of the kind again, but lead a better life; therefore, we earnestly petition your 
Excellency to pardon the said William M. Hunt." 

James H. Jordan writes: 

"I was appointed, by the court, special prosecuting attorney on behalf of the 
State. By agreement, the case was submitted to a jury on the plea of guilty, for 
the assessment of punishment. A part of the jury was opposed to substituting im- 
prisonment in the jail for that of the State prison, on account of the expense it 
would entail on the county ; hpnce, in order to make a verdict, they were compel- 
led to affix it at two years in the penitentiary. Did the interest of the public and 
the vindication of the law of our great commonwealth demand that the young man 
should be longer confined, I would not advise his release, but, in my opinion, they 
do not. I, therefore, considering all of the circumstances in the case, recommend 
him for executive clemency and request that your Excellency grant to him a 
pardon." 

The prisoner has served more than fifteen months. The warden reports that his 
conduct has been very good indeed, and that he would not hesitate to recommend 
his pardon. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

70. James Matthews, who was convicted, in the Cass Circuit Court, of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 4th day of May, 1877, to be impris- 
oned for the term of two years. Pardoned August 12, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. This applica- 
tion was made May 1, 1878, by the judge of the court, who said: 

"In April, 1877, James Matthews was convicted in the Cass Circuit Court for 
stealing a coat, worth, perhaps, ten dollars, in the year 1864. I was the Prosecut- 
ing Attorney that framed the bill, and on the trial called the Hon. John C. Nelson 
to try the cause. Matthews was sentenced for two years, it being the lowest pun- 
ishment under the law at that time. In consideration of the antiquity of the of- 
fense, and the change made in the law since that time, and of Matthews' good con- 
duct in prison, and of his promise to ' go West and grow up with the oountry,' I 
recommend his pardon. His punishment was severe, considering the great length 
of time since the offense was committed, and the value of the property stolen." 

Judge Nelson writes : 

"The facts, as they appeared on the trial, were about as follows: He went into 
the house of the prosecuting witness, in daylight, and took the property, a dress 
coat, partially worn out, and of the value of about six to seven dollars, and wore 
it off. He was found shortly afterward, and was partially intoxicated. He made 
no denial of the theft, but insisted he was so intoxicated that he did not know 
what he was doing. At the time of the trial, the law now in force increasing the 
value of the goods stolen to constitute grand larceny had not gone into effect, so 
that the jury had no discretion but to fix his punishment at not less than two years. 
I am of the opinion that, if they could have made his penalty imprisonment in the 
county jail, they would have done so. At the time he was arrested, he had come 
to the court house in obedience to a summons as a witness, and was recognized by 



89 

the former Prosecuting Attorney. Before that, he had been living in the county 
for some time, carrying on his trade, that of blacksmith. In view of the facts sur- 
rounding the case, I am of the opinion that it appeals strongly to your pardoning 
power, and do heartily recommend that he be now pardoned." 

The Prosecuting Attorney writes ; 

"Shortly after my qualification as Prosecuting Attorney of the Twenty-ninth 
Judicial Circuit of Indiana, James Matthews was arrested upon an indictment re- 
turned in 1864, during the war, for the larceny of a coat of the value of about 
seven dollars. He was tried and convicted. The evidence disclosed that he was 
intoxicated at the time of the larceny, and made no effort of importance to escape, 
but was found with the stolen property a few miles away. The cause had slept 
thirteen years when Matthews was arrested in the court house, and, ht the time of 
his trial, the act changing the limit of petit larceny to fifteen dollars from five dol- 
lars had been passed, but not certified, thus making it necessary that he should be 
sentenced to the penitentiary for two years, and he was so sentenced, and has now 
served more than one year. I think that his case is one in which an exercise of 
executive clemency is proper and right, and I hereby recommend that he be par- 
doned. : " 

The clerk adds : 

"I heartily concur in the above recommendation." 

The warden reports the prisoner's conduct good. He has now served more than 
fifteen months. Under the act of March 11, 1861, he would be entitled to a deduc- 
tion of thirty-six days from his term of service. The act modifying the penalty 
for larceny was approved March 3, 1877, (acts of 1877, page 63) but did not be- 
come a law until July 2, 1877, after due publication. This prisoner is entitled to a 
release. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

71. Richard Mosiek, who was convicted in the Sullivan Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 16th day of April, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned August 16th, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The peti- 
tion was received April 23, 1878. It is signed by officers and citizens of Sullivan 
county, and by the judge, prosecuting attorney, and clerk of the court. They say: 

" The evidence on which he was convicted was conflicting. He contended and 
insisted he was not guilty of the larceny, but that one William Clark (since sent to 
the same prison for three years for burglary) was the guilty person, had stolen the 
money and had induced Mosier to take part of it, Mosier being in a state of intoxica- 
tion at the time, and not sufficiently at himself to distinguish right from wrong. Mo- 
sier is a harmless fellow and of feeble intellect, so that he should be excusable to some 
extent for any misconduct, and we think his confinement in prison to this time is 
ample punishment for any guilt that may have attached to him, and respectfully 
urge upon your Excellency that justice and mercy will both be accomplished by 
his pardon. He has been industrious and well-behaved, as we are informed, since 
in prison, and we ask, in view of all the premises, that you exercise the right con- 
ferred upon you by law, and pardon said Richard Mosier. And we will ever 
pray." 

The prisoner has now served sixteen months. The warden reports his conduct 
good. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 



90 

72. William H. McMillan, who was convicted, in the Morgan Circuit Court' 
of the crime of burglary, and sentenced, on the 16th day of May, 1877, to be im- 
prisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned August 22, 1878, and released from 
confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. This applica- 
tion was made March 27, 1878. The clerk of the court and the sheriff, auditor and 
treasurer of Morgan county, in a petition then filed, say : 

"In consideration that said William H. McMillan is of weak mind, and was 
drawn into this offense by the persuasions of his associates in said crime ; that he 
at all other times bore a good character for honesty and industry ; and in further 
consideration that his mother and a widowed sister, who is left with a large family 
of small children, greatly need his services, as well as the further fact that his pun 
ishment has been sufficient for his participation in the crime aforesaid, of his par- 
ticipation in which he fully told, pleading guilty to the charge, and believing that 
he is now fully repentant and resolved to lead an honest life, we hereby recom- 
mend and unite with his bereaved mother and sisters in asking his pardon at your 
Excellency's hands, and, as in duty bound, will ever pray, etc." 

In reply to a request for his opinion and recommendation, the judge of the court 
wrote that he was not present at the trial, but that Judge Pearson presided. Judge 
Pearson replied : 

" Not remembering very distinctly the case referred to, 1 wrote the Clerk of 
Morgan county, and inclose his answer. If I remember, there was no evidence or 
statement made on the plea of guilty, but, from what I heard of the matter at the 
time, I think the clerk's version is correct, and have no doubt but that his punish- 
ment is but commensurate with his offense." 

The clerk, in his letter to the judge, says : 

"I find that W. H. McMillan pleaded guilty to the crime of burglary and lar- 
ceny in May, 1877, and was sentenced for two years in the penitentiary by your 
Honor. You will recollect the circumstances. They are as follows : McMillan, 
Bellows, Hunt and Ogan robbed a store at Paragon, this county, took the goods to 
Indianapolis and there sold them, dividing the money. It may be an act ot kind- 
ness to the young man's mother to reprieve him, but, as to the young man himself, 
I don't think it would, for, unless he has changed very considerable, I think he is 
past redemption, from what I can hear of him." 

The Prosecuting Attorney, in his reply, recommends a pardon, and says : 

" The whole unfortunate affair would probably never have occurred, had it not 
been that Mr: James R. Ogan, in the kindness of his heart, permitted one Henry 
Bellows to remain at his house and work at his marble shop. Bellows is Mr- 
Ogan's wife's brother. He had been in the House of Correction in Ohio twice be- 
fore he came to this State; and, Governor, you know how one bad boy may con- 
taminate many other boys and lead them into the commission of crime when they 
would never think of such a thing otherwise." 

The warden reports the prisoner's conduct good. 

The prison physician says : 

" He is not able to perform hard labor." 



91 

It also appears that, "if he should, at any time, be attacked with any of the 
severe types of fever, he would probably die from want of the ordinary constitu- 
tional recuperative powers." He has served more than fifteen months. Ogan and 
Hunt have already been pardoned. The pardcn is granted. J. D. W. 

73. Samuel T. Caplinger, who was convicted in the Jetferson Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 25th day of February, 1875 r 
to be imprisoned for the term of five years. Pardoned August 27, 1878. and 
released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. 

. The petition for the defendant's pardon was made October 9, 1876, by citizens of 
I Madison. They expressed the belief that his punishment had been sufficient. 
Eight jurors, in a petition received at the same time, say that the defendant was 
by them "found guilty of the charge, but under the peculiar circumstances of the 
case and the fact that another person was connected with the transaction who plead 
guilty thereto and then testified against said Caplinger," and that they believe him 
entitled to executive clemency. The county officers, the prosecuting attorney and 
three additional jurors signed a third petition, expressing the opinion "that he has 
already suffered punishment sufficient for the offense." The judge says: 

"I learn that he has behaved well since his imprisonment, and I have reason to 
believe if he were pardoned now, before his time is out, it will tend greatly to his 
permanent reformation. I would, therefore, contrary to my custom in such mat- 
ters, respectfully request your Excellency to grant him a pardon for the residue of 
his term, as I believe the ends of justice will be fully vindicated thereby." 

Judge Cravens and Mayor Brashear con cur .in the views of Judge Allison thus 
expressed, and unite in the application for the pardon. The prisoner has served 
three years and six months, and, as reported by the warden, has behaved well. 
The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

74. Simpson Woollen, who was convicted in the Vigo Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of murder, and sentenced on the 11th day of June, 1874, to be 
imprisoned for the term of his natural life. Pardoned September 3, 1878, and 

. released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. 
This application was commenced December 12, 1876, by the defendant's brother. 
My predecessor requested the opinion and recommendation of the judge of the 
court. He replied, giving a very full and particular statement of the facts which 
resulted in the prisoner's conviction and sentence, and expressed the opinion that 
the evidence justified the verdict of the jury. In conclusion he said : 

"In the response I have made, I would not, however, wish it thought for a 
moment that I would willingly lay a straw in the way of a pardon to the prisoner; 
because on account of his family surroundings, and for other reasons, there is 
enlisted a large share of my sympathy." 

Upon the case as thus made, a pardon was refused by my predecessor, December 
20, 1876. I was asked to examine the case, and did so, and decided, June 28, 1877, 
that I could not grant a pardon. In June last, the ease was again pressed upon 
my consideration, but I deferred action until this day. The treasurer, clerk, sheriff, 
auditor, and recorder of Vigo county, the prosecuting attorney, the judge of the 
circuit court, and the mayor, clerk, treasurer, marshal, and chief of police of the 
city of Terre Haute, by a petition received June 22, 1878, ask that I grant the 
defendant a pardon, and say: 



92 



"We make this recommendation because a great mass of the people in this com- 
munity believe that Woollen is innocent, and all agree that his conviction was 
procured through the testimony of women whose characters for veracity are im- 
peachable, and whose characters for morality won't bear investigation." 

All but one of the jurors, by petition, ask that a pardon be granted. The judge 
adds: 

"I concur in the foregoing petition." 

The city marshal has made me a written statement of the facts which came to 
his knowledge before and since the conviction, and expresses the opinion that a 
pardon would meet the universal approbation of the citizens of Terre Haute. 

The judge, by letter, says: 

"I believe it to be the almost universal feeling ©f our citizens that Woollen 
should now be pardoned. Your Excellency has already pardoned Parsons and 
Sullivan, which action I believe to be universally approved. We have always 
thought here, however, that association with them led Woollen into his trouble, 
and that he was less guilty than they, I earnestly recommend the granting of the 
pardon." 

My decision in the case of Parsons and Sullivan (q. v.) recites facts pertinent to 
this decision. It is clear that the prisoner should not be longer held. He has 
conducted himself well in prison. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

75. John Poe, who was convicted in the Morgan Circuit Court of the crime 
of burglary, and sentenced, on the 15th day of December, 1877, to be imprisoned 
for the term of two years. Pardoned September 3, 1878, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. The petition is 
signed by nine jurors and other citizens of Morgan county. They represent that 
the defendant, when convicted, was a youth of but sixteen years, and that since his 
conviction, circumstances have been brought to light that make it extremely 
doubtful as to his guilt, and they ask that executive clemency be interposed. 

James H. Jordan presided at the trial, and says : 

"This boy Poe, had been suspected of committing crime, and a detective of the 
railroad company undertook to trap him, and by agreement with the detective it 
was arranged that Poe should break into the depot at Mooresville. He did so, and 
stole a pair of boots. For this he was tried, and sentenced to the State Prison 
South for two years. Considering his age, which is said to be sixteen years only, I 
deem the punishment too severe. Under all the circumstances, I therefore recom- 
mend his pardon." 

Judge Kobinson says : 

"The sentence was a severe one, considering the age of the boy and the partic- 
ular offense for which he was tried, but the evidence convinced the jury, and my- 
self as well, that Poe was a bad boy and addicted to criminal behavior. He was 
past the age for admission to the House of Eefuge, and it was not thought that a con- 
finement in the county jail would have any beneficial effect upon him. His asso- 
ciations about Mooresville were bad and dangerous to his own morals and to the 
public good. Hence, the sentence to the penitentiary. I have been told that his 
parents contemplate removing to the West, and wish to take him along. If they 



93 

would do so, I would heartily join in the request for pardon. The punishment he 
has suffered would doubtless be of greater benefit than a greater amount if he were 
given an opportunity to form new associations in a community new to him. 1 
question the propriety of returning him to Mooresville, among his former compan- 
ions, and doubt whether it would result in his own or the public's good." 

The prisoner's father assures me that he is now prepared to start West, and take 
his boy. I agree with the judge in his opinion that his boy should not be allowed 
to return to his former home and associations, and will issue the pardon condi- 
tioned, that the defendant shall at once leave the State and remain away there- 
from, and subject to revocation for a violation of the condition. The prisoner I 
has behaved well. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

76. Joseph Smith, who was convicted in the "Warrick Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 11th day of January, 1876, to be 
imprisoned for the term of seven years. Pardoned September 3, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. This 
application was commenced July 18, 1877, by a petition of citizens, who say: 

"That for many years we were neighbors and acquaintances of said Joseph 
Smith, and knew him to be a sober, industrious mechanic of good habits and excel- 
lent character; that he has a wife and child dependent on him for support, and 
we believe, is a worthy subject for executive clemency, and it being shown by the 
confession of Aaron Bird that he, and not Smith, is guilty of the crime of whieh 
Smith was convicted, we respectfully petition for the pardon of said Joseph 
Smith." 

The judge adds : 

"The principal, and, if I recollect right, the only witness that swore to Smith's 
participation in stealing the mules was Aaron Bird. Smith was convicted on the 
testimony of Bird. I was judge at the time. From what Bird now says, it seems 
that Smith is a proper subject for executive clemency." 

Eight jurors, by petition, say they "feel confident that in justice he ought to be 
released from further confinement, and do, therefore, respectfully petition for his 
pardon." Aaron Bird has made an affidavit, in which he says: 

"That he is well acquainted with one Joseph Smith, who is now confined in the 
penitentiary south upon the charge of grand larceny, sentenced from Warrick 
County Circuit Court at its January term, 1876 ; that the crime of grand larceny 
charged against him was the unlawful and felonious taking away of two mules of 
the value of $175, the property of James Bunda; that of my own knowledge I 
know said Joseph Smith to be innocent of said charge and wrongfully confined in 
said penitentiary. Said affiant further says that he, affiant, and one Henry Davis, 
unlawfully took and carried away said mules from said James Bunda; that said 
Joseph Smith had no hand whatever in the larceny of said mules, and had no con- 
nection whatever with it; and, in fact, knew nothing of the matter until the crime 
had been committed. Affiant further states that he and said Henry Davis are now 
confined in said penitentiary upon said charge of the larceny of the mules afore- 
said." Several county officers have joined in the prayer for pardon. The prose- 
cuting attorney, in concluding his statement, says: 

"I believe that he was guilty as charged in the indictment. Now, this is true: 
Smith has a respectable wife and a young child dependent upon his sister for sup- 



94 

port; he is a young man himself; his criminal career was short; previous to which 
I have understood from several sources (and never heard it disputed) he was a very- 
good young man. He has already heen punished as much as others for the same 
kind of offense, and if his prison record is good he would seem to he, under all the 
circumstances, a fit subject for executive clemency. The influences that would be 
thrown around him if pardoned would be good. If his pardon should be au error 
it would be upon the side of mercy, and justice could not complain, as her demands 
have been pretty well satisfied." 

The prisoner has now served more than two years and a half. The warden 
reports that his conduct has been good. I am advised by telegram from a physi- 
cian at Evansville that "his child is now at the point of death and his wife sick 
also." The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

77. Robert Eeese, who was convicted in the Johnson Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny and sentenced, on the 13th day of February, 1877, to 
be imprisoned for the term of three years. Pardoned September 4, 1878, and re- 
leased from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. 
Citizens of Johnson county, including the sheriff, clerk, auditor and recorder and 
nine attorneys, represent to me by petition that the defendant was jointly indicted 
with John Richie; that the larceny consisted in taking four pieces of meat of the 
value of eleven dollars ; that when he committed the offense Reese was a person 
•of very limited means and had a family depending on him for support and that 
hisfpart of the meat, with the exception of a small portion used by his family, was 
restored to the owner ; that this was his first offense and he had before borne a good 
reputation; and that since his conviction he has evinced a disposition of repent- 
ance. In their opinion, he will, if pardoned, return and lead an honest and honor- 
able life and they ask that he be pardonod at the expiration of one year. The 
judge and prosecuting attorney, under date of December 20, 1877, say: 

"We have been shown the petition of Reese for a pardon, which has been signed 
by some of the prominent citizens of Johnson county. We would say that the 
names are of some of the mostprominent men of the county and is worthy of a 
respectful consideration. The property stolen was proved to be of the value of 
between ten dollars and eleven dollars and, under all the facts, we think the pen- 
alty inflicted rather severe. We respectfully recommend that after Reese has been 
confined in the State prison one year from the date of the judgment, that you grant 
him a pardon, believing that the ends of justice would be fully met by his con- 
finement for one year." 

The prisoner has now served more than one-half his term. The warden reports 
that his conduct has been good. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

78. George Hogarty, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 4th day of June, 1877, 
to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned September 10, 1878, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor: 
Directly after his conviction and sentence the defendant asked that his sentence be 
commuted by substituting for his confinement in the State's prison his commitment 
to the House of Refuge. That application was refused. This application for his 
pardon was made April 24, 1878. In his petition the prisoner expresses his belief 
that the punishment already undergone is ample for the crime charged, and that 
the demands of justice have been satisfied. He asks the exercise of executive clem- 



95 

ency in his behalf, "believing that, in such an event, the interests of society will in 
no wise be harmed, and that a young man will be given an opportunity of reform 
and become a useful and reputable citizen." 

The judge, prosecuting attorney, and clerk of the court, the sheriff, auditor, 
recorder, and treasurer of Marion county, and other citizens, respectfully join in 
the defendant's petition and ask his pardon. The copy of the indictment filed 
shows that he was charged with stealing "thirty spools of thread, each of the value 
of six cents, eight corset strings, each of the value of three cents, and three paste- 
board boxes, each of the value of two cents," and the petition shows that he was 
convicted upon a plea of guilty. He has now been imprisoned more than fifteen 
months. The warden reports that his conduct has been good. The pardon is 
granted. J. D. W. 

79. Frank Livingston, who was convicted in the Vigo Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of forgery and sentenced, on the 12th day of June, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned September 12, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. In May 
last, the warden addressed me saying : 

" Convict Frank Livingston, when in good health, was a good prisoner. He has 
always seemed like a well-disposed man. He has an uncle living in Missouri who 
is well-to-do in a financial way, and would give him a home if he were pardoned. 
He was sentenced by the Vigo Criminal Circuit Court, on the 12th day of June, 1877, 
for two years for forgery. His pardon is recommended. Keference is made to the 
accompanying physician's certificate." 

The physician says : 

" He has valvular disease of the heart with nervous debility. Said Livingston 
has been an inmate of the hospital for the last six months. I pronounce his case 
beyond the reach of medicine. He cannot render any service to the State, and in 
the present crowded condition of the prison is a heavy tax upon the institution. 
It does seem to me that he is a fit subject for executive clemency and that his pardon 
would not only be an act of justice but of humanity." 

Some kind ladies who visit the prison and teach the prisoners have written me, 
under date of August 26th last, saying: 

" He is evidently failings We visited him yesterday and found such to be the 
case. His sufferings were intense, "We understand from the officers of. the prison 
and others that you kindly promised clemency towards this unfortunate man. 
We would earnestly pray your excellency to give Livingston's case your imme- 
diate consideration. He will, if released, go at once to a relative who will take 
care of him." 

In a recent letter, the prisoner says: 

" I have been in the hospital for the last ten months. I have a disease of the 
heart. I am liable to die at any moment, as Dr. Sherrod informed you when here. 
I have friends to go to and hope you will release me right away, for to remain 
here is to die here. My charge is forgery for three dollars and the money the 
man owed me for work that I had done for him. I was sent to the prison for two 
years. Sixteen months of this time I have already served." 

The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 



96 

80. "William Kurtz, who was convicted in the Tippecanoe Circuit Court of 
the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 9th day of October, 1877, to he 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned September 26th, 1878, and re- 
leased from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. 
This application was received October 16,1877. The defendant was charged with 
the theft of fome clothing, a pocket-book, revolver, razor, whip, collar and cuffs, 
the property of Milton Morehouse. Citizens and officers of Lafayette and the 
county officers of Tippecanoe county showed by petitions that the conviction was 
upon a plea of guilty to the indictment, and asked that a pardon be granted. The 
prosecuting attorney signed a petition and made me a statement in writing in 
which he says : 

"The evidence in the case before the grand jury was substantially as follows: 
On Sunday, about time alleged in indictment, when prosecuting witness Milton 
Moorehouse was absent with his family, his house was entered by defendant who, 
then and there, carried away the goods set out in the indictment. The house, at 
the time, was not locked or fastened. On Sunday following the losing of the 
goods, a portion of the clothing with the revolver was found on the person of the 
defendant Kurtz while he was on the camp-meeting ground at Battle Ground in 
this county. He was arrested then and there, and at once confessed the commis- 
sion of the larceny as charged, and gave up the balance of the goods. A short 
time previous to [the] larceny, the defendant had been in employ of said Moore- 
house, living in his family." 

I refused to grant a pardon at that time, but consented to consider the case after 
the expiration of one year. In May last, I received a petition from the parents of 
the boy, in which they say: 

"Your petitioners further show that the offense was committed at a time when 
our son was under the influence of liquor to such an extent that he was not account- 
able for his acts, and we feel that he has been sufficiently punished, and if liberated 
will hereafter live honestly and uprightly. Your petitioners further show that 
they are poor and live by their own labor, and that they stand greatly in need of 
the services of their son in the conduct and proper cultivation of a tarm on which 
they are endeavoring to gain a livelihood, and they fully believe, from the protesta- 
tions made by their son, that if he is liberated he will return to your petitioners 
and be faithful and obedient." 

The present prosecuting attorney and prominent citizens of the county cheer- 
fully recommend the granting of their prayer for pardon. The judge of the 
court writes: 

""Within the last year one "William Kurtz, the son of an old and respectable cit- 
izen, was brought before me on a charge of larceny. He pleaded guilty and I 
sentenced him for two years. His father tells me that a petition is before you for 
his pardon. Prom what 1 can learn, I think it would be proper to pardon him. 
He is young, and 1 think he will hereafter behave himself." 

I am advised by telegraph that the prisoner's father " is at the point of death 
and wants to see his boy." The warden reports that the prisoner's conduct has 
been good. The pardon is granted. J. D. "W. 



97 

81. Charles W. Blankenship, who was convicted in the Putnam Circuit 
Court of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 15th day of September, 
1877, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned September 28, 1878, 
and released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Gov- 
ernor. The petition for the prisoner's pardon, received June 25, 1878, is signed by 
the sheriff, treasurer, clerk, auditor and recorder of Putnam county, the prosecuting 
attorney, the mayor and marshal of the city of Greencastle, and members of the 
bar and other citizens ©f the county. It shows that the prisoner is a boy of about 
seventeen or eighteen years of age, and was convicted upon his plea of "guilty to 
the charge of larceny in the stealing of a shot gun and a few personal trinkets;" 
that he "was influenced and misled by an elder brother, who has since been sen- 
tenced to said prison by the Morgan Circuit Court on a charge of horse stealing; 
that said Charles W. is not naturally vicious, but easily influenced, and was very 
largely controlled by said brother; that he is of very delicate health, with a ten- 
dency to lung disease, and, as the elder brother is now in prison, it is believed that 
said Charles can be reformed by his parents and made a good member of society ; 
that a pardon will not only be highly appreciated by his parents, but reformatory 
and beneficial to the boy." The collector of internal revenue for the Seventh Dis- 
trict of Indiana says : 

" I further state to your Excellency that I have known the family for a great 
number of years, and that I believe the facts herein stated to be true, and heartily 
join in the request that said boy be liberated." 

In reply to my request for his opinion and recommendation the judge says : 

" I have no information or belief as to the existence of any state ef facts in the 
case of young Blankenship beyond sympathy for his parents that calls for execu- 
tive clemency." 

I am informed that an accomplice of the prisoner is at large on parol granted 
upon his plea of guilty. Upon report of good conduct a pardon will issue. 

J. D. W. 

82. William Furnish, who was convicted m the Switzerland Circuit Court 
of the crime of arson, and sentenced^ on the 8th day of November, 1875, to be 
imprisoned for the term of three years. Pardoned October 2, 1878, and his right 
of suffrage remitted unto him. Decision : By the Governor. This application for 
the defendant's pardon was filed October 27, 1876. The petition of officers and 
citizens of Switzerland county represented that the prisoner had been from his 
youth afflicted with a disease in his head, totally unfitting him for the performance 
of labor of any kind, and requiring great care and attention. 

The warden reported, December 14, 1876: 

"William Furnish is afflicted with ulceration in both ears, partial deafness, so 
great at times that he can not hear loud conversation, and with neuralgia of the 
face, so far affecting the muscles of the same at times as to draw his mouth to one 
side. He is blind in one eye, and it is suggested by Dr. Sherrod that the facial 
neuralgia may be the result of the diseased condition of the eye." 

His conduct has been good. Decision was then made as follows : 

"I think the case does not justify a pardon at this time. It may be proper after 
he has been in prison over one-half his sentence. 

December 16, 1876. T. A. H." 

7 Pardons. 



98 

"When I visited the prison, the prisoner was satisfied to receive a pardon after 
release from confinement. He has, by good conduct, under the act of March 11, 
1861, gained his discharge. A few days yet remain of the term of sentence, and 
the judgment is yet in force against him to his prejudice. He is deserving of this 
further act of clemency. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

83. Louis Jacobs, who was convicted in the Yanderburg Circuit Court of the 
crime of obtaining goods by false pretenses, and sentenced, on the 16th day of 
October, 1877, to be imprisoned for the term of three years. Pardoned October 3, 
1878, and released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the 
Governor. The petition for the defendant's pardon is signed by the judge and pros- 
ecuting attorney of the court, the clerk, auditor, sheriff and treasurer of Vander- 
burgh county, and ten attorneys. They say : 

" The proof showed that Louis Jacobs took two horses and a wagon to the store of 
one August Smith and there gave a mortgage on the team for a load of tin-ware, 
representing the horses and wagon to be his. Then said Jacobs and the owner of 
the team, one Harris Freedman, left the city and sold the goods in company, as ped- 
lers, in the county of Spencer. At Rockport, in said county, they separated, Jacobs 
receiving some nine dollars as his part of the profits and Harris keeping all the 
produce and shipping it to Evansville for his own use and benefit. Jacobs then 
went to Cincinnati where his wife and children resided. There was but little evi- 
dence in the case. The defendant contended that the whole matter was understood 
between himself and Harris; that tht mortgage was given for the purpose of get- 
ting goods to peddle, and that the produce and moneys taken in exchange for the 
goods were to be sold and the proceeds applied to the payment of the mortgage. 
Jacobs was not a business man in the true sense of the term, and evidently had but 
little experience in matters of this kind, and could have been easily imposed upon 
and made to believe the transaction was right and proper by such a shrewd man 
as Harris Freedman. Your petitioners believe him to be innocent of any inten- 
tion to defraud August Smith, but that he was the victim of Freedman there can 
be no doubt. Believing that the law has been fully vindicated, and that he has 
fully atoned for this crime and been sufficiently punished; that he has a wife and 
three children dependent upon him for subsistence, and that his character hereto- 
fore for honesty and fair dealing was good, we unite in this petition, and ask your 
Excellency to exercise your executive clemency in this case." 

Almost one year has been served. Upon report of good conduct a pardon wil] 
issue to the prisoner. J. D. W. 

84. Orlando C, Palmer, who was convicted in the St. Joseph Circuit Court 
of the crime of burglary, and sentenced, on the 16th day of October, 1876, to be 
imprisoned for the term of three years. Pardoned October 15, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. This 
application was commenced March 16, 1878. The county officers of St Joseph 
county, and the senator from the district of which it forms a part, represented 
"that the facts shown against him was [were] the entry in a store by means of 
false key; that he is said to have been of previous good habits and excellent repu- 
tation, but, having been led away by dissolute associates; that he is a young man 
not at all hardened in crime, and we [they] would recommend him to executive 
clemency." 

Other citizens, by petitions, made like representations. 



99 

Judge Stanfield wrote me: 

"A year ago last October, I sentenced Orlando C. Palmer, a young man of 
Mishawawka, to the State's prison on a charge [of] burglary and stealing some 
cigars. He plead guilty, and I made the imprisonment three years. He was 
raised in Mishawaka, and had maintained a good reputation before, but had got 
into intemperate habits without many people knowing it. Leading citizens of that 
place have just been to see me. They assure me that the young man's conduct has 
been good while in prison, that it is the common opinion in his old place of resi- 
dence that he has been sufficiently punished, and that he will, if pardoned, live an 
honest and useful life. My knowledge of the citizens who interest themselves in 
young Palmer's pardon assures me that it is the common desire of his neighbors 
that he should be pardened, and that they believe that he will hereafter live an 
honest life. I therefore recommend him to you as a fit subject for executive 
clemency." 

The prisoner this day completes two years of his term. Good conduct would 
secure a release in less than ten months more. The warden reports that his con- 
duct has been good. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

85. Lewis Bishop, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of assault and battery with intent to kill and murder, and sentenced, on 
the 20th day of April, 1875, to be imprisoned for the term of ten years. Pardoned 
October 15, 1878, and released from confinement in the State Prison North. De- 
cision: By the Governor. This application was commenced by a petition received 
September 9, 1876. It is signed by the prisoner's wife, upon whom the battery 
was committed, nine jurors and other citizens of Marion county and recites the 
following : 

" In view of the facts that the trouble grew out of his wife having deserted him 
and taken up with another man; that, at the time he was under the influence of 
liquor, which, whenever he drank it, had a peculiar influence on him, so much 
that at the time of the ^commission of this act he was unable to form a criminal 
intent and the crime was the act of a moment, and Bishop is now in feeble health 
and sincerely repents the act of which he has only a dim recollection. When in 
good health he is an industrious and hard working man. He is the only child of 
[his] widowed mother who is also in poor health and who firmly believes that if 
her son is not soon released he will surely die ; that, if released, during the re- 
mainder of his life, which she thinks will at best be but short, he will lead such a 
life as to atone fully for this act. His wife now admits that she was in the wrong, 
that she brought it on herself and is now anxious to secure his release. "We res- 
pectfully ask that he may be pardoned." 

The clerk, treasurer, auditor, recorder and sheriff of Marion county added : 

"In view of all the above facts, we, the county officers of said county, join in the 
above petition." 

The prosecuting attorney at the time says : 

"I think the petitioner has been sufficiently punished and the circumstances in 
the case fully warrant executive clemency." 

The judge does not recommend a pardon. I understand that the prisoner was 
not represented by counsel upon his trial, and that his defense was, consequently, 
not fully before the jury. He has now served about three and one-half years. 



100 

The warden reports his conduct good. I will impose upon the defendant the con- 
dition that, upon his release, he shall he and continue a soher man, and be subject 
to a recommitment upon violation thereof. The pardon is granted. J. D. "W. 

86. David Stewart, who was convicted, in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court, 
of the crime of assault and battery, and sentenced, on the 27th day of August, 
1878, to be imprisoned for the term of ninety days. Pardoned October 28, 1878, 
and released from confinement in the jail of Marion county. Decision: By the 
Governor. The prisoner has now served sixty days. The judge, prosecuting attor- 
ney, and clerk of the court and the sheriff, recorder, auditor and treasurer of Ma- 
rion county, by petition, ask that the prisoner be now pardoned, because they be- 
lieve he has been sufficiently punished, and ought to be released, so that he can 
assist his wife, who is working as a servant girl for her support. I will impose 
upon him the condition that he keep sober. The pardon is granted. J. D.W. 

87. Frederick Schaeffer, who was convicted, in the Vigo Criminal Circuit 
Court, of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 17th day of July, 
1877, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned October 3], 1878, and 
released from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. 
Citizens of Vigo county, by petition, received July 17, 1878, asked that the defend- 
ant be pardoned at the expiration of one year of his term. The clerk, recorder, 
deputy auditor and treasurer added a like recommendation. The prosecuting at- 
torney, in his letter, says that the defendant was convicted as accessory before the 
fact to the same offense for which his brother, Christian Schaeffer, was convicted,. 
and Christian having been pardoned at the expiration of one-half his term, he is 
of the opinion "that it would be right and proper, and that the ends of justice 
would be subserved, by granting at once a pardon to Frederick Schaeffer." 

Senator D. W. Voorhees adds : 

" I was employed to assist in prosecuting this man, and I most heartily concur 
with the judge and prosecuting attorney that he ought to be pardoned." 

A full shorthand report of the evidence is filed. The judge, under date of Au- 
gust 2, 1878, wrote: 

" For reasons of a local character, which could in no wise interest your Excel- 
lency, I have, up to this time, withheld any recommendation for the pardon of 
Frederick Schaeffer, heretofore convicted of grand larceny in the Vigo Criminal 
Circuit Court; but since the other parties, convicted near the same time, have been 
released, and because the evidence in the case against him only made him out an 
accessory to the crime, I can see no particular reason why he should be punished 
any longer. I am, therefore, willing now to join in the recommendation hereto- 
fore made by other officials of this county for his pardon." 

The warden to-day reports : 

"The conduct of the within-named Frederick Schaeffer has been very good." 

The prisoner has now served more than fifteen months. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 

88. Reed McDaniels, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of manslaughter, and sentenced, on the 21st day of October, 
1869, to be imprisoned for the term of fourteen years. Pardoned November 6, 



101 

1878, and released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the 
Governor. The defendant has now been imprisoned more than nine years. Under 
the act of March 11, 1861, good conduct would shorten his term twelve hundred 
and sixty days, or more than three years. Citizens of Marion county, including 
the judge who presided at the trial, in a petition received February 9, 1878, say: 

"The indictment charges him with striking Lilly Frances McDaniels with his 
hands and kicking with his feet, thereby mortally wounding and bruising her, the 
said Lilly Francis McDaniels. On the trial of the case, it was proven that the 
defendant was addicted to the use of liquor and was intoxicated at the time the 
injuries were inflicted. Dr. Loftin was the principal witness for the State and his 
-statement is appended to this petition. The conduct of McDaniels during his im- 
prisonment, nearly eight years, we understand has been good and, considering this 
fact and that the crime was committed while he was intoxicated, we respectfully 
petition your Excellency to pardon him, and also for the additional reason that we 
are informed that McDaniels' health is very much broken, and if continued in con- 
finement he will not survive the term of his sentence." 

Dr. Loftin, under date of April 20, 1877, addressed me as follows : 

" The undersigned respectfully represents that, at the time of the injury to the 
child, he was called in as a physician to attend her. That he testified at the trial 
that she was improving from her injuries, when three or four weeks afterwards she 
was attacked with typhoid fever, and that she died from the effects of the fever, but 
that her system had previously been weakened from the injuries, and perhaps she 
might have recovered if she had not thus been in a weak condition. I also state 
that I had known McDaniels four or five years before, and was well acquainted 
with his character and habits. When sober, he was industrious and well behaved. 
The dissolute and bad conduct of his wife drove him to drinking, and while 
intoxicated he inflicted the injuries. I earnestly request your Excellency to grant 
him a pardon." 

The warden has twice reported the prisoner's conduct good, and furnished me a 
report by the prison physician. The latter, under date of October 25, 1878, says : 

" I have thoroughly examined Keed McDaniels, and find him suffering from 
bronchitis of the right lung ; his pulse is one hundred per minute, and [he has] a 
constant, troublesome cough. He is very much emaciated, and has very little 
appetite. I think the only chance for his permanent recovery is exercise in the 
open air and relief from this constant confinement." 

The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

89. William S. Watkins, who was convicted in the Orange Circuit Court of 
the crime of murder, and sentenced, on the 10th day of June, 1871, to be impris- 
oned for the term of his natural life. Pardoned November 7, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. This 
application was commenced May 31, 1877, by the defendant and officers and citi- 
zens of Orange county familiar with the facts and circumstances of his crime and 
conviction. Watkins had been in the employ of James Foster as a farm hand, and 
was discharged from his service for a difficulty about feeding a horse. The parties 
met some time afterwards, and Foster, having used abusive language towards him, 
attacked the prisoner with a black-snake wagon-whip. After having struck him 
twice with the lash of the whip, Foster turned the butt of the whip, which was 
loaded. Watkins dodged back, and, in doing so, fell. In rising he seized an axe, 



102 

and with it dealt the blow which caused Foster's death. The defendant claims 
that if he was guilty of any offense it was manslaughter, and not murder, and that 
he has been sufficiently punished for his offense. 

Judge Bicknell, under date of May 22, 1877, addressed me as follows: 

"Governor: A man named Watkins was convicted before me of murder, in the 
Orange Circuit Court, and was sent to the State's prison for life, about six or seven 
years ago. They say he has nearly lost his mind, and I am told that a largely-signed 
and satisfactory petition will be presented to you for his pardon. If that should 
be the case, and if in your opinion the circumstances will warrant a pardon,. please 
consider me as hereby giving my statutory concurrence in the petition." 

I saw the defendant when I last visited the prison. The physician has since 
reported to me as follows: 

" At your request I herewith submit a statement relative to the mental and phys- 
ical condition of W. S. Watkins. His is a clear case of insanity. He has been 
under my charge for the last six months, some of the time in the hospital, but the 
greater portion of the time locked up in his cell. In my judgment, if he was 
returned to his friends, the association and surroundings would have a salutary 
effect, not only upon his mind, but upon his physical condition." 

The warden added this endorsement: 

"The within-named W. S. "Watkins was a good prisoner until his mind became 
affected, about one year ago. He is a monomaniac, grieving continually about hi& 
hard lot in life. I believe that, if pardoned, his mind would be restored, and he 
would make an orderly, good citizen." 

The three directors added: 

"We, the undersigned, directors, concur in the within statements and join in the 
jecommendation for his pardon, believing the best interests of the said Watkins, 
and the public generally, require his release." 

The warden has quite recently asked that I grant the application. The pardon 
is granted. J. D. W. 

90. Harry Oliver, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 12th day of June, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned November 19, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. The 
indictment charged that the defendant, on the 17th day of May, 1877, did unlaw- 
fully and feloniously steal, take and carry away eight hundred pounds of lead, of 
the value of ten dollars, eight hundred pounds of solder, of the value of ten dol- 
lars, and eight hundred pounds of a metal composed of a mixture of lead and 
solder, of the value of ten dollars, of the personal goods and chattels of Thomas 
D. Kingan, John M. Sinclair and Kobert Sinclair. Application for his pardon 
was made June 5, 1878. The petition is signed by the judge and prosecuting 
attorney, six jurors and other citizens of Marion county. In it they show that the 
prisoner was but eighteen years of age; "that he was chiefly convicted on the evi- 
dence of one William Branman, who claimed and testified that he purchased the 
property from said Oliver and paid him therefor, which fact was admitted by said 
Oliver, who claimed and testified upon the trial that said William Branman had 
hired him to go and get said property and bring it to him, said William Branman, 
which he did, and received for said labor one dollar from said Branman ; " that his 



103 

parents are ©Id and very poor and need his assistance; that this was his first offense; 
that his character before had been good, and that he is a sober, steady and indus- 
trious boy; that in view of the fact that there is some doubt as to his guilt, or the 
criminal intent, and from his tender age and his future good to himself and society? 
that he is a fit and proper subject for executive clemency. I fixed upon the expi- 
ration of eighteen months from the date of the arrest as a proper time for favor- 
able action upon the application. The warden reports that the prisoner's conduct 
has been good. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

91. Carson Emokt, who was convicted in the St. Joseph Circuit Court of the 
crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 31st day of May, 1877, to be im- 
prisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned November 22, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. This 
application was commenced June 4, 1878, by a petition of the judge and clerk of 
the circuit court, the sheriff, treasurer, auditor and recorder and other citizens of 
Elkhart county. They show that the defendant was convicted under this as an 
assumed name ; that he was not seventeen years of age when he committed the 
crime for which he is now imprisoned ; that the crime for which he was commit- 
ted was his first offense against the laws of the State ; that he was not a vicious boy 
and, it appears, was on this occasion led away from his home in Goshen by a boy 
who had made his escape from the Reform School, and with whom he was induced 
to start west on a tramp ; that near twenty miles from home, and within the limits 
of St. Joseph county, they stopped at a farm house to procure food for themselves 
and, finding no one on the premises, entered and got to eat what they wished and 
carried away with them clothing of some slight value ; that they were arrested, 
and on trial at South Bend, concealing their true residence and names, were taken 
to belong to the numerous army of tramps then infesting the country, and sen- 
tenced to State's prison for a term of two years from date; that the prisoner has been 
a good and faithful boy, and gives promise of thorough amendment for the future J 
that his mother is a hard-working, good and honest washerwoman and greatly 
needs his help. The prosecutiag attorney certifies that the character of the crime 
is substantially set forth in the petition. The judge who tried the case, has at the 
request of the friends of the prisoner, written me fully. He says that the other 
defendant was tried by an intelligent jury, and, as they fixed his punishment at two 
years, he could not discriminate in favor of the prisoner upon his plea of guilty, 
and at the same time show proper respect to the judgment of the jury. In con- 
clusion, he says : 

" I thought both boys were very young to go to prison. The property stolen 
was of little value and I know of no circumstances of aggravation in the com- 
mission of the offense. If under such circumstances, you think the case one proper 
for the exercise of clemency, I should harmonize with your views. I have, how- 
ever, adopted the rule not to impose upon the governor my views until asked by 
him so to do." 

The prisoner has served nearly eighteen months and the warden reports that his 
conduct has been good. The act modifying the offense of larceny, approved 
March 3, 1877, was not in force until after the prisoner's conviction. The pardon 
is granted. J, D. "W. 

92. Caesar Graves, who was convicted, in the Monroe Circuit Court, of the 
crime of robbery, and sentenced, on the 6th day of June, 1877, to be imprisoned 



104 

for the term of two years. Pardoned November 27, 1878, and released from con- 
finement in the State Prison South. Decision: By the Governor. This application 
was commenced August 12, 1878. Citizens of Monroe county, mostly residing in 
Harrodsburg and vicinity, and recommended by the clerk of the court as worthy 
and honorable citizens, represented by petition that the defendant's crime was the 
taking of a watch alleged to be of the value of ten dollars ; that he is now about 
twenty-two years old; that his father died when he was about ten years of age, 
and that for several years he had but little, if any, parental restraint, advice or 
care given him; that, in their opinion, he was not guilty of the crime charged, but 
that his conviction was brought about by a conspiracy of other parties to protect 
themselves ; that all the witnesses who testified against him have fled the country, 
but one, and he has brought suit for six hundred dollars against a number of citi- 
zens of Harrodsburg for services as a detective in procuring the arrest and con- 
viction of Graves; that, since the defendant's conviction, the person from whom it 
was alleged the watch was taken, on a highway, in broad daylight, has also fled 
the country for fear of prosecution ; that some of the witnesses who testified against 
Graves were indicted, and that no witness who so testified would now be believed 
by any good citizen in the neighborhood. In conclusion, they say: 

" Prom all the facts and cireumstances developed since the trial, we are of the 
decided opinion that the said Graves was wrongfully accused and convicted, and, 
if guilty at all, was the result of a conspiracy against him. We, therefore, most 
respectfully but earnestly recommend the interposition of executive clemency in 
his behalf, and ask that he be pardoned out of the State's Prison, having already 
served out one-half the term for which he was sentenced." 

Ten jurors joined in a petition for pardon. The Prosecuting Attorney and 
other members of the bar made a like petition. I requested the opinion of the 
judge of the court. He replied: 

"After inquiry into the matter of the conviction of Cassar Graves, and in view 
of the punishment he has already suffered, 1 feel constrained to join in the recom- 
mendation now before his Excellency, the Governor, for a pardon." 

Kecently the sheriff, treasurer, recorder and auditor have adde_d their petition. 
The prisoner has served nearly eighteen months. The warden reports that his 
conduct has been very good, and that he is regarded as an exceptionally good 
prisoner: The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

93. Gilbert A. Crosley, who was convicted in the Benton Circuit Court of 
the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 17th day of April, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned December 18, 1878, and released 
from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision : By the Governor. This 
application was made December 1, 1877, by the prisoner's mother. In her petition 
she showed that her son was convicted upon his plea of guilty to the charge of 
stealing a horse; that she is a widow, depending solely on him for her care and 
support; that the offense charged is the only one of which he was ever guilty, and 
that was committed at a time while he was under the influence of liquor; that he 
is very sorry for the wrong and crime committed, and, if pardoned, she feels confi- 
dent that he will be a good citizen and support her in her old age. The judge, 
prosecuting attorney and county officers of Benton county added their testimony 
to the correctness of her statements, and joined with her in asking that clemency 
be extended to the prisoner. I was disposed to grant a pardon at the expiration of 



105 

■©ne year of his term, but his conduct was unfavorable. He has now served twenty 
months. The warden reports that his conduct since April 17, 1878, has been good. 
The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

94. Alexander Webster, who was convicted in the Vanderburg Criminal 
Circuit Court of the crime of assault and battery with intent to murder, and sen- 
tenced, on the 8th day of August, 1873, to be imprisoned for the term of seven 
years. Pardoned December 20, 1878, and released from confinement in the State 
Prison South. Decision : By the Governor. This application was received April 24, 
1878. The petition is signed by the presiding judge, the prosecuting attorney of 
the court at the time, and the deputy prosecuting attorney who conducted the 
prosecution, the county officers and their deputies; the petit jurors, except one who 
died some three years ago, and one who removed from the county and can not be 
found; five of the grand jurors, three having died, and the rest not having been 
seen; the judge of the circuit court, and the judge of the superior court of the 
county ; the present prosecuting attorney and other members of the bar, and prom- 
inent and respectable citizens of the county. It recites the facts of the crime and 
conviction. The statement of evidence by the deputy prosecuting attorney is as 
follows : 

"I was the deputy prosecuting attorney for Vanderburg county, in the year 
1873, and conducted the prosecution of this case. My minutes of the testimony 
have been mislaid, lost, or destroyed. My recollection of the testimony is, however, 
quite distinct. Webster was convicted of assault and battery upon one Jordan 
Fields with intent to murder. The State proved that, on the morning of July 24, 
1873, between 11 a. m. and 12 a. m. (sic) Webster stood leaning against a lamp- 
post, on the corner of Fourth and Main streets, in Evansville. Fields came along 
the sidewalk on Fourth street, carrying in his two hands a cane. This cane was 
shown subsequently to have had a dagger in it. With this cane held in front of 
him, in the attitude in which he might draw this dagger, Fields walked straight 
towards Webster. When he was within a few feet of Webster, Webster drew a 
pistol and shot Fields, the ball striking him in the right breast and passing through 
the upper portion of the right lobe of the lungs. Fields fell, and Webster put up 
his pistol, and, without making any attempt to escape, gave himself up. For the 
defense it was shown that, at a colored ball, the night before, the parties had a 
bitter quarrel, ending in a fight. In this quarrel and fight Fields was the aggres- 
sor, and was entirely in the wrong, as Webster, apparently, attempted to avoid 
both the quarrel and fight. Fields, who, from the whole testimony in the case, was 
evidently quite a dangerous man, then threatened, in Webster's hearing, that he 
(Fields) would kill Webster on the first opportunity. He made the same threat to 
the girl who was the original cause of the quarrel and fight, the next morning, and 
the girl at once informed Webster. Soon after this was done, the meeting and 
shooting took place. Webster's good character for peaceableness was proven by 
several witnesses. This was all the evidence in the case. Webster seemed to be 
laboring on a, perhaps, well-grounded fear that Fields" would kill him, and he 
seemed to be earnestly of the opinion that, under these circumstances, he had the 
right to kill Fields, and that the shooting of Fields, under the circumstances, was 
necessary to save his own life." 

This statement of facts has been substantially incorporated in the petition. A 
letter from Fields to Webster, dated Evansville, January 20, 1876, reads as follows: 

"Friend Webster: I take the present opportunity of writing you a few 
lines to let you know that I have not forgot you. I will try to do something for 



106 

you as soon as I get some money ; but times is pretty hard now. If I can not get 
you out, I will have you a fine suit of clothes made by the time your time is out 
and send them up to you, if I live. Webster, they are but few men that will do 
more for you than I^will, though you know that you are there to-day for trying to 
[take] my life, which you could not give. But this was not your fault. It 
was my own, and Alice Smedley was the cause of it, although you did not know it. 
I believe, though, if you had not of shot me as soon as you did, I should of shot 
yon, and perhaps I might of went to the gallows for it instead of seven years to 
prison ; but, as it was all my fault, I will do all I can to get you out of there." 

The Governor of Tennessee|has written me that the prisoner's friends are respect- 
able people and in their behalf has asked me to consider this application for his 
pardon. I decided, May 28, 1878, that I wculd shorten his term one year. The 
deputy warden shows *that by good conduct he has gained so much time that his 
term will expireJSeptember 6, 1879. The warden to-day reports that his conduct 
has been good. The pardon is granted. J. D. W. 

95. Prank Lee, who was convicted in the Miami Circuit Court of the crime of 
petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 18th day of February, 1878, to be imprisoned 
for the term of one year. Pardoned December 21, 1878, and released from confine- 
ment in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Governor. This application was- 
made August 23, 1878, after one-half the term had been served. 

The judge wrote me under date of August 20: 

" I am asked to invite your clemency in the case of Frank Lee, sentenced to the 
State's Prison North by judgment of the Miami Circuit Court. The plea was 
guilty. My recollection is not quite distinct. He was indicted for stealing a coat 
from the Broadway House, Peru, which was afterward recovered at a pawn-shop 
or saloon in Indianapolis. On first pleading guilty, it was with the qualification 
that he had no memory of the facts. ' I refused to receive this plea, but referred 
him to his counsel for further advice. Afterwards, he pleaded guilty again, but 
with the like qualification. I again refused to accept the plea, preferring to con- 
sider it a plea of not guilty, and asked him to get ready for trial on the plea of 
not guilty. He then pleaded guilty, absolutely. On hearing the proof, by wit- 
nesses on this plea, it was shown that he had been on a several days' drunk, with 
little knowledge of his condition. The technical larceny was established. But 
there was no show of its being a practice or familiar, but much to the contrary. 
It was a clear case of stealing on a drunk. But I followed, as required to do, the 
decision of the Supreme Court in State v. O'Herria, whieh refuses to soften crime, 
on account of drunkenness. I was so much impressed with the case, that I said to 
Lee, on sentencing him, that on proof of good conduct in prison, I would ask you 
to shorten his term of imprisonment. I don't know how he has done, but if well, I 
think him entitled to a favorable consideration. His appearance is very good, and 
he has none of the manners of a cultivated thief." 

The prosecuting attorney, added: 

*-I have read the foregoing statement of Judge Pettit, and fully concur in the 
statements therein made." 

I deferred action upon the case, as thus made, until this time. The warden re- 
ports that his conduct has been good. He has probably already gained ten days, 
having served ten months. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 



107 

96. Clarence P. Shxngleton, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Cir- 
cuit Court of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced on the 10th day of March, 
1877, to he imprisoned for the term of two years. Pardoned Decemher 30, 1878, 
and released from confinement in the State Prison North. Decision: By the Gov- 
ernor. This application was received .November 14, 1878, when the prisoner had 
served twenty months. The defendant was indicted March 9 for a crime commit- 
ted March 6, and, without asking the appointment of counsel, entered a plea of 
guilty and was sentenced March 10. Since his conviction he has disclosed the cir- 
cumstances of the offense, and in his petition under oath has made me a full and 
particular statement of the facts. He says he was driving a team to earn a support 
for himself and his widowed mother; that, failing to get work, and they being in 
want, he was persuaded hy one Brown to steal and deliver to him a horse belong- 
ing to William P. Christian, and for that service received fifty dollars; that he did 
not disclose the part taken by Brown for fear that by so doing he would be prose- 
cuted more severely and receive greater punishment; that he had before borne a 
good character, and was industrious, hard-working and honest. The judge says- 
he knows nothing of the facts of the case, but that if they are true as stated by the 
prisoner he ought to be pardoned. Several county officers, the officer who made 
the arrest, the deputy prosecuting attorney, who is now prosecuting attorney, and 
some other citizens have added their names to the petition. The prisoner has but 
seventy days of his two years' term remaining, and his conduct is reported good, 
which would reduoe it to but a little over one month. The pardon is granted. 

J. D. W. 



COMMUTATIONS. 



SERIES OF 1877. 



1. George E. King. 3. Charles Roche. 

2. Eichard Greer. 4. Oliver P. M. Rudolph. 



1. George E. King, who was convicted in the Huntington Circuit Court of 
the crime of having counterfeit money with intent to put the same in circulation, 
and sentenced, on the 19th day of March, 1875, to be imprisoned for the term of 
five years. Sentence commuted January 6, 1877, by substituting therefor his 
imprisonment in the State Prison North for the term of two years. Decision: By 
the Governor. The following statement is made by Judge Slack: 

"Huntington, Ind., December 15, 1876. 
Governor T. A. Hendricks: 

An application is about to be made for the pardon of George E. King, who was 
convicted at the March term of the Huntington Circuit Court, 1875, for having in 
his possession counterfeit bank notes, with intent to put the same in circulation, 
under the thirty-fourth section of the statute denning felonies. He was tried by a 
jury, and sentenced to the State prison for the period of five years. I thought at 
the time his sentence was a very severe one when all the circumstances are taken 
into consideration. When convicted he was only twenty or twenty-one years of 
age, very delicate constitution, and looked then more like going to the grave than 
to the penitentiary — evidently a good subject for consumption. In March next he 
will have been in the State prison two years, and I feel that he has sufficiently 
paid the penalty of his wrong-doing, and would respectfully ask that he be par- 
doned. I have the honor to be, 

Very respectfully, yours, 

Jas. R. Slack, 
Judge Twenty-eighth Judicial Circuit." 

The prosecuting attorney also recommends his pardon. All the county officers 
ask his pardon upon the grounds that he is sufficiently punished. The warden 
of the prison makes the following report in the case : 



109 

"State Prison North, December 23, 1876. 

To Governor Thomas A. Hendricks, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Dear Sir : The conduct of George E. King, the within named convict, has 
been unexceptionable during his confinement in this prison. In my opinion he is 
a worthy subject of executive clemency. 

Chas. Mayne, Warden." 

I do not think a pardon should now be granted; but the punishment is too severe.. 
For such offense two years is the usual punishment. The sentence is commuted 
from five years' confinement to two years. T. A. H. 

2. Eichard Greer, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of assault and battery with intent to commit a rape, and sentenced, 
on the 6th day of January, 1877, to be imprisoned for the term of two years. 
Sentence commuted January 8, 1877, by substituting therefor his confinement in 
the jail of Marion county until February 25, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. 
Charged with assault and battery with intent to commit a rape; on the 25th day of 
February, 1875, the prisoner was sentenced upon a verdict to two years imprison- 
ment; his case was reversed by the Supreme Court; convicted again and again 
reversed. He has now pleaded guilty and been sentenced to two years. The fol- 
lowing statements are made by Messrs. Cropsey and Burns and Duncan, who pros- 
ecuted the case, and by Judge Jordan, who tried the case : 

"On the 9th day of February, 1875, the grand jury of Marion county, Indiana, 
returned an indictment against one Eichard J. Greer, charging him with having 

attempted to commit a rape upon one a girl of the age of years. 

That, on the 25th day of February, 1875, said Greer was tried by a jury and fined 
one dollar and sentenced to the penitentiary for a term of two years. Greer's 
counsel appealed said cause to the Supreme Court of this State. The Supreme 
Court, on the 25th day of September, 1875, reversed said cause, and ordered Greer 
to be re-tried. Afterward, on the 22d day of October, 1875, Greer was again tried 
in the Marion Criminal Court by a jury, and fined one dollar and sentenced to serve 
a term of three years in the penitentiary. Greer's counsel again appealed said cause 
to the Supreme Court, when, on the 16th day of December, 1876, it was again re- 
versed and cause remanded to Marion Criminal Court. Greer, the defendant, has, 
since his first arrest, been imprisoned either in the penitentiary or in the Marion 
county jail for a period of two years, less one month, as lona: a punishment as the 
jury trying him the first time saw fit by their verdict to have him suffer for his sin. 
The reputation of the prosecuting witness for truth and veracity, and for virtue and 
chastity was impeached. As the attorneys who prosecuted Greer each trial in the 
Marion Criminal Court, and knowing the above facts to be true, and fully believing 
that Greer has suffered sufficiently for his crime, we most earnestly ask that you do 
grant him a pardon. James M. Cropsey, 

H. Burns." 

" I assisted in the prosecution of Eichard Greer on the second trial of his case 
in the criminal court of this county. From what I know of the facts in the case, 
I can freely say that even admitting his guilt (which, however, is by no means 
certain) I think he has already been sufficiently punished. He has been in prison 
nearly, if not quite, two years. Yours, with respect, 

John S. Duncan." 



110 

" I presided at the first trial of Richard Greer, when lie was sentenced for two 
years. He has served already two years, and I think he has been punished suffi- 
ciently. The case was not a strong one against him. 

Yours, Lewis Jordan." 

On the 25th day of February next, he will have been in prison two years — the 
period fixed by the jury on the first trial. That punishment is probably sufficient. 
The jury found it sufficient. As he will then have borne a punishment equal to 
the verdict, I think it proper to commute the punishment to confinement in the 
■county jail until the 25th day of February, 1877. So commuted. 

T. A. H. 

3. Charles Roche, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of embezzlement, and sentenced, on the 2d day of April, 1877, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Sentence commuted April 13, 1877, by sub- 
stituting for his confinement in the State Prison North, his commitment to the 
House of Refuge for Juvenile Offenders. Decision : By the Governor. The applica- 
tion is by the father of the defendant, and shows that the conviction was on a plea 
of guilty; that the young man was nineteen years of age on the 6th day of the 
present month ; that before the commission of the crime, his reputation for hon- 
esty had been good ; that he had never before been charged with or suspected of 
crime, and that his association for two years with hardened criminals in the prison, 
might permanently injure him. A commutation of the punishment is urged. The 
judge, prosecuting attorney and clerk of the court, the auditor and sheriff of the 
county, and a large number of prominent and substantial business firms and citi- 
zens of Indianapolis, familiar with the facts and circumstances of the crime, join in 
the prayer of the petition. I have caused the case to be carefully examined by 
Mr. O'Brien, superintendent of the House of Eefuge, and have received from him a 
written report in which he recommends that I commute the sentence. Adopting 
these numerous recommendations in support of my own judgment, I will grant the 
application. J. D. W. 

4. Oliver P. M. Rudolph, who was convicted, in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court, of the crimes of burglary and grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 2d day 
of October, 1877, to be imprisoned for the term of seven years. Sentence commu- 
ted October 13, 1877, by substituting for his imprisonment in the State Prison 
North his commitment to the House of Refuge for Juvenile Offenders. Decision : 
By the Governor. The defendant is less than sixteen years of age. The application 
is made by counsel representing his mother, and is supported by the recommenda- 
tion of the county officers and other respectable citizens of Marion county. I 
have referred the case to the superintendent of the institution for investigation. 
He has made me a full report, and recommends that the sentence be commuted, 
pledging himself to put forth every effort for the boy's complete reformation. A 
commutation will issue, subject to revocation if the recipient do not conduct him- 
self ■well and show himself to be worthy of this act of clemency. J. D. W. 



Ill 



SERIES OF 1878. 



1. Lewis Veatch. 

2. Michael Gillooly. 

3. William Eakers. 



4. "William Q. Greenley. 

5. Harry Prunk. 

6. Arthur C. Boswell. 



1. Lewis Veach, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court of 
the crime of manslaughter, and sentenced on the 4th day of January, 1878, to be 
imprisoned in the State Prison for the term of fifteen years. Sentence commuted 
by substituting for his confinement in the State Prison North his imprisonment in 
the State Prison South for said term. Commutation granted January 12, 1878. 
Decision: By the Governor. The application is made by the convict. It is sup- 
ported by the recommendation of Charles H. Test, who as special judge, presided 
at the trial, the Prosecuting Attorney and the clerk of the court that it be granted. 
A respectable physician of Indianapolis says the convict has chronic rheumatism, 
and that the milder climate in the southern part of the State would be more con- 
ducive to his health and happiness. This conviction is the result of a new trial 
granted by the Supreme Court. "Under the former conviction the prisoner was 
in confinement at Michigan City. Following the precedent in the case of Louis 
Linn (series of 1873-4, No. 21), the commutation is granted. J, D. W. 

2. Michael Gillooly, who was convicted in the Howard Circuit Court, of 
the crime of murder, and sentenced, on the 2d day of November, 1877, to suffer 
death. Sentence commuted January 25, 1878, by substituting for the death penalty 
his imprisonment in the State Prison during life. Decision: By the Governor. I 
have examined this application with much care, and am not satisfied that the sen- 
tence pronounced should be executed. The circumstances of the case brought to 
my knowledge convince me that the defendant has not received the benefit on his 
trial of all the elements of the offense that might extenuate his crime. Homi- 
cides worthy of death are no doubt often committed; but, sitting as a juror, hav- 
ing the facts before me as they are presented in this case, and bound to know and 
determine the existing law of our State, I could not consent to the verdict as re- 
turned against the defendant. An appeal from the judgment having recently been 
disposed of by the Supreme Court, I have been aided in my investigation by the 
record, briefs and opinion of the court. 

The defendant was indicted October 2, 1877. The indictment is in two counts. 
The first charges "that one Michael Gillooly, late of said county, on the 22d day 
of August, a. D. 1877, at said county and State, did, then and there, unlawfully, 
feloniously, purposely, and with premeditated malice, kill and murder one Thomas 
Lannon, by, then and there, unlawfully, feloniously, purposely, and with premedi- 
tated malice, shooting at and against and into the body of said Thomas Lannon, 
with a certain firearm commonly called a revolver, which said firearm was then 



112 

and there loaded with gunpowder and leaden bullets, and which said firearm he, 
the said Michael Gillooly, then and there had and held in his hand, contrary," etc. 
The second count charges the time, place and persons, and the killing, as in the- 
first, and contains the words "and mortally wounding said Thomas Lannon with a . 
certain firearm, which he, the said Michael Gillooly, then and there, had and held 
in his hand, said firearm being then and there loaded with cartridges containing 
powder and ball, contrary," etc. On October 8, the accused appeared in court and r 
it being shown that he was a poor person and unable to procure counsel to defend 
the indictment, counsel was assigned him. Appearing by counsel, October 13, he 
moved unsuccessfully to quash the indictment, and entered a plea of not guilty. 
No application for a change of venue from Howard county was made, although 
the community was much excited. On October 15, 1877, the issue was submitted to 
a jury for trial. It is claimed that the jurors were not all unprejudiced. The 
trial resulted, October 18, in a verdict of "guilty as charged in the first count of 
the indictment, of murder in the first degree," and the penalty, death. The jury 
spent twenty-one hours in deliberation. A motion for a new trial having been 
overruled, judgment was entered. A bill of exceptions was filed November 15. 
The transcript was filed in the supreme court, December 13, 1877. Appellant's 
brief was filed December 17th, that of the State December 31st. The opinion of 
the court affirming the judgment was filed January 8th instant. Of the four assign- 
ments of error, the prisoner's counsel pressed but one, namely, the overruling of 
his motion for a new trial. Among the reasons for a new trial is one which the 
court has disposed of briefly as follows: 

"The next cause assigned for a new trial, was the refusal of the court to permit 
the defendant to prove, on the trial, that the deceased, Thomas Lannon, had made 
threats against the defendant, and used insulting and abusive language towards him r 
and treated him disrespectfully, and had challenged him to a fight, which defend- 
ant refused to accept, and had made threats of personal violence which had been 
communicated to defendant. It was sufficient reason for refusing to admit the 
offered testimony that no time was stated when the offensive conduct occurred. 
See BickneU's Cr. Pr., 273 et seq." A reference to the verbatim report of the evi- 
dence incorporated in the bill of exceptions discloses many questions by the State 
and answers by her witnesses directed to supposed threats made by the accused 
before the killing. It appears that the deceased was, for a time last summer, a 
police officer in the city of Kokomo, assigned to duty in the fourth ward during 
the latter part of the day and a portion of the night. One night, during the sum- 
mer, the defendant was arrested by the deceased in a disreputable house. On his 
way to the jail, a fellow officer recommended the prisoner's release, saying he 
believed in serving all men alike. Gillooly is credited with the remark : " I will 
go down, but there will be a hereafter." 

" Question. — "Who was he talking to ? 

"Answer. — He spoke to Mr. Lannon then." 

Next morning, on his way to the mayor's court, he complained of the partiality 
shown in his arrest "Witnesses testified that on several occasions he expressed an 
intention to have satisfaction out of Lannon. It is said that after the arrest, he 
was often intoxicated, declared that his reputation had been ruined, that he would 
shoot himself if he had not a mother to take care of, and threatened to kill the 
deceased. The killing of the deceased was proven. Defendant's counsel have 
undertaken to show, in his behalf, the circumstances which preceded the arrest and 
the occasion thereof. In the testimony as reported, occurs the following : 



113 

" Thomas Gillen, called on behalf of the defendant, testified as follows : * * * 

Question. — You made some statements yesterday about some threats having been 
made by Mr. Gillooly against Lannon. State what you know, if anything, of Lan- 
non, on any occasion, using insulting language or making threats toward Gillooly." 

To which the State objected, and the objection was sustained, and defendant ex- 
cepted. The same question is then put in this form : 

" Question. — State what knowledge you have, if any, of Mr. Lannon making 
any threats against Mr. Gillooly, at any time previous to this occurrence, or treat- 
ing him partially or disrespectfully ?" 

To which the State objected, and the objection is sustained, and the defendant at 
the time excepted. 

Court. — " There is no self-defense in this case." 

O'Brien. — " We claim it to show the intent — to show that there was no intent to 
commit murdec in the first degree." 

********** 

Miss Millikan, called on behalf of the defendant, testified as follows : 

" Question. — State your name to the jury ? 

Answer. — Amanda J. Millikan. 

Question. — Where do you live ? 

Answer. — John E. Johnson's, in Ervin township, nine miles northwest of Ko- 
komo. 

Question. — Where does your father live ? _ 

Answer. — About a fourth of a mile south of there. 

Question. — Do you know Michael Gillooly, the defendant in this case ? 

Answer. — Yes, sir. 

Question: — Did you know Thomas Lannon ? 

Answer. — Yes, I did. 

Question. — Where did you get acquainted with these two men ? 

Answer: — At John E. Johnson's. 

Question. — What were they doing there ? 

Answer. — They were ditching. 

Question. — How long ago ? 

Answer. — It was last February or March. 

Question. — When did they get through, if you know? 

Answer. — On the 9th day of March, if my memory is right. 

Question. — Where did they board when they worked there? 

Answer. — They boarded at Mr. Johnson's. 

Question. — Who was cook ? 

Answer. — Well, sir, I was. 

Question. — Which came first, Mr. Gillooly or Mr. Lannon? 

Answer. — Mr. Gillooly. 

Question. — How much first ? 

Answer. — If I am not mistaken, it was about four days. 

Question. — Did you see or know of any difficulty between them then ? 

Answer. — Yes, I did, one day. 

Question. — How long before Gillooly quit? ' 

Answer. — Just after he quit; about three hours, I expect. 

Question. — When he quit work, where did he come to? 

Answer. — He came to the house and took his paper and sat down to read. 

Question. — When did Lannon come? 

Answer. — At noon. 

Question. — State to the jury what occurred there when LanDon came. 

8 Paedons. 



114 



Answer. — As well as I can remember, Thomas Lannon came and washed his 
hands, and face and came into the kitchen, where I was, and wiped on the towel. 
Michael was sitting in the room reading his paper, as well as I remember. Tom 
said to Mike" — 

Objected to by the State. 

Judge O'Brien, attorney for defendant: " We propose to show the conversation 
and the threat. We propose to show this man had trouble with the deceased, 
and the deceased challenged this man to go out of doors and fight, and that this man 
refused. We offer it for the purpose of mitigating, showing Lannon's insulting 
treatment and threats, with the view of mitigating from the larger to the lower 
offense, that might be punishable under this indictment. We offer to prove 
the same by Thomas O'Donnell, Dennis North, Miss Amanda J. Millikan and 
Thomas Gillen.'' 

The objection is sustained, and the defendant at the time excepted. 

Dennis North, sworn on behalf of the defendant, testified as follows: 

Judge O'Brien: By this witness we propose to prove the same insolent words, 
and that he communicated this threat as coming from Lannon ; that this witness 
communicated the very word as coming from Lannon to this defendant. 

The objection is sustained, and the defendant at the time except(s)." 

Thomas O'Donnell, sworn on behalf of the defendant, testified as follows: 

* * * * « * *- •:•:- # * 

Judge O'Brien. "This is the other witness that we propose to prove the same 
kind of talk by Lannon.'' 

Court. — " You have reserved the question." 

x- * * * » * * * * * 

It thus appears that while the State received every advantage from the doctrines 
of communicated and uncommunicated threats, the defendant is deprived of most 
valuable evidence by a technical defect in his bill. No grounds of objection on 
the part of the State are entered in the bill. The defendant specified what 
he proposed to prove. The time was fixed in March last, when the grievance may 
have occurred. Lannon after that came to Kokomo and became a policeman, and, 
either voluntarily or instigated by others, arrested the prisoner and, as he thought, 
destroyed his previous good reputation in community, and among those whose 
good opinion he cherished. Upon the affirmance of the judgment I was asked by 
petitions of persons acquainted with the prisoner's uniform good character before 
he went to Howard county, to modify the sentence imposed upon him. Many 
other petitions have since been received from citizens of Howard and adjoining 
counties. They indicate public sentiment in that portion of the State unfavorable 
to the execution of the judgment as it now stands. To-day I have been visited by 
a large and respectable delegation, who have no personal interest whatever in the 
prisoner's case, and desire only that exaet justice be done. At my request they 
have placed their recommendations' in writing. They are as follows : 

"State of Indiana, Executive Department, 
Indianapolis, January 25, 1878. 

We, the undersigned, citizens of Howard, Tipton and Hamilton counties, do 
• ortify that we believe that at the time of the trial of Michael Gillooly there was 
.in intense excitement against Gillooly growing out partially by the return of Binns 



115 

from the State prison for a new trial, together with other exciting causes. That 
such excitement rendered the trial of said cause exceedingly dangerous, and 
although we do not helieve but what his prosecution and trial was free from any 
and all taint of corruption, yet we believe the excitement was so intense that it was 
highly improbable that he could have a deliberate trial unimpressed with excite- 
ment. We believe his punishment should be commuted to imprisonment for life. 

Tipton County. — J. W. Eobinson, N. B. Overman, B. M, Eobinson, W. L. Ber- 
ryman, I. A. Webb, Thomas Eaftis, E. A. Overman, John Green, E. W. Wright, 
J. A. Moore, B. T. Miller, W. S. Armstrong. 

Howabd County. — C. Eichmond, Milton Hanson, J. M. Leeds, H. J. Meek, T. 
B. Trueblood." 

" We, the undersigned, having heard the statements of many good and reputa- 
ble citizens of Howard county, believe that a radical change has taken place in that 
county since the sentence of Michael Gillooly, and from the fact that such change 
of sentiment has obtained that the trial was conducted amid too much excitement 
to secure at least a sentence of punishment sufficient under the circumstances, and 
that if undue excitement had not prevailed, the death penalty would not have 
been pronounced in his case, and we believe his punishment should be commuted 
to imprisonment for life. 

Thomas J. Kane, 

Samuel Trittipo, 

D. Moss, 

I. E. Gray, 

A. E. Tucker, 

H. H. Stout, (Cicero,) 

J. H. Kenyon, 

W.N.Evans, 

W. S, Armstrong." 

I can not question the purity of the motives which have prompted these recom- 
mendations, nor attribute the opinion of the case expressed therein to an undue 
sympathy for the prisoner and his mother who now await my decision. Our bill 
of rights guarantees to the prisoner " the right to a public trial by an impartial 
jury, in the county in which the offence shall have been committed, to be heard by 
himself and counsel," etc. It declares that " the penal code shall be founded on 
the principles of reformation, and not of vindictive justice." The penal code en- 
acts that " any person convicted of treason, or murder in the first degree, may, 
instead of being sentenced to death, in the discretion of the jury, be imprisoned in 
the state prison during life." It has been decided by our supreme court that it is 
competent for the legislature to confer upon the jury the right to determine in each 
particular case whether capital punishment or imprisonment for life shall be in- 
flicted for the crime of murder. Eice v. The State, 7 Indiana, 332. In this case, 
the discretion was exercised, but it was after protracted deliberation and upon an 
imperfect knowledge of the faets ; for it must be presumed that the minds of the 
jury were familiar with the law applicable to the excluded evidence. Holler v # 
The State, 37 Indiana, 57. A reasonable doubt as to the propriety of enforcing 
the death penalty instead of imprisonment for life might have arisen upon a full 
understanding of the facts offered to the jury. The prisoner is not at fault for the 
exclusion of any. He is still entitled to the benefit of that doubt. The commuta- 
tion is granted. ' J. D, "W. 



116 

3. William Eakers, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
of the crime of petit larceny, and sentenced, on the 6th day of March, 1878, to he 
imprisoned in the State Prison North for the term of two years. Sentence com- 
muted March 15, 1878, by substituting for his confinement in the State Prison 
North, his commitment to the House of Eefuge for Juvenile Offenders. Decision : 
By the Governor. The defendant was sixteen years old in January last. His co- 
defendent, being less than sixteen years of age, has been sent to the House of 
Refuge. This application is made by the boy, and is supported by the recommen- 
dation of the judge. I have caused the case to be examined by the superintendent. 
He recommends a commutation. It is granted. J. D. W. 

4. William Q. Greenley, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit 
Court of the crime of murder, and sentenced to suffer death. Sentence commuted 
May 15, 1878, by substituting for the death penalty, his imprisonment in the State 
Prison during life. Decision: By the Governor. The final disposition of the de- 
fendant's appeal to the supreme court was made by an opinion affirming the 
judgment announced on Tuesday, May 7. The tenth instant was fixed by the 
judgment of the court, for the execution ©f the penalty upon the condemned pris- 
oner. This application was presented to me by a large number of citizens of In- 
dianapolis and Marion county, on the ninth. For want of time t© give it proper 
consideration and to obtain if possible the sentiment of community, I granted a 
respite of the execution for one week. Additional petitions signed by a large 
number of persons in Marion county and in other counties, have been received in 
support of the application. Many persons whose opinions are entitled to respect 
have called upon me in behalf of the prisoner, and have recommended that I 
commute his sentence. The community is divided in sentiment. While by far 
the larger number of those who have called favor a commutation, some persons 
have strongly urged that the judgment should be executed. After a careful hearing 
of all that has been laid before me, and due consideration of the petitions re- 
ceived, 1 conclude that the clemency sought for the prisoner may properly be 
extended to him. The commutation is granted. J. D. W. 

5. Harry Prune, who was convicted, in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court, 
of the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, on the 13th day of May, 1878, to be 
imprisoned for the term of two years. Sentence commuted May 21, 1878, by sub- 
stituting for his confinement in the State Prison North his commitment to the 
House of Refuge for juvenile offenders. Decision : By the Governor. This applica- 
tion is made by the defendant's father, and is supported by the recommendation of 
the judge and prosecuting attorney, and the mayor and chief of police of Indi- 
anapolis. It states that the boy was sixteen years of age on the 17th day of Au- 
gust, 1877. I have eaused the case to be investigated by the superintendent, and 
have received his report, in which he recommends that clemency be extended. The 
commutation is granted. J. D. W. 

6. Arthur C. Boswell, who was convicted, in the Benton Circuit Court, of 
the crime of grand larceny, and sentenced, at the September term, 1878, to be im- 
prisoned for the term of six months. Sentence commuted October 24, 1878, by 
substituting for his imprisonment in the county jail his commitment to the House 
of Refuge for juvenile offenders. Decision: By the Governor. The defendant in 
his application shows that he was seventeen years of age on the 11th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1878; that he is now confined in jail under the sentence evidenced by a 



117 

copy of the judgment, and asks to be committed to the House of Refuge during 
his minority, unless sooner discharged by the commissioners of said institution. 
The judge, prosecuting attorney and clerk of the court, and the sheriff, auditor, 
treasurer and recorder of Benton county, recommend that his application be 
granted. Other persons in whom I have confidence have made a like recommend- 
ation. The superintendent, to whom the case was referred for investigation, re- 
ports that he visited the prisoner at the jail, and found him to be a proper person 
to be received into the institution. The commutation is granted. J. D. W. 



REPRIEVES 



SERIES OF 1877. 



1. To Lewis Armstrong, who was convicted in the St. Joseph Circuit Court 
of the crime of combining to commit a felony, and sentenced on the 8th day of 
June, 1874, to be imprisoned in the Indiana State Prison North for the term of five 
years, a reprieve of his said sentence until he shall have been transported to the 
Dominion of Canada (by virtue of a warrant of extradition) and tried of an indict- 
ment for an assault with intent to commit murder, and acquitted, or eonvicted 
thereof; provided, that, if he be acquitted, he shall immediately return to said 
prison for the service of the residue of his said term. Granted June 8, 1877* 
Decision: By the Governor. The prisoner is charged in Toronto, Canada, with the 
commission of the crime of assault with intent to commit murder, on the 10th day 
of March, 1874. In the treaty entitled "A treaty to settle and define the bound- 
aries between the territories of the United States and the possessions of Her Britan- 
nic Majesty in North America; for the final suppression of the African slave trade; 
and for the giving up of criminals fugitive from justice, in certain cases." "Done 
in duplicate at Washington, the ninth day of August, Anno Domini one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-two," and ratified August 22, 1842, (United States Statutes 
at Large, volume 8, pages 572-577) appears the following: 

" Article 10. — It is agreed that the United States and Her Britannic Majesty 
shall, upon mutual requisitions by them, or their ministers, officers, or authorities 
respectively made, deliver up to justice all persons who being charged with the 
crime of murder, or assault with intent to commit murder, or piracy, or arson, or 
robbery, or forgery, or the utterance of forged paper committed within the juris- 
diction of either, shall seek an asylum, or shall be found within the territories 
of the other : provided, that this shall only be done upon such evidence of criminal- 
ity as, according to the laws of the place where the fugitive or person so charged 
shall be found, would justify his apprehension and commitment for trial if the 
crime or offense had there been committed ; and the respective judges and other 
magistrates of the two governments, shall have power, jurisdiction and authority, 
upon complaint made under oath, to issue a warrant for the apprehension of the 
fugitive or person so charged, that he may be brought before such judges or other 
magistrates respectively, to the end that the evidence of criminality may be heard 
and considered ; and if, on such hearing, the evidence be deemed sufficient to sus- 



119 

tain the charge, it shall be the duty of the examining judge or magistrate, to cer- 
tify the same to the proper executive authority that a warrant may issue for the 
surrender ©f such fugitive. The expense of such apprehension and delivery shall 
be borne and defrayed by the party who makes the requisition and receives the 
fugitive." 

In pursuance of the provisions of section 5270 of the revised statutes of the 
United States, enacted in aid of such treaty, proceedings have been had before the 
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, resulting in a commitment, as follows: 

" The State of Indiana, to the Warden of the 

Indiana State Prison North, Greeting: 

On this 5th day of June, 1877, before the undersigned, etc:, (reciting affidavit, 
warrant and arrest). 

After hearing the evidence presented by the said John "Wilson Murray, the 
court finds: That the prisoner, Lewis Armstrong, now before the court, is the 
person mentioned in said affidavit ; that he is now held by the warden of the State 
Prison North by virtue of a judgment of the St. Joseph Circuit Court, upon his 
conviction of the crime of combining to commit a felony, wherein he was sentenced, 
on the 8th day of June, 1874, to be imprisoned for the term of five years ; and that 
the evidence is sufficient to sustain the charge in said complaint made. 

It is therefore considered and ordered by the court that the said Lewis Arm- 
strong, now before the court, be recommitted to the custody of the warden of the 
Indiana State Prison North, and be by him held in custody to await his arrest 
upon a warrant of the United States of America upon demand of her Majesty, the 
Queen of Great Britain ; and that, upon the service of such process, and his arrest 
thereon, he be delivered to John Wilson Murray, the person appointed by her 
Majesty's Governor-General to receive him. Provided, the term of his said sentence 
under the judgment of the St. Joseph Circuit Court shall have expired or the 
force of said judgment shall have been removed by action of the proper authori- 
ties of the State of Indiana. 

It is further ordered that the said John Wilson Murray pay the costs of this 
proceeding. 

Witness the seal of the Supreme Court and my signature," etc. 

A certificate of the Secretary of State of the United States has been received 
and filed before the Chief Justice. It is directed to any justice, etc., and author- 
izes the proceedings for the fugitive's identification, which have been already had. 
I am asked to grant a pardon, that no obstacle may remain to his immediate ex- 
tradition. Three full years of the term have now expired. If the convict should 
conduct himself well, he would be entitled to a discharge in one year and six 
months, under the act of March 11, 1861. As the crime charged to have been com- 
mitted in Canada is of a much higher grade than that for which he is held here, 
and his conviction may, by the death or removal of witnesses, be rendered impos- 
sible at that time, I think our State ought to yield the person of the prisoner for 
the purposes of a trial, with the understanding that, if he be acquitted, he shall be 
returned to her prison to serve the residue of his term. To do this, I will not 
grant an absolute pardon, but will issue a respite of the prisoner's sentence, thus 
removing the force of the judgment and suspending its execution until the pur- 
poses of the extradition proceeding shall have been fully accomplished. 

J. D. W. 



120 



SERIES OF 1878. 



1. William Q. Greenley. | 2. John Kistler. 

1. To William Q. Gkeenley, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Cir- 
cuit Court of the crime of murder, and sentenced to suffer death on Friday, May 
10, 1878, a respite of the execution of his said sentence for seven days, namely* 
until Friday, May 17, 1878. Keprieve granted May 9, 1878. Decision: By the 
Governor. I am asked by a large number of citizens of Marion county t© commute 
the defendant's sentence by substituting for the death penalty his imprisonment in 
the State Prison during life. The decision of the supreme court affirming the 
judgment was announced on Tuesday last. The time for considering this applica- 
tion is quite short, and therefore I will grant the prisoner a respite of seven days. 

J. D. W. 

2. To John Kistlek, who was convicted in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court 
Of the crime of attempting to blackmail, and sentenced on the 20th day of August, 
1878, to be imprisoned in the State Prison North for the term of one year, a respite 
of the execution of his sentence for a period of thirty days. Respite granted 
August 22, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. The defendant, in his sworn peti- 
tion, represents that he is now sixty-six years old, and has a wife of that age who 
is dependent upon him for support ; that he has appealed his cause, and is advised 
that the judgment against him can be reversed; that the supreme court is not now 
in session, and will not be until about the 1st of September, and therefore he can 
not present his cause till that time; that he has a civil suit pending in the superior 
court of Marion county, in which he is an important witness, and is unable to pay 
the expense of taking his deposition ; that he believes if he is present at the trial 
he can recover judgment for several thousand dollars, and he fears that if he is 
not present he will lose said sum of money; that he is satisfied that if a reprieve 
can be granted him for thirty days he can have this cause appealed and decided 
and have his civil action tried. I am advised by the attorney general that I may 
properly suspend the execution of the judgment until the alleged errors therein 
shall have been examined and the cause be finally determined in the courts. The 
respite is granted. J. D. W. 



REMISSIONS 



SERIES OF 1877. 



1. William Sacre. 

2. William I. Morrison and William 

H. H. Johnson. 

3. John F. Ballard. 

4. Thomas Delany and Jno. I. O'Neal. 

5. Cyrus L. Wann. 

6. Eobert Gray. 

7. Calvin Vantrump. 

8. John W. Marshall. 

9. J. A. Dunlap and S. L. Dunlap. 

10. John Hughes. 

11. John A. Koss. 

12. Willis Stallings. 

13. William G. Jamison and others, 

sureties of Henry Grinestaff. 

14. Charles Burchdorff. 

15. Charles J. B. Eatjen. 

16. Harrison Hill. 

17. John W. Hannah. 

18. William Godfrey. 



19. Columbus Houehins and Joseph 

Houchins. 

20. Lincoln Holloway. 

21. Symmes M. Jelley. 

22. Daniel Fox. 

23. Albert Hausfurder. 

24. Albert McDonald. 

25. John B. Weever. 

26. Nancy J. Stone. 

27. John L. Monjar. 

28. James Burk. 

29. Gotlieb Meyor. 

30. Newton Smith. 

31. William N. Bailey. 

32. John Sumner and Willis Bolin. 

33. Alfred N. Towles and Eobert P. 

Towles. 

34. Charles Brownlee. 

35. Joseph A. Douthitt. 

36. Benjamin F. Hays. 



1. To William Sacre the sum of forty dollars, the amount of four fines of 
ten dollars each, assessed against him by the Shelby Circuit Court, at its May 
term, 1876, upon his conviction of four several violations of law in selling liquor to 
a minor. Eemission granted January 4, 1877. Decision : By the Governor. Wil- 
liam Sacre, convicted, in four cases, of violating the liquor law, and fined ten dol- 
lars in each ease. The county officers and the prosecuting attorney recommend 
that the fines be remitted. The fines are remitted. T. A. H. 



* 122 

2 To William I. Morrison and William H. H. Johnson the sum of five 
hundred dollars, being the amount of a judgment rendered against them by the 
Common Pleas Court of Marion county, on the first day of December, 1868, upon 
a forfeited recognizance. Remission granted January 5, 1877. Decision: By ike 
Governor. William Morrison was arrested and brought before Charles Secrest, a 
justice of the peace of Marion county, upon proceedings for surety of the peace, and 
required to appear in the Common Pleas Court to answer the same. After that, 
and before the next term of the court, he met with an accident destroying his eyesj 
from which he has become permanently blind. Johnson was surety upon this recog- 
nizance for five hundred dollars. At the time court met he was at Cincinnati, 
having his eyes treated, hoping to save his sight, and therefore could not attend 
court. He was defaulted and the recognizance forfeited, and subsequently judg- 
ment was taken against him and surety for the five hundred dollars. In view of 
the sad misfortune which prevented his attending court, and has made him' an object 
of sympathy for life, I think it proper to remit the forfeiture and judgment It is 
recommended by the county officers. The forfeiture and judgment remitted. 

T. A. H. 

3. To John F. Ballard the sum of sixty dollars, being the amount of three 
fines of twenty dollars each, assessed against Columbus Ballard by Michael Posz, a 
justice of the peace of Shelby county, on the 21st day of July, 1875, upon his con- 
viction of three several violations of law by selling liquor without license, and for 
the payment of which the said John F. Ballard became replevin bail. Remission 
granted January 5, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. John F. Ballard is replevin 
bail upon three fines of twenty dollars each against Columbus Ballard, before Mr- 
Posz, a justice of Shelby county. The county officers and prosecuting attorney 
recommend that the fines be remitted. I am not satisfied that the fines should be 
remitted as to Columbus; but because of the age of the replevin bail, and because 
his meaas are so limited as to make it distressing for him to pay the fines, I think 
it proper to adopt the recommendation as to him. The three fines are remitted as 
to the bail, John F. Ballard. T. A. H. 

4. To Thomas Delamt and John I. O'Neal, the sum of two hundred dollars, 
being the amount of a forfeiture taken against them, October 11, 1876, of a recog- 
nizance wherein they were bound as sureties for the appearance of one William 
Bosaw to answer a charge of petit larceny before Merit W. Tague, a justice of the 
peace of Switzerland county, which bond has been filed and entered of record in 
the office of the clerk of the Switzerland Circuit Court. Remission granted Jan- 
uary 5, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. On the 10th day of October last, William 
Bosaw was arrested and taken before Merit W. Tague, a justice of the peace of 
Switzerland county, to answer a charge of petit larceny in the stealing of one cot- 
ton shirt of the value of one dollar, one iron cooking pot of the value of fifty 
cents, and two cotton comforts of the value of one dollar and fifty cents each, the 
property of Harvey Schrceder. The hearing of the case was continued until the 
next day, and the defendant was recognized to appear, the applicants, Thomas 
Delany and John I. O'Neal, becoming the sureties on his bond. On the day fixed 
for the examination the defendant failed to appear, and the bond was forfeited. It 
has since been filed in the office of the clerk of the court, and recorded as required 
by law. The clerk, auditor, sheriff and treasurer of the county give it as their 
opinion that the forfeiture should be remitted. The justice who took the bond has 
written me that, in his opinion, substantial justice would be promoted by a remis- 



123 

sion. The clerk certifies that a suit is now pending upon the bond, and, further, 
that the grand jury of the county has been in session since the forfeiture was taken ? 
and the bond and certificate of forfeiture was filed in his office, and that no indict- 
ment was found against said William Bosaw for the offense set out and described 
in said bond. 

The remission is also recommended by respectable citizens of Switzerland county? 
including the prosecuting witness who represents that the sureties are law-abiding 
persons, and are without fault in the defendant's escape. It also appears that the 
sureties made effort to secure the return of the principal, and offered a reward for 
his return. Judge Scott Carter writes that the grand jury investigated the charge 
and failed and refused to find an indictment, and that he has understood that there 
was nothing in it. The applicant, Delany. who has to pay the forfeiture, has met 
with a recent loss in the burning of his business house. I base the remission prin- 
cipally on the ground of a failure by the grand jury to return a bill. "Where a 
defendant has been recognizee! t> the justice of the peace after examination, and 
he has appeared in court to answer an indictment which has been returned against 
him, and the grand jury makes a return of "not found," the defendant is dis- 
charged. I do not think that a failure to make such a formal return in this case 
should operate more seriously against the sureties; and, as the sureties have taken 
proper steps to return their principal, the forfeiture should be remitted. The re- 
mission is granted. T. A. H. 

5. To Cyrus L. Wann the sum of one hundred dollars, being the amount of a 
fine assessed against him by the Marion Criminal Circuit Court on the 15th day of 
December, 1876, upon his conviction of an assault and battery. Eemission granted 
January 6, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The following communication in 
this case has been addressed to me by the judge and prosecuting attorney who 
tried the case and by the county officers : 

" To His Excellency, Thomas A. Hendricks, Governor of the State of Indiana : 

Your petitioners would respectfully represent that on the 15th day of December, 
1876, in the criminal court of Marion county, before James M. Cropsey, acting as 
judge pro tern, of said court by appointment of Edward C. Buskirk, judge thereof, 
one Cyrus L. Wann, in cause No. 8,842, was tried upon a charge of committing an 
assault and battery upon Minnie Wann, his wife, with intent to kill. The said 
Cyrus was acquitted of the intent to kill, but was convicted of the assault and bat- 
tery, and sentenced to serve a term of sixty days in the county jail and to pay a 
fine of one hundred dollars. 

"No physical pain or injury whatever was inflicted upon the said Minnie by the 
assault and battery. 

Cyrus L. Wann is of the age of twenty-two years; has to the time of this offense 
borne an irreproachable character. His mental capacity is perhaps considerably 
below the average, and from the testimony in the cause it may be rightly inferred 
that he is easily susceptible to surrounding influences. A previous and continued 
separation between himself and his wife was no doubt the predisposing cause of 
the act complained of, for which he was convicted; and it seems an act of imbe- 
cility by which the prisoner foolishly designed to intimidate his wife into a reunion 
and reeonciliation with him rather than the result of any vicious or malicious ten- 
dency of mind, or of any design to injure his wife. 

The prisoner has no property whatever, and for about four months preceding 
the date of his offense had been unable to obtain any steady employment. 



124 

The effect of the sentence will be either, first, that he will be obliged to lie in 
jail after the expiration of the sixty days to serve out his fine at the rate of seventy- 
five cents per day, making an aggregate term of more than six months ; or, second, 
that some innocent friend of his will stand good for the fine in order to effect the 
prisoner's discharge, thus casting the punishment where it does not belong. 

It is our opinion that neither the interest of the defendant nor of the State 
requires in this case a longer term of imprisonment than sixty days. His associa- 
tion with certain characters that he is necessarily thrown in contact with in jail is 
deemed to be positively dangerous, and might result finally in untold evil to him, 
and through him to society. 

In view of these considerations and others which are not necessary to be men- 
tioned, we»earnestly recommend to his Excellency, the Governor, and humbly pray 
him to remit the fine of one hundred dollars imposed in the above named case. 
For which we will ever pray, ete. 
Eespectfully, 

C. P. Darnell, Kecorder. 
James M. Cropsey. 

James E. Heller, Prosecuting Attorney. 
John T. Pkesbly, Sheriff Marion County. 
Jackson Landers, Treasurer Marion County. 
Wm. K. Sproule, Auditor Marion County. 
I am not conversant with all the facts set forth above, but concur in the recom- 
mendation of the judge pro tem. and prosecuting attorney, whose statement of the 
facts justify the concurrence. 

Austin H. Brown, Clerk M. C. C. C." 

1 agree with the officers that the imprisonment of sixty days will be sufficient 
punishment, and that it can serve no public purpose to keep the prisoner in jail 
after that expires. It would be a burthen upon the county only, as he has no 
means with which to pay the fine. The punishment is commuted to sixty days' 
imprisonment, and at the expiration of the sixty days a remittitur of the fine of 
one hundred dollars will be issued. T. A. H. 

6. To Kobert Gray, the sum of five hundred dollars, being the amount of a 
judgment rendered against him by the Marion Civil Circuit Court, on the 27th 
day of December, 1876, upon a forfeited recognizance wherein he was bound as a 
surety for the appearance of one James M. Kirkwood to answer to a charge of 
perjury. Remission granted January 6, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. In 
August, 1876, James M. Kirkwood was arrested before a justice of the peace of 
Marion county upon a charge of perjury. He was recognized to court in a bond 
of five hundred dollars, with Robert Gray as his surety. I think the affidavit upon 
which the perjury was assigned was voluntary and that perjury could not be as- 
signed upon it. Judge Howland has expressed the same opinion. Kirkwood failed 
to appear at court, and the bond was forfeited and judgment has been taken 
thereon. Mr. Gray is a man of no property, as I am informed, beyond his house; 
and that the payment of the judgment would deprive him and his family of their 
home. The grand jury examined the case and refused to find a bill. The case 
stands as an improper recognizance upon the question of law and the appearance 
of Kirkwood in court could not have resulted in his conviction ; because, in fact, 
there was no perjury, and consequently no indictment. The clerk, sheriff, auditor, 
treasurer and recorder of Marion county recommend that the recognizance and 
judgment be remitted; also the managers of the Female Reformatory, in the service 



125 

of which institution Mr. Gray is employed as engineer. I think it proper to remit 
the judgment because there was no proper case before the justice for the recogni- 
zance. Recognizance and judgment remitted. T. A. H. 

7. To Calvin Vantrtjmp the sum of fifty dollars, being the amount of a fine 
assessed against him by the Fulton Circuit Court, on the 27th day of October, 1873, 
upon his conviction of a contempt of court. Kemission granted January 8, 1877. 
Decision: By the Governor. Mr.Vantrump was fined by the Fulton Circuit Court 
in the sum of fifty dollars for contempt of court in offering an attorney, who had a 
special employment in the prosecution of a party charged with crime, ten dollars 
and requesting him to make the prosecution easy. Judge Long held that to be in 
contempt of the court. The clerk, auditor, treasurer and sheriff of the county and 
the assistant prosecuting attorney unite in a statement that, at the time Mr.Van- 
trump did not have a full opportunity for presenting the facts, and that, in fact, he 
communicated the message from another person, and the money was sent to the 
attorney upon another matter; that Mr.Vantrump is one of the most excellent citi- 
zens of the county, and that it would be better to remit the fine. Judge Keith, the 
present judge of the court, has called in person upon me to say that he was ac- 
quainted with the case and facts, and that he recommends and desires the fine to 
be remitted. From his statement I am satisfied that Mr.Vantrump intended no 
wrong in the case or trial, nor any attempt to corrupt the prosecution, and that 
Judge Long would now desire that he be relieved from the stigma by a remission 
of the fine. The fine is remitted. T. A. H. 

8. To John W. Marshall, the sum of fifty dollars ($50), being the residue of 
a fine assessed against him, on the 25th day of May, 1876, by the Marion Criminal 
Circuit Court, upon his conviction therein of aiding the escape of inmates of the 
Keformatory Institution for Women and Girls, fifty dollars having been paid on 
the judgment. Kemission granted March 10,1877. Decision: By the Governor : 
The wife of the defendant has presented this application in his behalf, and since it 
was filed, has conferred with me frequently about it. She informs me that she has 
sold a large part of her household goods to procure money to apply upon the fine, 
and has produced and filed with me a receipt of the sheriff for fifty dollars, a part 
of which was borrowed by her. The case is one growing out of the lawless act 
described in the case of John H. Pesenmeyer (See No. 65 of Report for 1875 and 
1876), wherein my predecessor granted a remission of the entire fine after the de- 
fendant had served a term of six months in jail. The clerk, sheriff, treasurer and 
auditor of Marion county give it as their opinion that this fine should be remitted. 
Major J. W. Gordon recommends the remission because of the defendant's pov- 
erty and the distress of his wife and children. The fine seems unnecessarily 
oppressive to the innocent family of the defendant, and now that one-half of it has 
been paid, I think it right that I remit the residue, and it is so ordered. 

J. D. W. 

9. To J. A. Dunlap and S. L. Dunlap the sum of three hundred dollars, 
being the amount of a judgment rendered against them by the Johnson Circuit 
Court, on the 8th day of February, 1876, upon a forfeited recognizance wherein 
they were bound as sureties for the appearance of one John White, to answer a 
charge of forgery pending against him in said court. Remission granted March 
26, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. John White was indicted for forgery in the 
Johnson Circuit Court. The Dunlaps were plasterers at Franklin, and White was 
working for them. Having confidence in him, they became his sureties on his 



126 
l 

recognizance in the sum of three hundred dollars. He failed to attend court, and 
they took out a copy of the bail bond, and delivered it to the sheriff of Noble 
county. The deputy sheriff arrested him on the bail piece, and after the arrest 
negligently allowed him to escape. Had the Duulaps been able to bring him into 
court before judgment was rendered on the recognizance, it wouuld have been a 
good defense against the action by the State upon the forfeiture. Their remedy 
was by delivering to the sheriff a copy of the recognizance. This they did. It was 
all they could do, and it is not right to hold them responsible for the carelessness 
of the sheriffs deputy in allowing him to escape. Had the deputy done his duty, 
White would have been brought to court, and the Dunlaps would have been dis- 
charged from all liability on the bond. Upon these facts I think it right to remit 
the forfeiture and judgment, but as the prosecuting attorney has taken judgment he 
should not be deprived of the commission to which he would be entitled upon col- 
lection of the judgment. Upon the payment to the clerk of the commission, thirty 
dollars, the residue will be remitted. T. A. H. 

July 22, 1876. 

Thirty dollars having been paid as required, a remittitur will issue. 

J. D. W. 

10. To John Hughes the sum of two hundred and twenty dollars, being the 
amount of eleven fines of twenty dollars each, assessed against him by the Hen- 
dricks Circuit Court, on the 1st day of February, 1877, upon his conviction of 
eleven violations of law in selling intoxicating liquors. Eemission granted April 
2, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The defendant has been imprisoned more 
than two months, and is unable to pay any part of his fines. To remain in 
jail more than one year longer would cause the county great expense and his desti- 
tute family much distress. The clerk, auditor, treasurer, sheriff, recorder, county 
superintendent, and many citizens of the county, recommend a remission upon 
assurance from the prisoner that he will not again sell intoxicating liquors. The 
officers of the court have released the costs. The fines will be remitted. 

J. D. W. 

11. To John A. Ross the sum of two hundoed and fifty dollars, being the resi- 
due of a judgment rendered against him by the Hendricks Circuit Court, on the 
30th day of March, 1876, upon a forfeited recognizance wherein he was bound as 
a surety for the appearance of one John Moore to answer a charge of grand 
larceny. Remission granted April 11, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. John Moore 
was brought before a justice of the peace of Hendricks county upon the charge of 
stealing four head of cattle, and required to answer the charge in the Circuit Court. 
John A. Ross became surety upon his recognizance in the sum of five hundred dol- 
lars. An indictment was found, but Moore made default, and judgment has been 
taken against Ross as his surety for five hundred dollars because of the default. 
Ross is the brother of the wife of Moore. Since Moore fled the State, Mr. Ross has 
taken care of and provided for his sister and her three children; otherwise they 
would have become a public charge, as the county officers state. Moore left noth- 
ing out of which the State or Ross can make any part of the judgment. To re- 
quire the payment of the entire judgment would seriously embarrass Ross in his 
business, and probably make it impossible longer to provide for Moore's family, as 
the county officers state. The clerk, auditor, treasurer, sheriff and two of the com- 
missioners of Hendricks county recommend that the judgment be remitted. They 
say that Ross is an honest and upright citizen, and was influenced to become 



127 

Moore's surety by the belief that he was innocent. I do not think the facts justify 
the remittitur of the entire judgment, but that it is proper for me to yield to the 
opinion of the county officers to the extent of one-half thereof. Upon payment 
of two hundred and fifty dollars, the residue of the judgment will be remitted. 
December 12, 1876. T. A. H. 

Two hundred and fifty dollars having been paid, the residue is remitted. 

J. D. W. 

12. To Willis Stallings, the sum of three hundred dollars, being the amount 
of a judgment rendered against him by the Posey Circuit Court, on the 26th day 
of October, 1875, upon a forfeited recognizance wherein he was bound as a surety 
for the appearance of one Francis Dunnigan to answer a charge of assault and 
battery with intent to rape, pending against him in said court. Kemission granted 
April 19, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. Applicant's counsel states the case 
briefly as follows : 

"Dunnigan was charged with the crime, gave bond, became frightened, forfeited 
his bond, as recited in the petition; afterward came back; was tried and found not 
guilty. The evidence simply disclosed the fact that the prosecuting witness had 
been guilty of gross immorality, and, to shield herself, charged Dunnigan with 
crime. The case broke down upon the woman's own testimony." 

The judge, prosecuting attorney and clerk make a statement to the same effect 
with the further fact that the jury returned a verdict of acquital without hearing 
Dunnigan's evidence or leaving their box. The clerk, auditor, treasurer, recorder 
and sheriff of Posey county give it as their opinion that the judgment should be 
remitted, and as the recognizance has served the purpose of the law, it is so or- 
dered. J. D. W. 

18. To William G. Jamison, Jeremiah Davis, Francis M. Robertson, James 
M. Fleenor, Edward C. Jacobs, David B. Peugh, William M. Peugh, Wal- 
ter B. Eodman, George A. Smith, Charles A. McKnight, Andrew Overshi- 
ner and Jonathan Pidgeon, the sum of one thousand dollars, being the residue 
of a judgment for twenty-five hundred dollars rendered against them by the 
Washington Circuit Court, on the 5th day of November, 1875, upon a forfeited rec- 
ognizance wherein they were bound as sureties for the appearance of one Henry 
Grinestaff to answer a charge of murder in the second degree. Remission granted 
May 4, 1877, to take effect as of the date of the judgment. Decision : By the Gov- 
ernor. The applicants, in their petition, show : That on the 3d day of May, 1875, 
one Henry Grinestaff, at the county of Washington, killed John Starr ; that the 
act was committed at the residence of Grinestaff, whither Starr had come armed 
and with the evident intention of killing, or injuring Grinestaff; that the act 
created great excitement in the immediate neighborhood, and fears were enter- 
tained that he would suffer death at the hands of a mob ; that believing himself in 
danger, he for some days evaded process ; that his friends, believing him innocent 
of the .crime charged, advised him to deliver himself to the officers, and gained 
assurances from the friends of the deceased that he should have a fair trial and be 
unmolested if acquitted ; that, acting upon these assurances, he delivered himself 
to the justice of the peace who had issued the warrant for his arrest, waived exam- 
ination and entered into a recognizance for his appearance to answer any indict- 
ment that might be returned into court against him ; that an indictment was re- 
turned against him, charging him in one count with murder and in another with 
manslaughter ; that, on the 18th day of June, 1875, he appeared, and with the 



128 

applicants as his sureties, entered into a recognizance in the sum of twenty-five 
hundred dollars, for his appearance at the day fixed for the trial ; that he failed to 
appear, and judgment was rendered for the amount of the recognizance. It is also 
shown that the sum of two hundred and forty dollars has been made upon execu- 
tion by sale of the property of the principal in the county, leaving $2,260 yet un- 
paid. It is said that the defendant was prepared for his trial and would have 
secured an acquittal, but that he was reliably informed of his danger from mob 
violence, and fled from the State. The sureties also show that they made efforts to 
secure the apprehension and return of their principal and file numerous affidavits 
in support of their statements. It is especially urged by the applicants that they 
have been prevented from performing the condition of the recognizance by a 
power beyond their control, and one which the State herself can not control or 
punish ; that, but for the fear of such mob, Grinestaff could be delivered to the 
authorities of the county, but with the fear of certain death before him, he will 
not surrender himself, and will exercise all his vigilance and energy to elude 
capture. 

The clerk, auditor, sheriff, treasurer, recorder, county superintendent and two 
commissioners have given their opinion in writing that it would be proper for me 
to remit the residue of the judgment, and say: 

"The sureties of Grinestaff, against whom said judgment was rendered, are not 
able without great sacrifice of property, to pay said judgment, and to pay their 
proportionate part will require of some of them all of their property and homes." 

The remission is recommended by citizens of "Washington and Jackson counties 
claiming to be familiar with the facts of the crime and ,the condition of public 
sentiment in the locality. The prosecuting attorney, who took the judgment, says: 

" The petitioners were the neighbors of Mr. Grinestaff, and I am very certain 
they acted in perfect good faith in becoming liable on the recognizance bond. No 
one here thought that Mr. Grinestaff would forfeit his bond. He had answered to 
a previous bond for only $2,000 in the same case. * * * * This matter would 
fall heavily upon these men, if they have it to pay while times are so very hard. 
I am sincere in asking you to make the remission." 

A transcript of the proceedings of the coroner's inquest held upon the body of 
Starr contains the evidence given before the coroner and his jury. It seems to 
support their finding: "That the deceased came to his death by a revolver shot by 
the hands of Henry Grinestaff in self-defense." 

Upon a reference of the case to the attorney general, he reported an opinion as 
follows : 

" The principal point made in the application is that threats of mob violence were 
made in the hearing of Grinestaff which induced him to flee from justice; that he 
had a good defense and intended to abide his trial, his bondsmen supposing bona 
fide that he would do so, but that he was told that if he should be acquitted upon 
his trial he would be hung by a mob, believing which and having just cause to 
believe which, he fled the county. This matter seems to my mind to rest upon 
the following question, — a question of fact to be ascertained by your Excellency 
from the papers — viz: If a mob actually was organized, or was in embryo organi- 
zation, against which Grinestaff had reasonable grounds to apprehend that the offi- 
cers of the law would be powerless to protect him, and if he fled for that reason, 
then I think a remission should be made, for the reason that the State could not in 
justice hold the sureties of Grinestaff to the penalties of the law when powerless in 



129 

the very subject-matter of the penalty to enforce the protection of the law on 
behalf of the accused." After a full consideration of all the facts and recommenda- 
tions presented, I am of opinion that a part of the judgment may properly be re- 
mitted. Upon the payment of such lurther amount as will reduce the residue of 
the judgment to one thousand dollars, the residue unpaid will be remitted. 
March 30, 1877. J. D. W. 

Payment of fifteen hundred dollars and its accrued interest having been made, 
the unpaid residue will be remitted as of the date of the judgment. 

J. D. W. 

14. To Charles Btjrchdorff the sum of twenty-nine dollars and sixty-four 
cents, being the residue of a judgment for fifty dollars rendered against him by 
the Gibson Circuit Court on the 8th day of February, 1876, upon a forfeited recog- 
nizance given for his appearance to answer a charge of selling intoxicating liquor 
in violation of law. Remission granted May 7, 1877. Decision : By the Governor. 
Applicant was charged with three violations of the liquor law of February 27, 
1873, by selling without a permit, and gave a recognizance in the sum of fifty dol- 
lars in each case. He failed to appear, and judgment was rendered upon each 
recognizance. He has paid these judgments and costs, except twenty-nine dollars 
and sixty-four cents. In two cases he was afterward acquitted. In the other he 
was convicted and fined ten dollars, with costs amounting to fifteen dollars. The 
•clerk, sheriff, auditor and treasurer are of opinion that I should remit the unpaid 
residue upon information that the property of both principal and surety subject to 
execution have been exhausted. The remission is granted. 

J. D. W. 

15. To Charles J. B. Ratjen the sum often dollars, being the amount of two 
fines of five dollars each (Nos. 521 and 522) assessed against Fred Block by the 
Dearborn Circuit Court on the 11th day of April, 1871, upon his conviction of sell- 
ing intoxicating liquor to minors, and for the payment of which he became replevin 
bail. Remission granted May 8, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. Five judg- 
ments have been uncollected for more than six years. The principal should have 
been made to pay them, but was not, and in 1874 left for parts unknown. The 
applicant makes oath "that said Block, without the knowledge or consent of said 
affiant, soon after said judgments were rendered against him, left the State, and 
his whereabouts is at this time unknown to affiant; that said affiant has no indem- 
nity or means in his possession to secure him by reason of said security for said 
Block, nor has he any hopes of any future indemnity to save him harmless by 
Teason of said security aforesaid." The clerk, sheriff, auditor and treasurer are of 
opinion that a remission would be proper, because " if said fines are collected they 
will have to be paid by said surety." It is stated in the application signed by the 
judge and several attorneys that the applicant, "as an act of kindness to the said 
Block, and to prevent his commitment to the, county jail, became replevin bail for 
the payment of said fines," and that Block, before leaving, gave him to understand 
that said fines had all been paid, and that he very recently learned that they are 
unpaid. As the surety may have had reason to expect the officers to enforce pay- 
ment from the defendant, he is entitled to at least partial relief. Upon payment 
by him of judgments No. 516, No. 517 and No. 518 I will remit the residue. 

May 8, 1877. J. D. W. 

Three fines having been paid, as required, the residue will be remitted. 

J. D. W, 
9 Pardons. 



130 

16. To Harrison Hill, the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, heing the 
residue of a fine of three hundred dollars assessed against one James H. McCam- 
mack, hy the Putnam Circuit Court, on the 23d day of May, 1876, upon his con- 
viction of an assault and battery, for the payment of which he became replevin 
bail, one hundred and fifty dollars having been paid on the judgment. Eemission 
granted May 15, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. This application is made by 
Robert McCammack. The prosecuting witness, Armant F. Larkin, asks that all 
or a reasonable part of the fine be remitted. Seven jurymen ask a remission. The 
clerk, treasurer, ex-sheriff, sheriff", recorder and auditor recommend that I "remit 
all or a reasonable portion of said fine, the same being excessive." The applicant 
represents ''that Harrison Hill became bail for the defendant by your petitioner 
binding himself to indemnify him against all loss he might sustain thereby ; that 7 
since the entry of said bail, the defendant has fled the oountry, wholly insolvent, 
leaving said bail to pay the fine and all costs, and yoar petitioner bound to him 
for the amount," and upon oath says that he is not indemnified in all or any part 
of the fine or costs. 

The prosecuting attorney has filed a protest against the remission of any part of 
the fine, in which he says that the defendant left soon after his trial, and has not 
been heard of since; that "the father has stated that what money he paid for 
the son on this matter should be deducted from the son's portion of the estate, and 
charged as an advancement." 

A civil suit was brought by the prosecuting witness. One of his counsel in that 
case protests against a remission, saying that the suit was dismissed and compro- 
mised without his advice and consent, and with the understanding that Larkin 
should sign the petition. He says the jury was composed of the best representa- 
tive men in the county, and refers me for further information to one of them by 
name. As that one joins in the recommendation, and as the count}' officers concur 
in the belief that the fine imposed is excessive, 1 am disposed to relieve the surety, 
and, through him, the father, of the excess. Upon proof that one half has been 
paid, I will remit the residue of the judgment. J. D. W. 

May 7, 1877. 

17. To John W. Hannah the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, being the 
residue of a judgment for three hundred dollars rendered against him by the Rush 
Circuit Court, on the 20th day of December, 1876, upon a forfeited recognizance, 
wherein he was bound as a surety for the appearance of one Samuel Powell to 
answer a charge of grand larceny, he having paid one-half of the judgment. Re- 
mission granted May 19, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. It is shown to me by 
the opinion of the clerk, sheriff, auditor, treasurer, and recorder of Rush county 
and by an affidavit of the applicant, that the co-surety is wholly and hopelessly 
insolvent; that the principal was not found, and no judgment was taken against 
him; that the whole of the judgment will fall upon the applicant, who is a man of 
limited means, and will result in compelling him to sell, or heavily encumber, his 
small home, and leave a debt hanging over him for years. The officers ask that at 
least one-half be remitted. The applicant, in his affidavit, says "that affiant has no 
indemnity whatever against said liability in his hands, nor has he any means of 
future indemnification, not even to the extent of a promise to repay the same to 
him; that he knows of no way, shape, form or manner that be could be indemni- 
fied in any part of said judgment." In the absence of any property of the co-surety 
out of which the applicant can enforce payment of the rateable proportion he is 
equkably bound to pay, it seems unjust to require him to pay and lose it. Upon 
his payment of his one-half 1 will remit the residue as to Hannah. 

April 24, 1877. J. D. W. 



131 

18. To William Godfrey the sura of twenty dollars, being the amount of a 
fine assessed against him by the Henry Circuit Court, on the 1st day of May, 1877, 
upon his conviction of giving intoxicating liquor to a minor. Remission grant< d 
May 25, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The clerk, auditor, and treasurer rec- 
ommend that the fine be remitted. The sheriff states that the prisoner's conduct 
while in jail has been exemplary, and that, in his opinion, the ends of justice would 
be subserved by his release. 

Judge Polk says : 

"I am of opinion that said Godfrey has been sufficiently punished, and recom- 
mend executive clemency." 

A number of citizens of Henry county, including the prosecuting attorney elect, 
request his release, and say to me that, to the best of their knowledge, he is a hard- 
working, industrious man, and prior to this charge was never under arrest, or 
.charged with any violation of law. He has been three weeks and five days in jail. 
A remission will enable him to go to work now, while work may be had, and it is 
granted. J. D. W. 

19. To Columbus Houchins and Joseph Houchins, the sum of one hundred 
and forty dollars each, being the residue of a fine of two hundred and eighty dol- 
lars assessed against them by the Pike Circuit Court, at the May term, 1876, upon 
his conviction of an assault and battery, he having paid one-half of the judgment. 
Kemission granted June 1,1877. Decision: By the Governor. Applicants were 
jointly indicted with George Bolan, for an assault and battery upon Christ Smit- 
ten, with intent to murder him, and were tried in the absence of Bolah, who had 
not been arrested. They ask relief from the judgment for the reasons : that they 
were not guilty of the offense charged; that each so testified before the jury; that 
the crime was alleged to have been committed in the night time at Smitten's resi- 
denee, wherefore they were unable to establish their innocence ; that they are young 
married men, farmers by occupation, and poor, striving to make an honest living 
for their families; that neither was ever before convicted of crime; and that the 
fines are excessive and constitute an unusual punishment upon young men of lim- 
ited means. More than one hundred citizens of Pike county, including six jurors, 
concur in their petition and ask that it be granted. The clerk, sheriff, recorder 
and treasurer are of opinion that so much of each fine as may appear excessive 
should be remitted. I am informed that the unusual amount was occasioned by 
an obstinate twelfth juror. He held out for imprisonment in the State prison ; but, 
yielding at last to a punishment by fine, threw into the hat a ballot marked "$5,- 
000," which, when added to the sums fixed by the others and divided by twelve, 
resulted in a fine of $280. A statement of the evidence, certified by the judge and 
furnished to me, contains conflicting statements which show that the jury may 
not have imposed punishment upon the guilty party. "While I am not prepared 
to remit the entire fines, I think the amount excessive under the circumstances, 
and if each defendant will pay one-half his fine, I will remit the residue. 

April 28, 1877. J. D. W. 

20. To Lincoln Hollow ay, the sum of eight hundred dollars, being the resi- 
due of a fine of one thousand dollars assessed against him by the La Porte Circuit 
Court, on the 26th day of May, 1875, upon his conviction of an assault and battery, 
he having paid two hundred dollars on the judgment. Kemission granted June 7, 
1877. Decision: By the Governor. Lincoln Holloway and Newton Holloway were 
indicted for assault and battery with intent to kill and murder Henry J. Finley. 



132 

The}- elected to be tried separately, and the State put this defendant first upon his 
trial, which resulted in his conviction of an assault and battery only, and his im- 
prisonment for thirty days and a fine of one thousand dollars. Newton took a 
change of venue to St. Joseph county, and was convicted of assault and battery 
only, fined two hundred dollars and sentenced to be imprisoned one day. At the 
time of the offense Lincoln was seventeen and Newton nineteen years of age. 
Lincoln has served his term in jail, and I am asked to equalize his fine with that 
imposed upon his brother by remitting the excess over two hundred dollars. Seven 
jurors ask a remission. The judge and prosecuting attorneys recommend as 
follows : 

"I think public justice under the circumstances will be fully satisfied by a re- 
mission of said fine against Lincoln Holloway, but if that is not done it should be 
remitted to $200. Thos. S. Stanfield." 



"I recommend the remission of the fine in this case. 

J. A. Ckawley, Ex-Pros. Att'y." ' 

" I concur in this statement. 

Geo. Ford." 

Many other persons add their joint and separate recommendations to the same 
effect. The clerk, treasurer, sheriff, recorder and deputy sheriff are of the opin- 
ion that it would be proper for me to remit the fine, and assign the following 
reasons: 

"It is true, we believe, as stated in the petition generally signed and hereto 
attached, that said Lincoln Holloway was quite young at the time of the occur- 
rence, and of the two the least to blame, but was tried while considerable excite- 
ment and hard feeling existed, and his punishment was, in our opinion, as com- 
pared with the other defendant, who was older, too severe. He has served his time 
in jail. He now seems, and we believe him to be, a steady, deserving young man, 
and profiting by the lesson and experience of punishment, and trying to make 
amends for the past. We are informed, and believe the truth to be, that said Hol- 
loway has no property whatever." 

After a careful investigation of the facts of the case I am disposed to adopt the 
recommendations made to me in the papers, and, upon proof that two hundred 
dollars have been paid, remit the residue of the judgment. 

J. D. W. 

21. To Symmes M. Jelley, the sum of forty-two and one-half dollars, being 
the residue of a fine of eighty-five dollars assessed against him by the Ohio Circuit 
Court, on the 18th day of April, 1876, upon his conviction of an assault and bat- 
terry, one-half of the judgment having been paid. Remission granted June 15, 
1877. Decision: By the Governor. The clerk, ex-clerk, treasurer, sheriff, and re- 
corder of the county, the trustee of Randolph township and eleven jurors express 
the opinion in writing that it would be proper for me to remit the fine, and make a 
statement of facts tending to show that the young man committed the assault and 
battery in defence of his person against a superior force. The difficulty arose 
because of objection made by the injured party to defendant's visiting his daughter, 
and a request that he discontinue his attentions. The request may have been ac- 
companied by threats and an attempt to chastise the unwelcome escort on his return 
with the daughter from a party. The judge concurs in the petition, the case being 
in his opinion one in which executive clemency may be properly interposed, The 



133 

deputy prosecuting attorney who prosecuted the case concurs with the judge. 
The burden of the judgment rests upon the father of the young man. I under- 
stand that the costs which must he paid amount to $76.70. Upon the recommenda- 
tions made, I am disposed to grant partial relief and when one-half of the judgment 
shall have been paid will remit the residue. J. D. W. 

May 23, 1877. 

22. To Daniel Fox, the sum of two hundred dollars, being the amount of a 
fine assessed against him by the Johnson Circuit Court, on the 27th day of Febru- 
ary, 1877, upon his conviction of an assault and battery. Eemission granted June 
19th, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The defendant was indicted of an assault 
and battery with intent to commit a rape, and was by a jury convicted of assault 
and battery only, and sentenced to be imprisoned in the county jail twenty-four 
hours, and fined two hundred dollars. He served his term in jail and because of 
his inability to pay the fine has been held until now. The clerk, sheriff and other 
citizens of the county, ask that he be now released. The judge says: 

"In view of the evidence, and the imprisonment of defendant for a long time 
before his trial, and his imprisonment since, I feel that this is a proper case for the 
exercise of executive clemency. K. M. Hoed 

Judge Sixteenth Circuit." 

On the 25th of April the prosecuting attorney, by letter, objected to a remission 
and asked that I allow the prisoner to remain a while longer. I have pursued his 
recommendation nearly two months, and now adopt that of the judge, and grant 
a remission. J. D. W. 

23. To Albert Hatjseurder the sum of ten dollars, being the amount of a 
fine assessed against him by George W. Smith, a justice of the peace of Jefferson 
county, on the 22d day of March, 1877, upon his conviction of disturbing a reli- 
gious meeting. Eemission granted June 22, 1877. Decision : By the Governor. The 
clerk, auditor, treasurer, a commissioner, several deputies of county officers, the 
justice of the peace, several other justices of the county, and the constable, repre- 
sent to me that "Young Hausfurder is a boy of the age of thirteen years, and uni- 
formly maintained a good reputation for good conduct and morality. The fine 
and costs were replevied by the father of said boy, whose name was Jacob Haus- 
furder, and on an occasion, coming from North Madison to the city of Madi- 
son, some time in May, by the explosion of a locomotive called 'M. G-. Bright,' 
Jacob Hausfurder was killed. He leaves a large family of helpless children, and 
young Albert is making every exertion in his power to earn a living for the be- 
reaved family, who are left in indigent circumstances. We, your petitioners, are 
of the opinion that this is a case in which executive clemency might with pro- 
priety be used." 

The pastor and other persons, members of the church at North Madison, who 
were present at the meeting, recommend a remission, and it is granted. 

J. D. W. 

24. To Albert McDonald the sum of one hundred dollars, being the residue 
of a judgment for two hundred dollars rendered against him by the St. Joseph 
Circuit Court, on the 29th day of May, 1877, upon a forfeited recognizance where- 
in he was bound as a surety for the appearance of David S. McDonald to answer a 
charge of obtaining property by false pretenses, he having paid one hundred dol- 
lars on the judgment. Remission granted June 22, 1877. Decision : By the Gover- 



134 

nor. The first application was for a remission of the amount of the bond. An 
entry of the forfeiture only had then been made. The cause of action has now 
been merged into a judgment against the surety, the action having been continued 
as to the principal. The clerk, auditor, treasurer, deputy treasurer and sheriff are 
of the opinion that it would be proper for me to remit the unpaid residue. The 
prosecuting attorney makes the same recommendation. The principal is father of 
the surety. At the time of his arrest he was a resident of Michigan, and uince the 
execution of the bond has gone to Canada, with the declared intention of never re- 
turning. The offense charged is not one of those enumerated in the treaty of ex- 
tradition with Great Britain, and the surety can not therefore return his principal 
to make answer thereto. (See case of Lewis Armstrong, ante.) The applicant, by 
his own affidavit and that of other creditable persons, shows that his father left no 
property subject to execution, and that he has no means of indemnification. I 
think that, under the circumstances shown, he should be relieved of further liabil- 
ity upon the judgment. J. D. W. 

25. To John B. Weeter the sum of two hundred dollars, being the amount 
of a judgment rendered against him by the Posey Circuit Court, at its January 
term, 1877, upon a forfeited recognizance wherein he was bound as a surety for the 
appearance in said court of one Horatio Weever, to answer the charge of assault 
and battery with intent to murder. Remission granted July 19th, 1877. Decision: 
By the Governor. The surety is a brother of the principal, and has no indemnity 
for the payment of the judgment. After the judgment was rendered, the principal 
voluntarily appeared, and was tried and acquitted of the charge, the prosecuting 
attorney having withdrawn the case from the jury and submitted it to the judge« 
who, without hesitation, pronounced the defendant not guilty. The clerk, auditor, 
recorder, sheriff, and treasurer of Posey county, and the judge and prosecuting 
attorney of the court are of the opinion that the judgment should be remitted. As 
it has served its purpose, I concur in the opinion. The remission is granted. 

J. D. W. 

26. To Nancy J. Stone the sum of twenty-five dollars, being the residue of a 
judgment for fifty dollars rendered against her by the Putnam Circuit Court, on 
the twenty-third day of February, 1877, upon a forfeited recognizance wherein she 
was bound as a surety for the appearance in said court of James L. Stone, to answer 
a charge of intoxication, she having paid one-half of the judgment. Remission 
granted July 24, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The surety is the mother of the 
principal. She shows by her affidavit that her son has left for parts unknown to 
her, and has now been absent for more than six months; that ho has in no way or 
manner indemnified her for the payment of the bond, and she thinks he never will 
pay one dollar of it. She is a widow with a family of children. Her property 
consists of her house and lot in Putnamville, worth not more than two hundred 
dollars, and her necessary furniture. The judge, prosecuting attorney, clerk of the 
court, and sheriff, treasurer, auditor, and recorder of Putnam county, "being con- 
vinced of the truth of the facts hereinbefore set forth, and that the cause of the 
petitioner is one that merits the mercy and clemency of the Executive, have no 
hesitancy in saying that the interests of the community and State will be subserved 
by the remission of the forfeiture against Nancy J. Stone." As the offense charged 
is one of a minor grade, and the payment of the entire judgment will impose a 
great hardship upon the suffering mother, I am disposed to grant her partial relieft 
and upon proof of the payment by her of one-half, will remit the residue of the 
judgment. J. D. W. 



135 

27. To John L. Monjar the sum of two hundred dollars, being the residue of 
a fine of three hundred and fifty dollars assessed against him by the Shelby Circuit 
Court on the 6th day of June, 1877, upon his conviction of an assault and battery, 
one hundred and fifty dollars having been paid on the judgment. Remission 
granted August 22, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The clerk of the circuit 
court, the auditor, recorder, sheriff, treasurer and all the commissioners of Shelby 
county have given me their written opinion that it would be proper for me to 
remit a portion of the fine. They say the conviction rested upon the testimony of 
a single witness as to the circumstances of the alleged offense, and they have 
serious doubts as to the truth of her story and the defendant's guilt. An exami- 
nation of the evidence as certified to me has led me to concur in their opinion. 
The judge has written me, saying: 

"In the application of John L. Monjar for remission of fine, I would say that 
the fine of the jury was somewhat severe, and think I can consistently recommend 
your Excellency to remit the sum of two hundred dollars, which would leave the 
fine sufficiently severe under the circumstances as I view them." 

I adopt this recommendation, and, payment of the excess having been made, a 
remittitur will issue accordingly. J. D. W. 

28. To James Burk the sum of twenty-five dollars, being the amount of a fine 
assessed against him by the Eandolph Circuit Court on the 1st day of January, 
1877, upon his conviction of an assault and battery. Remission granted October 
4, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The judge and clerk of the court and the 
auditor, recorder, treasurer, sheriff and commissioners of Randolph county are of 
the opinion that I should remit the defendant's fine for the following reasons: that 
the offense was committed without any intention to injure the person assaulted, and 
was done in the heat of passion; that the injury done was of no serious conse- 
quence; that the defendant is very poor, and his replevin bail will have it to pay. 
The lieutenant governor is familiar with the facts and recommends a remission. 
The remission is granted. J D. W. 

29. To Gotlieb Meyor, the sum of one hundred dollars, being the amount of a 
fine assessed against him by the Marion Criminal Circuit Court, on the 6th day of 
July, 1877, upon his conviction of an assault and battery. Remission granted 
October 6, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The defendant was sentenced to be 
imprisoned ninety days and to pay this fine. He has served his term in jail 
and must, now be held for his fine unless relieved of its payment. I am asked by 
the judge and prosecuting attorney of the court and the sheriff, treasurer, auditor 
and recorder of Marion county, to remit the fine. In their petition they say that 
Meyor is the sole support of a wife and ten children who are now reduced to very 
stringent circumstances ; that if he is required to serve out his fine, his family 
must go to the poor-house ; and that he has heretofore borne a good reputation as 
an orderly and law-abiding citizen. I accept these reasons as sufficient in this case 
and will grant the application. J. D. W. 

30. To Newton Smith, the sum of one hundred and sixty-two and one-half 
dollars, being the residue of a fine of three hundred and twenty-five dollars assess- 
ed against him by the Johnson Circuit Court, at its September term, 1877, upon 
his conviction of an assault and battery, he having paid one-half of the judgment. 
Remission granted November 1, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. In addition to 
the fine imposed, the defendant was committed for five days to the county jail. 



136 

The clerk of the court, the auditor, treasurer, sheriff, recorder and two commis- 
sioners, the township trustee and other citizens of Johnson county, are of the opin- 
ion that the fine is excessive and should be remitted. They say " thai he has 
served out his term of imprisonment and that it will take all the property the said 
Newton Smith is pessessed of to pay off the judgment and costs in said cause." I 
am disposed to grant partial relief, and, upon the payment of one-half, will remit 
the residue of the judgment unless objection be made. J. D. W. 

31. To William N. Bailey, the sum of twenty-five dollars, being the residue 
of a fine of fifty dollars assessed against him by the Morgan Circuit Court, at its 
September term, 1877, upon his conviction of the crime of petit larceny, he hav- 
ing paid one-half. Remission granted November 7, 1877. Decision: By the Gov- 
ernor. The larceny consisted in the taking of some meat. The punishment was 
fixed at ten days' imprisonment in the county jail and this fine. The defendant 
has served his term in jail and is held for the fine. The clerk of the court and the 
auditor, treasurer and sheriff of Morgan county and some citizens ask that it be 
remitted. They say the crime was committed by the defendant while intoxicated 
and at the instigation of others; that he is an industrious, hard-working, but very 
poor man; that he has a wife and five small and destitute children, who must be- 
come a charge upon the public, unless he be released to provide for them, which 
they think he will do. The prosecuting attorney recommends a remission. When 
he pays one-half the fine, the other half will be remitted. 

J. D. W. 

32. To John Sumner and Willis Bolin, the sum of two hundred dollars 
being the residue of a judgment for three hundred dollars rendered against them 
by the Perry Circuit Court, on the 12th day of February, 1877, upon a forfeited 
recognizance wherein they were bound as sureties for the appearance in said court 
of one Jacob Forbes to answer to a charge of rape, they having paid one hundred 
dollars. Bemission granted November 8, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The 
application is signed by the judge and prosecuting attorney and others, and shows 
that the burden of the judgment rests upon the surety Sumner, whose wife is the 
mother of the principal. He has paid the one hundred dollars already applied on 
the judgment. He has but limited means and is advanced in years. The clerk 
of the court, the auditor, recorder, treasurer, and president of the board of 
commissioners of Perry county have given me their opinion that the residue of the 
judgment should be remitted. The signatures of the other commissioners appear 
to the application. Affidavits are made to the truth of the statements by credible 
persons of the county, and I am assured that the surety Sumner has no means of 
indemnification for payments made. Having no real estate, he gave Bolin a chattel 
mortgage to induce him to become a co-surety, the officers being unwilling to 
aecept him alone. In their opinion, the officers say: 

"The defendant Jacob Forbes owned no property when he left, and we think 
he never will, but left his wife and two young children destitute on the hands of 
Sumner, who has supported them ever since and in our opinion there is no prospect 
of any future indemnity to Sumner for any sums he has paid or may pay on 
account of Forbes." 

It seems unjust to enforce the payment of the residue of the judgment from a 
man alreadyjbo grievously burdened, and it will be remitted. J. D. W. 



137 

33. To Alfred N. Towles and Kobert P. Towles the sum of forty dollars, 
being the residue of three fines (numbered 537, 538 and 539) assessed against them 
by the Hendricks Circuit Court, at its June term, 1877, upon their conviction of 
unlawful sales of intoxicating liquors, they having paid forty dollars on the judg- 
ments. Remission granted November 16, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The 
applicants were druggists. Their conviction was solely upon the testimony of the 
person to whom the sales were made. He was a man of excellent personal and 
business reputation in Danville. They say he represented to them that he needed 
the liquor strictly for medical purposes, and that they relied upon his statements, 
and each supposed he was making a lawful sale. They have paid the costs, and 
ask a remission of the fines. The clerk of the court, the auditor, treasurer and 
sheriff and other citizens of Hendricks county recommend the remission. One- 
half will be remitted upon payment of one-half. J. D. W. 

34. To Charles Brownlee the sum of two hundred dollars, being the amount of 
a judgment rendered against him by the Sullivan Circuit Court, on the 22d day of 
June, 1877, upon a forfeited recognizance wherein he was bound as a surety for the 
appearance in said court of one Hugh Brownlee to answer to a charge of petit 
larceny. Remission granted December 11, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The 
principal made default on the 2d day of April last. This judgment was rendered 
at the next term. In October the principal was arrested, convicted and sentenced 
to the penitentiary. It is now too late for the surety to avail himself of this de- 
fence to the action on the bond, but the prosecuting attorney, the county officers 
and other citizens are of the opinion that he should be relieved of the judgment. 
The remission is granted. J. D. W. 

35. To Joseph A. Dotjthitt the sum of fifty dollars, being the residue of a 
fine of one hundred dollars assessed against him by the Vanderburg Circuit Court 
at its September term, 1877, upon his conviction therein of the crime of grand 
larceny, the sum of fifty dollars having been paid on the judgment. Remission 
granted December 14, 1877. Decision: By the Governor. The defendant was sen- 
tenced to ninety days in the county prison. His term will expire to-day. He 
says in his sworn statement that he " has no money with which to pay the said fine 
and costs, and that he has no friends possessed of the means or disposition to lend 
him assistance, excepting only a brother, who has paid the costs and deposited fifty 
dollars with the county clerk to pay [on ?] the fine of this affiant in the event of 
the remission of one-half of said fine." The judge, prosecuting attorney and 
clerk of the court and the sheriff, auditor, treasurer and recorder of Vanderburgh 
county have given me their opinion in writing that it would be proper for me to 
grant the application. They say: 

"A brother of the prisoner is here from the State of Illinois, and after paying 
traveling expenses, etc., has left money enough to pay fifty dollars, one-half of the 
said fine, and costs of prosecution; " that this is the best that they can do, and that 
keeping the prisoner two hundred and forty days will cost the county one hundred 
and forty-four dollars, which expense will never be reimbursed, and the school 
fund will fail to receive the fifty dollars now tendered. Upon proof of the pay- 
ment on the judgment of the fifty dollars deposited with the clerk a remittitur of 
the residue will issue. J. D. W. 

36. To Benjamin F. Hats the sum of fifty dollars, being the residue of a fine 
of one hundred dollars assessed against him by the Boone Circuit Court on the 



138 

18th day of September, 1877, upon his conviction of an unlawful sale of intoxi- 
cating liquors, he having paid one-half. Eemission granted December 20, 1877. 
Decision: By the Governor. In a petition signed by a large number of attorneys 
and by the clerk of the court, the sheriff, treasurer, auditor, recorder and presi- 
dent of the board of commissioners of Boone county, and the prosecuting attorney, 
they say: "We deem the said fines to be oppressive," and ask that I remit such 
portion as I may think just. I assume that the petitioners regard the fines- as exces- 
sive. Upon the payment of one-half the residue will be remitted. 

Octobkr 15, 1877. J. D, W. 



139 



SERIES OF 1878. 



1. 


Dudley Kogers. 


18. 


2. 


Smith N. Fowler. 


19. 


3. 


James Convery. 


20. 


4. 


George Graham. 


21. 


5. 


Wayne Boggs. 




6. 


LaFayette Gibson. 


22. 


7. 


David Hazen. 


23 


8. 


Oscar 0. Parker. 


24. 


9. 


Ealph C. J. Pendleton. 


25. 


10. 


Henry Sturgeon. 


26. 


11. 


Lear A. Merritt. 


27. 


12. 


John K. King. 


28. 


13. 


James McBride. 


29. 


14. 


"William Shannon. 


30. 


15. 


Sebastian Gross. 


31. 


16. 


Richard Grimes and Nancy 


32. 




Lanning. 


33. 


17. 


Milam D. Fletcher. 


34. 



Samuel Morgan. 
John "W. W. Hindman. 
Isaac Mayfield. 
"William H. Baker and 
Mortimer K. Goodrich. 
James Drake. 
"Watson "W. Pryor. 
George Klein. 
Ernst Harmes, 
Adolphus Shaffer. 
"William Kennett. 
Nicholas Shafer. 
Orlando B. Dicks. 
"William Rose. 
"William Campbell. 
Aurelius Smith. 
Abraham W. Porter. 
James Lucas. 



1. To Dudley Rogers the sum of four hundred and eighty-nine dollars, being 
the unsatisfied residue of a judgment for six hundred dollars, rendered against him 
by the Putnam Circuit Court, on the 14th day of April, 1870, upon a forfeited 
recognizance wherein he was bound as a surety for the appearance in said court of 
one George "West, to answer a criminal charge. Remission granted January 10, 
1878. Decision: By the Governor. This application is made under oath by Robert 
Smith and "William C. Hendricks. The defendant, Rogers, has become insolvent. 
The applicants are large creditors, and, to secure themselves, have bought other 
prior judgments which were liens on real estate of Rogers. Twenty judgments of 
five dollars each, rendered as fines, and a judgment for six hundred dollars upon a 
forfeited recognizance, constitute prior liens in favor of the State. They ask a 
remission that the lien may be discharged. The deputy prosecuting attorney (now 
prosecuting attorney,) the clerk of the court, and the auditor, treasurer, recorder, 
and sheriff of Putnam county, have recommended the granting of the application. 
On December 9, 1876, my predecessor in office decided that he could not interfere. 
Upon a full consideration of the facts and circumstances shown, and the opinions 
and recommendations of local officers, who are presumably acquainted with therm 
1 am disposed to grant partial relief. Upon payment of one-half I will remit the 
residue. 

April 10, 1877. 



140 

Payment of one-half the gross amount of principal and interest of the twenty-one 
judgments against Kogers is expected. 
November 30, 1877. 

The amended certificate of the clerk shows an overlooked credit of thirty dollars 
on the $600 judgment and payments, as required by this decision, as follows: 
Twenty judgments of five dollars each ($100), and accrued interest ($43 50), in full; 
$345.50 on the principal ($570), and accrued interest of the $600 judgment, making 
four hundred and eighty-nine dollars in all, and leaving an unsatisfied residue of 
the main judgment in the same amount, which is accordingly remitted. 

J. D. W. 

2. To Smith N, Fowler the turn of two hundred and seventy dollars, feeing 
the residue of a fine of four hundred and fifty dollars assessed against him by the 
Dearborn Circuit Court, at its November term, 1877, upon his conviction of the 
crime of fornication, one hundred and eighty dollars having been paid on the 
judgment. Kemission granted January 31, 1878. Decision : By the Governor. (See 
pardon No. 13, series of 1878.) 

3. To James Convery the sum of one hundred dollars, being the amount of a 
fine assessed against him by the Knox Circuit Court, at the September term, 1877, 
upon his conviction of the crime of assault and battery. Kemission granted Feb- 
ruary 2, 1878. Decision : By the Governor. (See pardon No. 14, series of 1878.) 

4. To George Graham the sum of one hundred dollars, being the amount of a 
fine assessed against him by the Allen Criminal Circuit Court, on the 29th day of 
May, 1873, upon his conviction of the crime of grand larceny. Kemission granted 
February 21, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. (See pardon No. 21, series of 1878.) 

5. To "Wayne Boggs the sum of one hundred and thirty dollars, being the 
amount of a fine adjudged against him by the Koseiusko Circuit Court, on the 10th 
day of January, 1875, upon his conviction of an assault and battery. Remission 
granted February 21, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. The clerk, auditor, treas- 
urer, sheriff and recorder of the county, in an opinion received in 1875, express 
the belief that the fine was unjustly assessed, and should be remitted. The costs 
amounted to more than the fine. The deputy prosecuting attorney says: 

* * * "Believing said fine to be unjust, in the light of recent evidence, and 
and he having paid the costs in full in said cause, I now join in the request and 
recommend the remission of said fine." 

I am reliably informed tbat the defendant is a young man of good character, 
and a peaceable, law-abiding citizen of Kosciusko county. The prosecuting wit- 
ness and his brother, who is superintendent of the schools of the county, recom- 
mend a remission. The judge, in a recent letter, says: 

" I am informed the prosecuting witness, since the trial of the cause, concedes that 
he was mistaken upon the trial in regard to some facts tending to aggravate the of- 
fense. 1 have known Mr. Boggs ever since his childhood. He is, in every (way)» 
a reliable man. His father is one of the best men of this county, and may call 
upon you personally. I recommend that the fine, under this new statement of the 
facts, be remitted." 

The remission is granted. J. D. W. 



141 

6. To Lafayette Gibson, the sum of one thousand dollars, being the amount 
■of a fine adjudged against him by the Pike Circuit Court, on the 16th day of 
March, 1877, upon his conviction of an assault and battery. Remission granted 
February 22, 1878. Decision : By the Governor. This application was received Oc- 
tober 2, 1877. It is made by jurors, officers and citizens of Pike county. It shows 
that in addition to this penalty the defendant was sentenced to be imprisoned in 
the county prison six months. That term had then been served. In their opinion 
the fine is excessive and, as the defendant has no means to pay it, the execution of 
the judgment is too expensive to the county. The clerk of the court and the 
auditor, treasurer and sheriff of the county are of opinion that it would be proper 
for me to remit the fine. They say that the injury was inflicted with a broom- 
handle; that the prisoner has been confined in the jail of a neighboring county, 
the jail of their own county being insecure; that the prisoner and his friends are 
too poor to pay the fine ; that in their opinion the ends of justice have been ac- 
complished ; that it is a great expense to the county, and will be for more than 
three years yet to come, and that from their knowledge two-thirds of the tax- 
payers are in favor of a remission of the fine. The judge and prosecuting attor- 
ney recommend a remission. The judge has made me a full statement of the evi- 
dence. I am advised by other gentlemen that the circumstances of the case will 
now justify favorable action. The remission is granted. J. D W. 

7. To David Hazen, the sum of twenty-five dollars, being the residue of a 
fine of fifty dollars adjudged against him by the Pulaski Circuit Court, on the 23d 
day of June, 1877, upon his conviction of keeping a gaming house, he having paid 
one-half the judgment. Piemission granted March 1, 1878. Decision: By the Gov- 
ernor. The clerk of the court, and the auditor, treasurer, sheriff and recorder of 
Pulaski county, are of opinion that it would be proper for me to remit the fine 
" for the reasons that the gaming said to have taken place in his saloon was, in all 
probability, without his knowledge, and certainly was against his general orders, 
and, further, that gaming was not generally practiced in his saloon." By request of 
the applicant, Hon. S. E. Perkins has made me a written statement in which he says: 

" The case was appealed to the Supreme court. It fell to me in the distribution 
of causes. I examined it with care, and, while I did not, and the court did not 
think, under the rules of law, we could properly reverse the judgment of the cir- 
cuit court, yet I have no hesitation in saying that it is a proper case for the exer- 
cise of the executive power of remission. The cause was a doubtful one upon the 
evidence, and a large portion of his witnesses were absent and a continuance of his 
cause was not granted, so that he was tried under disadvantageous circumstances." 

Upon the payment of one-half the judgment, the residue will be remitted. 
February 2, 1878. J. D. W. 

8. To Oscar O. Parker, the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars, being the 
residue of a. judgment for five hundred dollars rendered against him by the Pike 
Circuit Court, on the 5th day of October, 1875, upon a forfeited recognizance, 
wherein he was bound as a surety for the appearance in said court of James E. 
Parker to answer a charge by indictment of perjury, he having paid one-half. 
Eemission granted March 1, 1878. Decision : By the Governor. This application 
was filed October 23, 1875. My predecessor made no formal decision. Additional 
papers have since been filed, and, by my requirement, one-half the judgment has 
been paid by the surety. The county officers of Pike county are of opinion that 



142 

1 should remit the residue. The surety shows by. his affidavit that his principal 
" absconded from the county aforesaid, prior to the May term, 1875, of the Pike 
circuit court, leaving no property, rights, credits, moneys or effects, out of which 
the judgment of forfeiture taken against him and this deponent at said term, or 
any part thereof, could be made, and that the whereabouts of said James E. Parker 
is unknown to affiant." 

The remission is granted. J. D. W. 

9. To Kalph 0. J. Pendleton the sum of sixty-two and one half dollars, be- 
ing the residue of a judgment for one hundred and twenty-five dollars rendered 
against him by the Superior Court of Marion county, on the 27th day of Septem- 
ber, 1877, upon a forfeited recognizance wherein he was bound as a surety for the 
appearance in the Marion Criminal Circuit Court of one William M. Smith to 
answer a charge of grand larceny therein pending against him, one-half thereof 
and accrued interest having been paid by the surety. Remission granted March 
9. 1878. Decision: By the Governor. The county officers are of opinion that it 
would be proper for me to remit the judgment. The applicant has made me a full 
statement of the circumstances under which he incurred the liability. The princi- 
pal, had at one time been in his employ, and during that time had so conducted 
himself as to gain his entire confidence, being always reliable and temperate in his 
habits. Being in destitute circumstances, he took a horse from one of the streets 
of Indianapolis and rode him to the country in search of employment. When he 
took the horse, he left a note in the carriage sayiDg that he would return him the 
next day, and when arrested on suspicion of being in wrongful possession of the 
animal was on his return to the city. It is doubtful if he. was guilty of a felonious 
taking. The surety has endeavored to secure the return of his principal, but has 
failed. In. my opinion partial relief from the judgment should be afforded him, 
and upon payment of one-half the residue will be remitted. J. D. W. 

March 7, 1878. 

10. To Henry Sturgeon the sum of fifty dollars, being the residue of a fine of 
one hundred dollars adjudged against him by the Switzerland Circuit Court, at its 
June term, 1877, upon his conviction of aa assault and battery, he having paid 
one-half thereof. Remission granted March 11, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. 
This application is made by respectable citizens of Switzerland county. They say: 
"That at the adjourned June term, 1877, of the Switzerland Circuit Court, an 
indictment was pending against the said Henry Sturgeon charging him with an 
assault and battery upon the person of George Sturgeon; that the defendant, 
Henry Sturgeon, plead guilty to the charge, and the court assessed his fine at one 
hundred dollars and imprisonment in the county jail for ten days. Mr. Sturgeon 
has served out his term of imprisonment of ten days, and, to relieve him from 
further confinement, some of his friends went his security; that said judgment of 
one hundred dollars is still due and unpaid ; that the said Henry Sturgeon is a poor 
man not the owner of any real estate, and of but a small amount of personal 
property — not to exceed in value three hundred dollars ; that he has a wife and 
ten children depending upon him for their support and maintenance; that it would 
necessarily greatly embarrass him to pay said amount, and would be but taking 
from his wife and children the necessaries of life, and to that extent rob them of a 
livinc. We would, therefore, most respectfully request and recommend that said 
judgment and fine of one hundred dollars be remitted, believing that the ends of 
justice would be promoted thereby." 



143 

The county officers are of opinion that it would be right and proper, and would 
meet the approbation of a great majority of the citizens of the county if I would 
remit the fine. The injured party recommends a remission. Upon payment of 
one-half the judgment the residue will be remitted. J. D. "W. 

11. To Lear A. Merritt the sum of four hundred dollars, being the residue 
of a judgment for five hundred dollars rendered against her by the Franklin 
Circuit Court, on the 27th day of December, 1876, upon a forfeited recognizance, 
wherein she was bound as a surety for the appearance in said court of John Merritt^ 
to answer a charge of perjury, she having paid one hundred dollars. Kemission 
granted March 23, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. John Merritt was indicted 
and found guilty of adultery and adjudged to pay a fine and costs amounting to 
about four hundred dollars. Having no means wherewith to satisfy the judgment, 
his widowed mother paid the amount. He was then indicted for testifying falsely 
in his own behalf on his trial. She became surety for his appearance. He has left 
no property out of which this judgment can be made. She has a small farm, said 
to be worth about nine hundred dollars, from which she derives her living. She is 
now about sixty years of age, and has no one who would probably take care of her. 
Upon these and other facts, the county officers are of opinion that it would be 
proper for me to remit the judgment. The case is certainly one of great hardship. 
If the surety will pay one hundred dollars I will remit the residue. 

March 14, 1878. J. D. "W. 

12. To John E. King the sum of two hundred dollars, being the residue of a 
judgment for four hundred dollars, rendered against him by the Putnam Circuit 
Court, on the 7th day of March, 1878, upon a forfeited recognizance, wherein he 
was bound as a surety for the appearance of Daniel M. Cole, to answer a charge of 
assault and battery with intent to kill, two hundred dollars having been paid. 
Kemission granted March 25, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. The principal is 
said to have removed to parts unknown. His mother, an aged widow, has secured 
the surety against loss. Respectable citizens ask that the forfeiture be remitted in 
whole or in part. 

The judge says: 

" I concur in recommending a remittance of part of the forfeiture." 

The surety says, under oath : 

"Alice Cole, the mother of said Daniel M. Cole, has fully indemnified and secured 
me against all loss and liability. To collect said forfeiture would greatly distress 
and annoy Mrs. Alice Cole, who is the real party who will pay said forfeiture. 
That she is a poor woman, living on a small farm, which is her only means of 
support." 

The clerk, auditor, treasurer, and recorder have signed the petition. Upon pay- 
ment of one-half the judgment, I will remit the residue. J. D. "W. 
March 22, 1878. 

13. To James McBride the sum of ten dollars, being the residue of a fine of 
twenty dollars adjudged against him by the Marion Criminal Circuit Court upon 
his conviction (in case numbered 9,599) of selling intoxicating liquor without a 
license, he having paid ten dollars on the judgment. Kemission granted April 15> 
1878. Decision : By the Governor. This applicant was granted a license by an order 



144 

of the board of commissioners of Marion county, made on the 5th day of Septem- 
ber, 1876. He did not commence to sell under authority of the license issued to 
him until December 20, 1876, and did not apply for and receive another license 
until December 20, 1877. The sale for which he was indicted was made Septem- 
ber 21, 1877, after the expiration of one year from the date of the order, but during 
the year which he supposed was covered by the license. The judge signs the 
defendant's application. The clerk, auditor, sheriff, and treasurer recommend a 
remission. The defendant has, by my requirement, paid ten dollars. A remission 
of the residue will be granted. ■ J. D. W. 

14. To William Shannon the sum of fifty dollars, being the amount of a fine 
adjudged against him by the Jefferson Circuit Court, on the 15th day of December, 
1877, upon his conviction of the crime of petit larceny. Kemission granted May 
23, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. (See pardon decision No. 44, series of 1878.) 

15. To Sebastian Gross, the sum of twenty-five dollars, being the residue of 
a fine of fifty dollars adjudged against him by the Pulaski Circuit Court, at its Oc- 
tober term, 1877, upon his conviction of keeping a gaming-house, he having paid 
one-half the judgment. Eemission granted May 28, 1878. Decision: By the Gov- 
ernor. The auditor, treasurer, recorder, sheriff, surveyor of the county and the 
clerk of the court, join with the defendant in asking that the fine be remitted " for 
the reason that the gaming for which he was convicted, was done against his ex- 
press command and contrary to his wishes." A statement of the evidence is fur- 
nished. B. W. Eodabaugh says, that he was the person who, it was alleged, was 
engaged in the gaming, and that Gross knew nothing about the game that he play- 
ed in his house; that he and a man they call a New York Jew, did play a game of 
billiards for two dollars in money, and the money was quietly and privately put in 
the pocket of the billiard-table and, after he won it, he gave it back to the Jew ; and 
this was all the gaming for money or other articles of value that he knows any- 
thing about. Upon proof of the payment of one-half the fine I will remit the 
residue. J. D. W. 

16. To Bichard Grimes and Nancy Lanning, the sum of four hundred and 
fifty dollars, being the residue of a judgment for five hundred dollars rendered 
against them by the Blackford Circuit Court, on the 15th day of December, 1875, 
upon a forfeited recognizance wherein they were bound as sureties for the appear- 
ance in said court of one Isaac Vanscyhawk, to answer a charge of grand larceny, 
fifty dollars having been paid on the judgment. Eemission granted June 8, 1878. 
Decision: By the Governor. Isaac Vanscyhawk was arrested before a justice of the 
peace of Blackford county, for stealing bacon of the value of seven dollars and 
fifty cents. Nancy Lanning and Eichard Grimes became his sureties for his ap- 
pearance at court in a recognizance of $500. He failed to appear, and the recog- 
nizance was declared forfeited and judgment rendered thereon against the sureties 
for $500. The sureties are persons of limited means, not able to pay the judgment 
without serious embarrassments. Mrs. Lanning is a widow and pensioner. I 
think the bail was too heavy, and that $200 would have been sufficient. Upon the 
payment of $200 I will remit the residue as to the sureties. As the prosecuting 
attorney has proceeded to judgment, I think it proper that the commission allowed 
by law shall be paid upon the whole judgment. 

March 20, 1876. T. A. H. 



145 

Supplemental Decision: By the Governor. By reason of a clerical error in com- 
municating the foregoing decision to the surety, Grimes, he understood that upon 
payment of the fifty dollars commission due to the prosecuting attorney upon col- 
lection of the judgment, the residue would he remitted. He accordingly paid that 
amount, and forwarded the receipt of the prosecuting attorney attested by the cer- 
tificate of the clerk of the court, and expected the remittitur of the residue. Tha 
county officers of Blackford county certified in' June, 1877, "that the above named 
defendants are poor people ; that said Nancy is the owner of one-third of forty 
acres of land ; that said Kichard, the other defendant, is the owner of forty 
acres of real estate with an incumbrance of $100; that it is all the real estate owned 
by either; and that neither owns personal property to exceed one hundred dollars 
and that both said defendants have large families to support; that the judgment 
rendered against said defendants was for the sum of $500, and that they have paid 
$50," and recommend that I remit the residue of the judgment and interest. The 
case is one of peculiar hardship. The land of Grimes has been offered for sale 
upon execution but no one has offered to buy it. If deprived of his land, Grimes 
will become a county charge. The attorney general has become familiar with the 
case through the investigations of his deputy. The deputy regards it as a proper 
case for executive interference. The residue of the judgment will be remitted. 

J. D. W. 

17. To Milam D. Fletcher, the sum of two hundred and ninety-five dollars, 
being the residue of a fine of three hundred and seventy dollars adjudged against 
him by the Martin Circuit Court on the 10th day of April, 1878, upon his convic- 
tion of the crime of trespass, seventy-five dollars having been paid on the 
judgment. Kemission granted June 14, 1878. Decision: By the Governor, The 
petition is signed by citizens of Martin county. The judge of the court writes 
as follows : 

"West Shoals, Ind., April 10, 1878. 
To the Governor : 

At the present term of the Martin Circuit Court Milam D. Fletcher was tried 
by a jury upon an indictment for cutting trees upon lands of another without 
license from competent authority. The jury found him guilty, and assessed a fine 
against him at three hundred and seventy dollars, ($370.00). The fine was the 
utmost limit allowed by any testimony in the case, and was evidently based upon 
the assumption that he was responsible for all the timber cut. There was no direct 
testimony of his cutting any of the timber and the State relied for conviction 
upon proof of his admisssons implicating him with others who cut the timber. 
The statute imposes a fine of five times the value of the timber cut. While I do 
not question the defendant's guilt, I think the verdict under all the circumstances 
was too severe. Had I tried the case I should not have assessed a fine of over $75 
or $100. Upon a careful consideration of the matter, I am satisfied that a remis- 
sion of, say, $300 of the fine would not do any injustice to the State, and that the 
residue of the fine and costs would be ample to punish the defendant and furnish 
a warning to others. I therefore recommend a remission of $300 of the fine. 
Very truly, N. F. Malott, 

Judge Martin Circuit Court." 

The prosecuting attorney writes: 

"In a case just tried in the Martin Circuit Court of the State vs. Milam D. 
Fletcher, for trespass on real estate, the jury found the value of the timber taken 
to be $74, and therefore fined him $370. The evidence was only circumstantial, 

10 Pardons. 



146 

and owing to the fact that the defendant is a cripple, I think it is a cause where it 
would not be improper t© exercise the executive clemency. I would therefore 
recommend a remission of all but $74." 

A transcript of the record and recommendations of counsel engagpd in the case 
are also filed. The clerk of the court and the auditor, sheriff and treasurer of 
Martin county are of the opinion that it would be proper for me to remit a portion 
of the fine for the reasons "that the testimony against the said Fletcher was chiefly 
circumstantial and the amount of the fine excessive." Upon the payment of $75 
the residue will be remitted. J. D. "W. 

May 23, 1878. 

18. To Samuel Morgan the sum of one hundred dollars, being the amount of 
a fine adjudged against him by the Miami Circuit Court, on the 17th day of April, 
1878, upon his conviction of the crime of assault and battery. Remission granted 
June 20, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. (See pardon decision JSJo. 55, series of 
1878.) 

19. To John "W. W. Hindmah the sum of one hundred dollars, being the 
amount of a fine adjudged against him by the "Wayne Circuit Court, on the 15th 
day of December, 1877, upon his conviction of the crime of kidnaping. Remis- 
sion granted June 25, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. The defendant shows in 
his application that upon conviction he was sentenced to six months' imprisonment 
in the county jail and fined one hundred dollars; that he has served out faithfully 
his term of imprisonment, is only eighteen years of age, and is without money or 
means to pay the fine; that when he aided his mother in enticing away the boy 
which he was charged with kidnaping, he honestly believed the boy to be Charley 
Ross, and that he was doing an act of humanity in enticing him away and return- 
ing him (or trying to) to his father. The treasurer, auditor, clerk and county 
superintendent of schools add their recommendation that I remit the fine. I have 
requested the recommendation of the judge and prosecuting attorney. The judge, 
in his reply, says : 

"In answer to which I have the honor to state that said Hindman was jointly 
indicted with his mother for the crime of kidnapping, and they were both tried 
before me and a jury. The evidence at the trial convinced me that John commit- 
ted the crime at the instigation of his mother. Both were found guilty, and the 
mother sentenced to the penal departmest of the Indiana Reformatory Insiitution 
for "Women and Girls. I learn from the sheriff that since his confinement in the 
county jail the conduct of John has been exceptionably good, and that he has no 
means nor friends to aid him to pay his fine. If he should remain in jail until his 
fine and costs were satisfied, it would cost Wayne county not less than one hundred 
and fifty dollars. For these reasons I think the remission of his fine would be an 
act of which no one would question the propriety." 

The prosecuting attorney concludes as follows : 

"I believe, under the circumstances, it would be right for you to remit the fine, 
if you desire to do so, and I hereby recommend that the same be remitted." 

The remission is granted. J. D. "W. 

20. To Isaac Mayfield the sum of eighty dollars, being the amount of foirr 
fines of twenty dollars each adjudged against him by the Jefferson Circuit Court, 
on the 19th day of September, 1877, upon his conviction of selling liquor contrary 



147 

to law. Kemission granted June 27, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. In support 
of the application the clerk, auditor, treasurer and sheriff of Jefferson county have 
given me their opinion that it would be proper for me to remit the unpaid fines. 
They say: 

"Our reasons for asking the above remission are that he had been heavily fined 
and already paid in fines and costs to the sum of two hundred and eighty dollars 
($280), and that the liquor was sold as a medicine, and not as a beverage; defend- 
ant so testified ; and for the additional reasons that said Mayfield is a good, worth j 
citizen of our county, and that since said fines were assessed he has refrained alto- 
gether from selling." 

The defendant was fined in nine cases, amounting to one hundred and eighty dol- 
lars. Upon proof of the payment of one hundred dollars, the residue will be re- 
mitted. J. D. W. 

Juhe 5, 1878. 

21. To William H. Baker and Mortimer K. Goodrich, each the sum of one 
bundred and sixty-five dollars, being the amount of a fine adjudged against him 
by the Ohio Circuit Court, on the 18th day of April, 1877, upon his conviction of 
failing as a director of a turnpike company to make out and publish an annual 
statement, as provided by law. Kemission granted July 29, 1878. Decision: By 
the Governor. An Act, approved March 9, 1875, (Acts of 1875, p. 79,) required the 
board of directors of every turnpike company " to cause to be made out during the 
first week in July of each year, commencing with July, 1875, a full and complete 
statement " of the assets and liabilities of the company, its capital stock, and its 
receipts and expenditures for the preceding year, the statement to be sworn to by 
the members of the board and attested by the clerk or secretary thereof, and "pub- 
lished within fifteen days after the first day of July in each year, in one newspaper of 
general circulation printed and published in each county into or through which any 
part of the road of such company may run, the same to be published two consecu- 
tive weeks in such paper." The second section made a failure or refusal of any 
officer to comply with the provisions of the act a misdemeanor, and declared that 
upon eonviction thereof they shall each "be fined in any sum not less than five or 
more than twenty dollars for each day that they shall so fail or refuse to comply 
with the provisions of this act." The act did not become a law until August 24, 

1875, so that compliance with its provisions became necessary commencing July, 

1876. The act was repealed by the act of March 13, 1877. The defendants and 
anether director were indicted in Dearborn county. Upon a change of venue, and 
trial by a jury in Ohio county, the judgment complained of was rendered. An 
appeal to the supreme court resulted in an affirmance. (See 57 Indiana Reports, 
page 255). I am asked to remit the fines. The application states that "they were 
found guilty of having failed to make such report for thirty-three days, and were 
each fined in the sum of $165 ; the time for which they failed to make such report 
being from the 16th day of July, 1875, until the 17th day of August, 1875." The 
indictment i6 set out in the decision of the supreme court and charges a failure to 
make the report "during the first week of July, A. D. 1876," a failure "to have 
said statement published within fifteen days after the 1st day of July, 1876," and 
a continued failure "until the 24th day of August, A. D. 1876." The last dates 
must be correct as there was no law to be violated in 1875. The application was 
received February 22, 1878. The officers of Ohio county hesitated to give the 
formal opinion required by statute, for the reason that the offense was committed 
in Dearborn county, and their knowledge was gained on the trial. They now ex- 



148 

press the opinion that it would be proper for me to remit the fines. In their letter 
submitting the application, defendants' counsel ask interposition in their behalf r 
solely on the ground that they were ignorant of the existence of the statute they 
were adjudged guilty of violating, and they submit affidavits of credible wit- 
nesses, showing that although bound to know the law, they first learned its require- 
ments in August, 1876, and at once proceeded to comply with them. Whether a 
eompliance was possible after July 15th, is questionable, but now unimportant. 
Whether the fines should not have been assessed for the fifteen days (less Sundays) 
ending July 15th, and not for the days subsequent, was a question for the courts. 

Hon. W. S. Holman, writes : 

"I was employed by citizens of Dearborn county to assist the prosecuting attor- 
ney in those cases. As the defendants were found guilty of failing to publish the 
financial statement, there was no discretion left with the jury as to the fines, and 
consequently the fines are quite severe. The citizens who employed me in the 
cases think that under all the circumstances the fines ought to be remitted, and I 
would suggest that in considering the question, the facts that the law was com- 
paratively a new law, and that Baker and his associates did publish the statement 
shortly after the time prescribed by the law, and that the offense was in fact, a 
technical one, might fairly be taken into the account." 

The judge says : 

" On the trial of the cause referred to by Judge Holman, Baker, the defendant, 
testified that, as a matter of fact, he did not know of the existence of the law under 
which he was prosecuted until after the expiration of the time within which he was 
required to publish the statement, and that he made out and published the state- 
ment required as soon as he learned the existence of the law. Erom a view of all 
the facts and circumstances revealed on the trial of the cause, I believe his evi- 
dence on that point was true, which should receive proper consideration in psssing 
upon his application for the remission of the fine assessed." 

I understand that the defendant, Goodrich, is without means, and that Baker r 
being his replevin bail,' must pay both judgments. No other fine for this offense 
has come to my notice. The other defendant was granted a new trial. It is 
proper that these be relieved. The remission is granted. J. D. W. 

22.«*To James Drake the sum of four hundred and fifty dollars, being the 
amount of a fine adjudged against him by the Tippecanoe Circuit Court, on the 
5th day of May, 1877, upon his conviction of the crime of malicious trespass. Re- 
mission granted August 2, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. This application waB 
made June 18, 1878, by the judge and prosecuting attorney. They said : 

" Said Drake has been confined in the jail of Tippecanoe county ever since his 
sentence; has paid no paTt of the fine or costs, and, so far as the knowledge of the 
undersigned extends, has no property whatever out of which any part of the same 
could be made. In the opinion of the undersigned, said Drake has been sufficiently 
punished, or at least no good purpose can be subserved by his further confinement 
in jail, and we respectfully ask that you remit said fine, so that he can be released 
from custody." 

In his accompanying letter, the prosecuting attorney says: 

He is a bad man, but we are punishing the county more_tban we are Drake by 
confinement." 



149 

The clerk of the court and the sheriff, treasurer and auditor of Tippecanoe coun- 
ty are of the opinion that it would be proper for me to remit the fine. They say : 

"Said Drake was convicted for a malicious trespass, in cutting what is commonly 
called the ham-strings of three horses, the property of a divorced wife. He wai 
fined by a jury four hundred and fifty dollars, and a judgment followed that he be 
imprisoned until the fine and costs should be paid or replevied. We respectfully 
ask the remission of said fine for the reasons that Drake has been sufficiently pun- 
ished, and no good purpose can be subserved by his further confinement in jail at 
the expense of the county." 

A protest of the divorced wife had been received more than one year before the 
application was made. The statute (2 G. & H., p. 421, sec. 130) authorizes the dis- 
charge of an execution defendant " after being imprisoned one day for every fifty 
cents of the fine," upon proof of his inability to pay or replevy the same. A simi- 
lar statute, applicable only to justices' judgments, (2 G. & H., p. 640, sec. 19,) pro- 
vides that " if such defendant do n@t immediately pay or replevy the same, the 

Justice shall commit him to jail, there to remain one day for each dollar of such 
fine so adjudged against him." A discharge under the statute "by the court or by 
the judge of any court," may not be granted until the expiration of nine hundred 
days from May 5, 1877. By the act of March 12, 1875, the sheriff is allowed "for 
boarding each prisoner lawfully in his charge, per day sixty cents, to be paid out 
of the county treasury." (Acts of 1875, special session, page 39.) In this case the 

■ expense to Tippecanoe county would be five hundred and forty dollars, or ninety 
dollars more than the fine, which would still be unpaid and uncollectible. In jus- 
tice to the county, I decided to remit the fine at the expiration of four hundred 
and fifty days' imprisonment. That time has now come. The remission is granted. 

J. D. W. 

23. To "Watson W. Pryor, the sum of twenty dollars, being the amount of a 
fine adjudged against him by the Owen Circuit Court, on the 21st day of Decem- 
ber, 1877, upon his conviction of unlawfully selling intoxicating liquor. Kemis- 
sion granted August 13, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. This application is 
made by the judge of the court. He says: "Watson W. Pryor of this town 
[Spencer] was fined at the October term, 1877, of the Owen Circuit Court 401 sum 
of $20 for retailing intoxicating liquors. I respectfully request the remission of 
said fine. Mr. Pryor is a very bad cripple, the use of one leg being wholly and 
permanently lost. He has a large family dependent upon him for support, and 
needs even more than he can make to supply their wants. A contribution to the 
public by way of a fine will have to be refunded by the public in the way of char- 
ity. The prosecution of him has wrought all the beneficial effects that could be 
hoped for from it, as he has ceased selling liquor in any manner. I have no hesi- 
tancy in recommending the granting of his prayer and earnestly join in his 
request." Eight attorneys, two justices of the peace and other citizens add: 
" We, the undersigned, endorse the above statement and recommend its approval." 
The clerk of the court and the auditor, recorder, sheriff and treasurer of Owen 
-county, the prosecuting attorney, the township trustee and others express the opin- 
ion that it would be proper for me to remit the fine for the following reasons, to- 
wit: That the said Watson Pryor is a disabled man, having lost the use of one 
leg from a protracted case of white swelling; said Pryor has a large family de- 
pending on him for support, and is using every means honorably to prevent himself 
and family from becoming a public charge; said Pryor has wholly ceased trading 



150 

in liquors and is a respectable and quiet citizen. Believing that it is an act of 
charity and for the public good, we pray your Honor to remit said fine." The re- 
mission is granted. J. D. W. 

24. To George Klein the sum of ten dollars, being the amount of a fine ad- 
judged against Frederick Umback, by the Jefferson Circuit Court, on the 4th day 
of September, 1877, upon his conviction of selling intoxicating liquor in violation 
of law, for the payment of which he became replevin bail. Remission granted 
August 22, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. This application is made by officers 
and citizens of Madison and Jefferson county, and shows that " the said Umback 
has since died insolvent, and the replevin bail, George Klein, is an old man in re- 
duced circumstances, owning nothing but a small house and lot, and supported by 
a son, a young man who is a day laborer at small wages." The judge writes : 

"Mr. Klein is a worthy, good citizen, but is broken down in health, and is poor,, 
and if he is compelled to pay the fines of Umback, for whom he was surety, it 
would impoverish him in his old age. I feel free to say that it is a case where 
your Excellency can do him a great favor and do no one any wrong. His petition 
is signed by almost all the county officers, and he could get almost every citizen of 
the county to sign his request, but I told him it was not necessary." The clerk,, 
auditor, recorder, sheriff and treasurer of Jefferson county have given me their 
formal opinion that it would be proper for me to remit the fine for reasons stated^ 
The surety makes oath that "he has received no indemnity, and is fully satisfied 
that there are no means of future indemnification, as said Umback is deceased, and 
his estate is hopelessly insolvent." The remission is granted. J. D. W. 

25. To Ernest Harmes, the sum of fifty dollars, being the residue of five 
fines of twenty dollars each, adjudged against him by the Lake Circuit Court, on 
the 20th day of November, 1877, upon his conviction of selling intoxicating liquor 
in violation of law, he having paid fifty dollars. Remission granted August 30, 
1878. Decision: By the Governor. This application is made by citizens of Valpa- 
raiso and Tolleston and the county officers of Lake county, and the prosecuting 
attorney. They say: " Mr. Harmes was fined one hundred dollars on five indict- 
ments found against him in the Lake Circuit Court for retailing intoxicating 
liquors in less quantities than a quart at a time, to be drunk upon the premises, and 
were imposed by the judge of the Lake Circuit Court at the February term, 1878- 
Wc ask that said fines be remitted for the following reasons, to-wit. That Harmes 
is a poor man and unable to pay the fines and cannot pay any sum further than the 
costs without distressing him, and that he proposes to quit the business of a retail 
dealer in intoxicating liquors." Senator Skinner says: "The petition in behalf 
of Ernst Harmes, who was fined in Lake county for non-compliance with the 
terms of the law regulating the sale of liquors, is one deserving your especial at- 
tention and clemency. The facts set forth in his behalf are true, being within my 
knowledge. Besides, Mr. Harmes is an excellent citizen and deserves well of those 
who can render him a service." The county officers have given me their formal 
opinion that it would be proper for me to remit the fines. I decided that upon 
proof of the payment of fifty dollars, I would remit the residue and, that proof 
being now made, by the certificate of the clerk, the remission is granted. 

J. D. W. 

26. To Adolphus Shaffer the sum of one hundred dollars, being the amount. 
of a fine adjudged against him by the Marion Civil Circuit Court, on the 14th day 
of May, 1877, upcn his conviction of a contempt of court. Remission granted Sep- 



151 

tember 11, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. It is usual to interfere in cases of this 
nature only upon recommendation of the judges who imposed the fines. This 
application was received September 4, 1878, and is signed by Judge Julian. As 
the nature of the contempt was not shown, I requested of the judge a statement of 
the facts of the case. In his reply, he says: 

" The facts are that Shaffer, while the case of Patterson vs. Brandt and others 
was on trial in my court, proposed to one of the jurors to pay him twenty-five dol- 
lars, or, at any rate, said to him he could get that sum if he would cause the jury to 
disagree as to tbeir verdict. A good deal was said between them, but the substance is 
stated above. The juror exposed him, and along with the $100 fine I sent him to 
jail for, 1 believe, thirty days. He was confined the whole, or a large part, of the 
time. The case created some excitement at the time, and the prompt recognition 
and punishment of the offense had a most salutary influence. I have by no means 
•hanged my opinion as to the conduct of Shaffer; but, in view of the fact that the 
end to be accomplished by the punishment has been reached, and of the fact 
that he is a poor man with a family dependent on him, I recommend a remission 
©f the fine." 

A copy of the judgment is filed with the application, and shows that, in addition 
to this fine, the defendant was committed to jail for thirty days. The treasurer, 
aheriff, and auditor of Marion county are of the opinion that it would be proper for 
me to remit the fine. The remission is granted. J. D. W. 

27. To William Kennett the sum of ten dollars, being the amount of a fine 
adjudged against him by the Decatur Circuit Court, on the 6th day of December, 

1877, upon his conviction of public indecency. Kemission granted September 16, 

1878. Decision: By the Governor. In July last the prosecuting attorney wrote: 

"At the December (1877) term of our Circuit Court, a boy about sixteen years 
of age by the name of William Kennett was fined, upon a plea of guilty, ten dol- 
lars for indecently exposing his person. His mother and step-father were unable 
to pay or replevy the same, he not being a freeholder. They induced a friend of 
theirs, by promise that he should be harmless, to replevy it. It is now reduced to 
a certainty that, if it is ever paid, the bail, Thomas N. Brown, must do it. Brown 
is a laboring man, a brick mason, not worth, probably, over five hundred dollars; 
has had very severe sickness in his family, and I respectfully submit that the State 
oan better afford to lose this than that Brown should pay it, and I therefore ask you 
to, remit the same." 

The judge added : 

" I fully concur in the above statement and request." 

The application was suspended to await the opinion of the county officers, re- 
quired by statute. The clerk of the court, the auditor, sheriff, treasurer and re- 
corder, and other citizens of Decatur county, are now of opinion that it would be 
proper for me to remit the fine, and "join the application of the judge and prose- 
cuting attorney, on file, and ask it to be remitted." 

The remission is granted. J. D. W. 

28. To Nicholas Shaeer, the sum of seventy dollars, being the amount of 
seven fines of ten dollars each adjudged against him by the Jennings Circuit 
Court, on the 24th day of May, 1878, upon his conviction of selling intoxicating 
liquor to minors. Kemission granted September 25, 1878. Decision: By the Gov- 



152 

ernor. This application is made by citizens of Spencer township, Jennings county. 
They say : " Mr. Shafer has been confined in jail for about four months, and during 
that time he has suffered terribly. He is a cripple, is now in poor health, and has 
a wife and family depending upon the public charity for support. We are reliably 
informed that Mr. Shafer was imposed upon by the minors to whom he sold the 
liquor for which he was fined, and, as he is wholly unable to pay his fine and cost, 
or any part of it, we'beg his pardon at your hands. He is a citizen of this neigh- 
borhood, and is well known to us and has always borne the reputation of a peacea- 
ble, orderly and well-disposed citizen. The clerk of the court and the sheriff, aud- 
itor, treasurer and recorder of Jennings county are of the opinion that it would 
be proper for me to remit the fines "for the following reasons, to-wit: FirsL 
Because the said Shafer has been confined in jail ever since the said 24th day of 
May, 1878, and has been sufficiently punished for the offenses he has committed. 
Second. Because he is wholly unable to pay said fines or any part thereof, and to 
keep him longer in jail will be to add additional cost and expense to the county. 
Third. Because said Shafer has a family wholly dependent upon him for support, 
and is now being supported by the township trustee of said county. Fourth. 
Because said Shafer is a cripple and unable to perform manual labor, and was driven 
to the selling of intoxicating liquors for that reason." I am otherwise reliably in- 
formed that Shafer " is in poor health by reason of long confinement, and that his 
wife has, within the last few days, been confined, and is now in a precarious condi- 
tion." The prisoner must remain in jail one hundred and forty days to entitle 
him to a discharge by the court under the statute giving him a credit of fifty cents 
for each day's imprisonment. He has now served one hundred and twenty-five 
days. The remission is granted. . J. D. W. 

2b. To Orlando B. Dicks the sum of two hundred dollars, being the residua 
of a judgment for four hundred dollars rendered against him by the Putnam Cir- 
cuit Court, on the 18th day of February, 1878, upon a forfeited recognizance where- 
in be was bound as surety for the appearance in said court of Charles Dicks, to 
answer a charge of assault and battery with intent to murder, two hundred dollars 
having been paid on the judgment. Kemission granted October 11, 1878. Decis- 
ion : By the Governor. This application is made by officers and citizens of Putnam 
county. They say : 

"That about the 21st day of May, 1877, one Charles Dicks, who had theretofore 
resided in this county, started on his way removing from his former home here to 
the State of Kansas, and [for] that purpose left his home, some thirteen miles south 
of Greencastle, intending at that place to go by railroad to his destination, there 
permanently to reside. At Greencastle he purchased at the depot of the Indianapo- 
lis & St. Louis "Road a ticket from that place to the town of Charleston, 111., and sub- 
sequently, but on the same day, became very much intoxicated, and in that condition 
went upon the passenger train, and in a short time thereafter was called upon for 
his fare by the conductor, and, not finding his ticket in the pocket where he sup- 
posed he had put it, he alleged that he had paid his fare. Words grew up over it, 
and the conductor, with the assistance of his brakeman, took [hold] of him and by 
force put him off the train, when he drew his pistol and fired it off at the brake- 
man, inflicting a slight wound in the leg or foot. For this offense he was appre- 
hended by the conductor in Putnam county, and imprisoned on the cars until the 
train reached the city of Terre Haute, in Vigo county, and there imprisoned in the 
calaboose, that was in a filthy condition, until the conductor returned there, when 
he was returned back to Greencastle and indicted, charged with an assault and bat- 
tery with intent to commit murder, when your petitioner, Orlando B. Dicks, who 



153 

is the brother of the said Charles Dicks, at the instance of his mother, who is a 
widow woman, became the cognizor of said Charles in the penal sum of four hun- 
dred dollars for his appearance here at the November term of the Putnam Circuit 
■Court; but, before the time of trial, fled and left the country to parts unknown. 
Said recognizance was forfeited, and judgment rendered against said Charles and 
the said cognizor for the full amount of said penalty and costs." 

They further say that the surety is a single man, living with his mother, and 
that the means to pay the judgment must be furnished by her. They,ask that one- 
half the judgment be remitted. The treasurer, sheriff, recorder, clerk and auditor 
are of opinion that it would be proper for me to remit one half. The surety makes 
oath that neither he nor his mother has been indemnified in any amount by the 
principal or any other person. The clerk certifies that two hundred dollars and 
the costs in full have been paid on the judgment. The residue will be remitted. 

J. D. W. 

30. To William Kose, the sum of one hundred and seventy dollars, being the 
amount of three fines — $100, $50 and $20— adjudged against him by the Hamil- 
ton Circuit Court, on the 29th day of April, 1878, and the 7th day of September, 
1878, upon his conviction of selling intoxicating liquor in violation of law. Kemis- 
sion granted October 12, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. The defandant in his 
application says that at the time of the assessing of the fines, and ever since, he has 
been in such indigent circumstances that it has been, and is now, utterly impossible 
for him to pay or replevy the fines or any part of them, or cause the same to be 
done, and, having been incarcerated in the jail of Hamilton county since the date 
of the judgments, he now asks a remission that he may be discharged. He says 
that he has a wife and four helpless children depending on him for support and 
that they are now in very destitute and suffering circumstances from want of 
proper care and attention from him, such as he could and would give them if 
released from jail. The clerk, sheriff, auditor, treasurer, recorder, county superin- 
tendent and prosecuting attorney, are of the opinion that a remission of the fines 
will be proper and right, and request that they be remitted. 

The Judge writes : 

" I would say that neither of the cases were aggravated and that, in my opinion, 
the punishment has already been sufficient, and that it would be to the best interest 
of the State and all parties concerned, that he be released. "Wherefore, I respect- 
fully pray your Excellency to remit the fines in each of the above cases." 

The remission is granted. J. D. W. 

31. To William Campbell, the sum of eight hundred dollars, being the residue 
of a fine of one thousand dollars adjudged against him by the St. Joseph Circuit 
Court, on the 4th day of April, 1878, upon his conviction of an assault and battery, 
two hundred dollars having been paid on the judgment. Kemission granted Oc- 
tober 22, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. Upon conviction, Campbell was sen- 
tenced to six months in the county jail, and adjudged to pay a fine of one thousand 
dollars. Application for pardon and remission was made July 24, 1878. Citi- 
zens of Niles, Michigan, testified to the prisoner's good character while resident 
there. The clerk, sheriff, treasurer, recorder, surveyor, and the county commis- 
sioners of St. Joseph county and some of the jurors expressed the opinion that it 
would be proper for me to pardon the defendant and remit his fine for the fol- 
lowing reasons: 

M First. The punishment was severe, the fine being heavy; Second. He is unable 



154 

to pay the fine; Third. He has now been imprisoned for about three uaontha. 
Fourth. If compelled to remain in jail until his fine shall be satisfied by lapse of 
time, his imprisonment would last a long time, would not reform him, and would 
put the tax-payers of the county to great expense. Fifth. We are informed that 
this is the first offense in this or any other State of which Campbell has been 
found guilty, and therefore consider that he should not be as severely dealt with 
as if he had been an old offender ; defendant to pay costs." 

The auditor, in a separate statement, said : 

"In my opinion, he should be pardoned, and all of the fine except the sum of 
four hundred dollars should be remitted." 

These opinions were supported by recommendations of citizens of the county. 
The judge certified to me a statement of the substance of the evidence. 

The prosecuting attorney, in reply, said: 

"I will say that the charge against him wns assault and battery with intent to 
commit murder, and the act done was shooting a revolver into a crowd of people 
assembled in a bar-room connected with the dancing hall of the South Bend Turn- 
verein. The case was thoroughly tried by a jury composed of good, substantial 
citizens of St. Joseph county. The prisoner was defended by able counsel, and the 
verdict as favorable to him as could be hoped for under the circumstances of the 
case. His motion for a new trial was fully discussed or argued by his counsel, and 
the court refused to disturb the verdict. I do not think Mr. Campbell a bad man, 
only wild and somewhat reckless of consequences when under excitement. The 
fine was, perhaps, large for a man in his circumstances, but I do not think he 
should be discharged from custody until a portion of it, and the costs, are paid. 
The latter amount to about one hundred dollars. A settlement has been made 
with the injured man, and he has been given a note for $245, payable six months 
after a pardon is granted and the whole fine remitted. I think that note ought to 
be paid, and at least $200 of the fine and the costs, or, if the note is not paid, that at 
least one-half of the fine should be paid before he is discharged." 

The judge replied: 

"While I have no doubt in my own mind as to the justness of the conviction of 
Campbell, and while the jury might with eminent propriety, under the evidence 
have found him guilty of the graver offense of intent to murder, and if they had 
done so I could not have disturbed their verdict, yet the papers Mr. Anderson 
has filed with you for a pardon are certainly entitled to the highest consideration 
and respect. I in no way feel inclined to interpose objections to the wishes of 
so large and eminently respectable a number of citizens, and should consider it 
highly proper to grant their request." 

I declined to grant a pardon, but said that upon payment of one-half the fine the 
residue would be remitted. The condition was not accepted. The term of impris- 
onment expired on the 4th instant. On the 14th, I decided that upon payment of 
two hundred dollars I would remit the residue. It now appears from a certificate 
of the clerk that payment has been made as required. The remission is granted. 

J. D. W. 

32. To Atjrelitjs Smith, the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, being the 
amount of a fine adjudged against him by the Vanderburgh Circuit Court, on the 
6th day of June 1878, upon his conviction of the crime of assault and battery. 



155 

Bemission granted .November 1, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. A certified 
copy of the judgment received with the application October 15, 1878, shows that 
the defendant was adjudged guilty, and sentenced to bo imprisoned in the county 
|ail ninety days and pay this fine, his term of imprisonment to run from May 15, 
1878, the time of his trial. He had been confined in jail about one month before 
he was tried. A remission of the fine was asked by citizens of Vanderburgh 
county. The judge, prosecuting attorney and clerk of the court and the sheriff, 
recorder, treasurer and auditor of the county, expressed the opinion that the fine 
ihould be remitted because of the defendant's previous good character, his inabil- 
ity to pay the amount and because the punishment already suffered is sufficient I 
offered, upon payment of fifty dollars, to remit the residue. I am since assured 
that the prisoner can pay no part, that he is even destitute of proper clothing, and 
that the county is being put to needless expense. The remission is granted. 

J.D. W. 

83. To Abraham W. Porter the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, being 
the residue of a judgment for three hundred dollars rendered against him by the 
Martin Circuit Court, on the 5th day of November, 1878, upon a forfeited recog- 
nizance wherein he was bound as a surety for the appearance of Samuel M. 
Donahey to answer a charge of grand larceny, he having paid one hundred 
and fifty dollars. Kemission granted November 11, 1878. Decision: By the Gov- 
ernor. On the 6th instant I received the opinion in writing of the clerk, auditor, 
nheriff and treasurer of Martin county, and the prosecuting attorney that it would 
be proper for me to remit the judgment. In conclusion they say: 

"That the property alleged to have been taken were some sheep that were found 
in the possession of the said Donahey, and it is supposed the real guilty parties are 
•till at large, and that the guilty ones have combined to saddle the crime upon 
him for their protection." 

I was otherwise informed that the aged father of Donahey gave his word to Dr. 
Porter that he should meet with no loss because of his suretyship for his son* In 
a letter to a friend who came to present the application, the father says: 

u Please do the best you can for me. I am not able to do any work, pained with 
rheumatism and can't do my feeding ; no one to help me ; sixty-eight years of age 
and can't pay that bond without selling my little farm, and that I can't d© at this 
time. If I could, I would not ask his Honor to help me. So, if such can be done^ 
I shall be forever thankful to all my friends." 

Judge Niblack says : 

"From what I have heard of this case and knowing the parties as I do, I regard 
the case as merely a technical one, and would be greatly pleased to see the for- 
feiture remitted." 

I proposed that upon payment of one-half the judgment, and the filing of an 
affidavit that the principal has given no indemnity, I would remit the residue. 
Payment of one hundred and fifty dollars has been made to the clerk. The surety 
makes oath that the principal never gave him anything whatever to indemnify 
him for any loss he may sustain by reason of being security on said bond. The 
remission is granted. J. D, "W. 

84. To James Lucas, the sum of twenty-five dollars, being the residue of three 
fines — $20, $10 and $20 — adjudged against him by the Clay Circuit Court, on the 
27th day of May, 1878, upon his conviction of selling liquor in violation of law, 



156 

twenty-five dollars having been paid on the judgments. Kemission granted 
December 11, 1878. Decision: By the Governor. This application was made Aug- 
ust 28, 1878, by citizens of Clay county who say, that the defendant is a good, 
quiet, respectable citizen, is an old man and unable to pay the fines without great 
hardship to him, as he is poor, that the prosecutions were instigated by malice and 
that, while there was a technical violation of the law, they are assured that there 
was no violation intended by Mr. Lucas at the time of the sale of the liquors- 
Citizens of Staunton, by petition, show that the defendant is a careful, prudent 
business man, who would not violate the law intentionally, and that they believe the 
prosecution to be wilful and unjust, prompted by political malice. The offense was 
selling spirituous liquors without having a license so to do. The judge, in reply 
to my letter asking his opinion and recommendation, wrote that he had no recol- 
lection of the cases and could not give an opinion. The county officers have sign- 
ed the application and the treasurer and sheriff have added a formal opinion that 
" the fines assessed against James M. Lucas for selling spirituous liquors, as it was 
prompted by political malice and prejudice, should be remitted." I decided Sep- 
tember 11, 1878, that upon the payment of one-half the amount of the fines I 
would remit the residue. Such payment is now shown by the clerk's certificate. 
The remission of the residue is granted. J. D. W. 



The State of Indiana, 
Office of the Secretary of State. 

I, John E. Neff, Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, do hereby certify 
that I have carefully compared the foregoing transcript with the records of par- 
dons, commutations and reprieves, and of remissions of fines and forfeitures kept 
in my office, and have found the several cases therein given to be correctly stated; 
and, further, that said transcript is a full, true and complete showing of all par- 
dons, commutations and reprieves, and of all remissions of fines and forfeiture* 
granted by the Governor during the two j'ears ending December 31, 1878. 

In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of 
the State, at the city of Indianapolis, this 2d day of January, A. D. 1879. 
[seal.] JOHN E. NEFF, 

Secretary of State. 



APPENDIX. 



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170 



CRIMINAL STATISTICS. 



Table showing the number of prisoners in the Indiana State Prison on the 80th 
day of November, each year since its establishment; the number received during 
each year, and the number discharged by expiration of sentence, by pardon, by 
death, by escape and by reversal of judgment by the Supreme Court. From the 
i' Third Annual Keport of the Warden of the Indiana State Prison to the General 
Assembly, Deeember, 1848." Documentary Journal, 1848, part 2, (Doc. No. 3) 
page 90. 



TEAKS. 


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W 


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u 

£3 
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CO 

> 

© 

c« 

a 
a 

a 

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1822 


1 
3 
18 
27 
40 
18 
21 
27 
20 
32 
31 
31 
25 
31 
35 
35 
25 
50 
51 
66 
42 
43 
60 
63 
58 
59 
63 


3 
12 
17 
24 
17 
10 
16 
10 
12 
10 
14 
22 
12 
15 
20 
12 
20 
10 
30 
27 
30 
26 
18 
34 
33 


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3 
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7 

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1 

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3 
8 
7 
5 


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6 

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1 
1 
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8 
2 
7 
2 
3 
4 
6 
2 
4 
5 


l 

3 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

1 . 


l 


1823 


4 


1824 


17 


1825 


31 


1826 


48 


1827 ; 


38 




33 




42 


1830 


35 


1831 


46 




54 




65 




61 
55 




67 




61 


1838 


49 




71 


1840 


88 


1841 


125 




124 




103 


1844 


92 


1845 


108 


1846 


128 


1847 


132 


1848 


140 






Total 


875 


460 


206 


78 


78 


13 


140 







Xeceived to December 1, 1848 976 

Number remaining 140 

Number who died 78 

Number escaped 78 

Number granted new trials 13 309 

Total discharged 666 

Total pardoned 206 

being more than one out of four, and nearly one out of three, discharged from im- 
prisonment. 



171 



TABLE 

Showing the number of prisoners received into and discharged from the Indiana 
State Prison from December 1, 1848, until December 15, 1861, compiled from 
incomplete published reports. 



YEAB. 


9 

> 

"3 

O 

eg 
« 


s 

M 
a 


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a 

m 

s 


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8 

s 

■8 

a 


1 


"3 
1 


J3 
IO 

6 

1 

to 
a 

a 
"3 

a 


1849 „. 


45 
93 
102 
104 
142 
141 
139 
152 
169 
298 
272 
269 
172 


1 
1 
1 

7 
2 
3 
3 

12 
8 
6 
5 


31 

28 

21 

46 

66 

74 

61 

81 

90 

95 

116 

160 

107 


8 
16 
16 
14 
21 
17 
15 
20 
36 
44 
57 
66 
32 


12 

35 

7 

5 

7 

7 

13 

7 

2 

6 

10 

10 

4 


2 

3 

8 

15 

20 

3 

13 

11 

1 

16 

19 

9 

10 


i 
i 
i 

i 

26 
36 
9 
3 
6 
7 
9 
6 






185 
225 
245 
297 
866 
394 
409 
426 
473 
651 
764 
831 
668 


54 

83 

53 

80 

115 

127 

138 

122 

132 

167 

208 

445 

359 


131 


I860 






14ft 


1851 






192 


1862 






?17 


1863 


?51 


1854..... 






7167 


1855 






?71 


1856 






804 


1857 






341 


1858 






484 


1859 






firm 


1860 


189 
200 


• 2 


386 


1861 


204 







172 



TABLE 

Showing the number of prisoners received into and discharged from the Indiana 
State Prison South from December 15, 1861, until October 31, 1878, compiled from 
incomplete published reports. 



YEARS. 






> 

'53 
o 

B> 

M 


d 

1 


-a 

1 

o 

.a 


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a 

p-i 


s 


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ft 
03 

a 

H 


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1-8 


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o 

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8* 


3 

a 

5 

T3 
si 

^d 
« o 

5 


"3 
1 


"3 
o 


tab 

P 

"3 
•3 

a 
2 


1862 


99 
146 

92 
161 
260 
203 
173 
173 
160 
175 
165 
183 
230 
114 
251 
287 
335 


i 

3 

1 
1 

4 
8 
1 
2 
3 


75 
57 
66 
73 

87 
99 
146 
134 
135 
111 
112 
150 
127 
70 
192 
172 
240 


13 

8 
9 
24 
35 
73 
20 
43 
30 
43 
26 
27 
24 
5 
34 
33 
44 


2 

5 

11 

7 

4 

19 

15 

4 

7 

13 
3 
13 
23 
4 
6 
7 
7 


3 
7 
4 
2 
5 
2 
6 
2 
1 
6 
7 
2 
6 
1 
3 

2 


7 
26 
6 
4 
5 
8 
1 
2 
2 
4 
5 
2 
15 
6 
4 
8 
6 






303 
350 
342 
407 
557 
624 
597 
579 
552 
564 
556 
594 
614 
595 
762 
810 
925 


100 
103 

96 
110 
136 
201 
192 
187 
182 
177 
153 
211 
197 

87 
239 
220 
299 


203 


1863 






247 


1864 






248 


1865 






297 


1866 






421 


1867 






423 


1868 




4 
2 

7 




405 


1869 




392 


1870 




370 


1871 




387 


1872 








403 


1873 




2 
1 


17 


383 


1874.. * 




417 


1875 




508 


1876 


523 


1877 






590 


1878 






626 











173 



TABLE 

Showing the number of prisoners received into and discharged from the Indiana 
State Prison North, from its estahlishment until October 31, 1878, including three 
hundred and eighty-nine received from the Prison South, as above stated. 



YEAE. 


CD 

> 

O 
C3 

<0 

M 


a 

A* 


PI 
o 

Ph 
a 

§° 


a 

s 


o 

O 
>. 

li 

Oh 


CD 
H 

Ph 
l» 

(D 

Ph 


f 


13 

8 


a! 
bo 

CD 

Ph 

"8 

P 
§ 

o 

a 

o 

H 


"3 

CD 

CD 

a <a 

fits 


"3 


"3 . 
1 


60" 

a 
"a 

'cS 

a 

CD 

P3 


1860 






189 
200 


23 

69 

95 

17 

25 

46 

36 

79 

62 

93 

97 

88 

94 

108 

125 

174 

205 

203 

282 


10 

21 

7 

8 

2 

6 

9 

15 

14 

21 

22 

21 

13 

24 

20 

31 

24 

29 

40 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

3 
2 


4 
13 
11 
11 
1 
6 
3 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 
4 
1 
1 


3 
3 
1 
3 
2 
2 
3 
4 
2 
4 
4 
6 
6 
2 
2 
4 
3 
7 
4 




2 

5 

42 


189 
364 
287 
142 
145 
178 
247 
381 
410 
465 
450 
413 
463 
518 
614 
734 
841 
900 
945 


42 

111 

156 

39 

31 

61 

52 

105 

92 

126 

132 

118 

122 

150 

159 

223 

238 

254 

340 


147 
253 


1861 


17 
34 
48 
42 
62 
130 
186 
132 
146 
109 
100 
168 
175 
244 
278 
329 
297 
299 




1862 


131 
103 
114 
117 


1863 






1864 






10 
2 
2 


1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
6 
2 
3 
6 
7 
13 
5 
12 
12 


1865 


2 




1866 




195 
276 
318 


1867 






1868 


2 
1 
2 
1 




1869 




339 


1870 




312 


1871 




295 


1872 




341 


1873 


2 
2 
1 
1 




368 


1874 




455 


1875 




511 


1876 




603 


1877 




646 


1878 






605 











Mem. — The foregoing tables were prepared in this office from incomplete flies of 
official reports and sent to the prisons for revision, correction and supplement. 
Each appears in its appropriate report (Prison South, table XI; Prison North r 
table A,) and is republished here for convenient reference and comparison. 

Governor's Office, January 9, 1879. 



174 



TABLE 

Showing the number of boys received into and discharged from the House of Refuge 
for Juvenile Offenders from its opening, January 1, 1868, to October 81, 1878, com- 
piled from incomplete and inaccurate reports. 



TEA3S. 


Si 

as 

5 ° 

°§ . 

s>£ a 
u 9.3 


a 

o 
O 

s a 


a> 

§g 

a o 

«i 
o 

O 


& 
M 

§ 

-a 

Hit) 

5 ® 

Q. 

« 


■?* 

Oo ft 

£.92 
o 


-a 

o 

1 

IS 

a 


•3 
a> 
P. 

M 
3 

w 


13 

s 


o 
H 


3 
8 


"S 

a 

3 

G 
"8 

a 

h 

a>2 


1868 


95 
28 
144 
37 
62 
80 
113 
153 
129 
117 
145 


12 


5 








3 


1 


112 
130 
262 
255 
260 
276 
339 
440 
484 
462 
499 


4 

21 

45 

59 

69 

59 

74 

112 

160 

123 

116 


108 


1869 


3 


20 

31 

56 

63 

55 

65 

103 

273 

116 

116 


1 

3 


118 


1870 






3 

2 
5 
4 

7 

7 

12 


8 
1 
1 

2 
2 
7 

7 


217 


1871 






1 
2 
5 
10 
18 
27 
20 
15 


196 


1872 






191 


1873 






216 


1874 






265 


1875 






328 


1876 






324 


1877 






339 


1878 










383 















175 



GENERAL STATEMENT. 



Whole number of boys admitted since opening 1,128 

Number in the institution October 31, 1878 339 

Number admitted during the year ending October 31, 1878 145 

Number returned during the same period 15 

Whole number in the institution during the year 499 

Number granted tickets-of-leave, etc 110 

Number dropped 6 

Number in the institution October 31, 1878 383 

Greatest number in the institution at any one time 383 

Mem. — The number received as convicted offenders is not separately given after 
1868; nor does the number of those pardoned appear, except for the year 1876, 
when three were pardoned. 



176 



TABLE 

Showing the number of women received into the Female Prison, and of girls 
received into the Keformatory, from its opening, September 12, 1873, and the num- 
ber discharged from each department of the Institution during that time, compiled 
from incomplete reports: 



FEMALE PKISON. 

Eeceived from Prison South, 1873 17 

Eeceived from Courts 102 

Total (including one re-committed) 119^ 

Discharged, (including three pardoned,) deceased, etc 74 

Eemaining October 31, 1878 45 



EEFOEMATOEY. 

Eeceived by commitments 292 

Discharged, released, died and escaped 143 

Eemaining October 31, 1878 149 



6 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THB 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



OF THB 



STATE OF INDIANA, 



FOB THB 



YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1878. 



TO THE Q-OATIEIEaiEsrOIEa. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL COMPANY, STATE PRINTERS. 

1878. 



I 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, 

Governor's Office. 

Received December 17, 1878, and referred to the Auditor of State for a verifica- 
tion of the financial statement on account of the Public Printing and Binding and 
Stationery. 

Returned by him certified as follows : 

Office of Auditor of State, 
Indianapolis, December 17, 1878. 

On examination of the records in this office, I find the financial statement of Pub- 
lic Printing and Binding to be correct. 

E. HENDERSON, 

Auditor of State. 

Examined by the Governor, and returned to the Secretary of State to be filed and 
preserved in his office, and published as ordered by the Commissioners of the Public 
Printing. 

SAMUEL R. DOWNEY, 

Secretary. 

Filed in my office December 19, 1878. 

JOHN E. NEFF, 

Secretary of State. 



To His Excellency, James D. Williams, 

Governor of Indiana : 

In compliance with the law denning the duties of Secretary of 

State, I have the honor to submit herewith the Annual Report of 

the business of this Department for the year ending October 31, 

1878. 

I am, most respectfully, yours, 

JOHN E. NEFF, 

Secretary of State. 



REPORT. 



GENERAL WORK. 

During the year there have been issued and attested two procla- 
mations, forty-eight warrants, sixty-two requisitions, one hundred 
and three pardons, thirty-eight remissions, six commutations, two 
respites, commissions to five hundred and eighty-eight State, 'Judi- 
cial, and County officers, thirteen hundred and fifty-two Justices of 
the Peace, and eight hundred and fourteen Notaries Public. 

PUBLIC PRINTING AND BINDING. 

The present contracts for public printing and stationery were 
made on the first day of July, 1877. From that date until the close 
of the fiscal year, ending October 31, 1878, (sixteen months,) there 
was paid on requisitions allowed by the Board of Commissioners of 
Public Printing and Binding the sum of $1,854.76 for stationery 
and $7,621.75 for printing and binding, as follows : 

PRINTING. 

On account Clerk's Office Supreme Court $462 91 

On account Superintendent Public Instruction 631 71 

On account Auditor of State ' 785 65 

On account Secretary of State 317 28 

On account Governor's Office 29 00 

On account State Library 69 75 

On account Attorney General 5 87 

On account Adjutant General 72 15 

On account Board Commissioners Public Printing ' 15 00 



6 

On account Reformatory Women and Girls $98 08 

On account State House Commissioners 172 41 

Printing Proceedings State Board Equalization, 1877... 72 87 

Printing Proceedings State Board Equalization, 1878... 72 42 

Printing Report of Secretary of State, 1877 278 06 

Printing Report of Treasurer of State, 1877 50 90 

Printing Report of Auditor of State, 1877 487 59 

Printing Report of Superintendent Public Instruction, 

1877 40 26 

Print 
Print 
Print 
Print 
Print 
Print 
Print 
Print 
Print 
Print 
Print 
Print 
Print 



ng Report of Hospital for Insane, 1877 90 79 

ng Report of Institute for Blind, 1877 55 '24 

ng Report of Institute for Deaf and Dumb, 1877 92 30 

ng Report of Female Reformatory, 1877 39 26 

ng Report of House of Refuge, 1877 39 33 

ng Report of Indiana Prison North, 1877 117 92 

ng Report of Indiana Prison South, 1877 75 72 

ng Report of State Normal School, 1877 20 83 

ng Catalogue of State Normal School, 1877-8 153 94 

ng Report of Purdue University, 1877 31 29 

ng Catalogue of Purdue University, 1877-8 172 97 

ng Report of Indiana University, 1877 23 34 

ng Catalogue of Indiana University, 1877-8 195 66 

Lithographing for Catalogue Indiana University, 1877-8 50 00 

Printing Report of Soldiers' Orphans' Home, 1877 31 06 

Printing Transactions Indiana Horticultural Society, 

1877 259 09 

Printing Report of State Board of Agriculture, 1877... 1,376 93 
Lithographing for Report of State Board of Agricul- 
ture, 1877 36 00 

Steel Engravings for Report of State Board of Agricul- 
ture, 1877 , 50 00 

Printing Briefs for Attorney General 14 27 

Engravings for Report of State Geologist 82 90 

Binding Documentary Journals, 1877-8 410 00 

Binding«Acts of Congress, 1877-8 199 00 

Advertising Enumeration Table in Daily Journal 166 00 

Advertising Enumeration Table in Daily Sentinel 176 00 

Total $7,62] 75 



STATIONERY. 

On account Clerk's Office Supreme Court $929 11 

On account Superintenden Public Instruction 150 31 

On account Auditor of State 277 17 

On account Secretary of State 201 95 

On account Treasurer of State 89 52 

On account Governor of State 43 39 

On account State Library 13 25 

On account Attorney General 32 88 

On account Adjutant General 11 49 

On account State House Commissioners 105 69 

Total Stationery $1,854 76 

Total Printing 7,621 75 

Total cost for sixteen months $9,476 51 

The total cost of the printing, binding and stationery, for the 
State, for the two years ending June 30, 1877, was $44,091.03; 
this makes the total cost, for the three years and four months, since 
the system was adopted of contracting the work, $53,567.54. In 
my Annual Report for the year 1875, I expressed the opinion that 
the entire cost of the printing, binding, and stationery for the State, 
for the two years then to come, would not exceed fifty thousand 
dollars. It will be seen from the above statement that the entire 
cost for the three years and four months has only exceeded that sum 
by less than three thousand dollars. 

INTERNAL IMPEOVEMENT BONDS. 

On the third day of last May a meeting was held of the board, 
as constituted by the act of December 12, 1872, for the redemption 
of the old Internal Improvement Bonds. This meeting was called 
for the purpose of examining and paying bond No. 283. Mr. John 
R. Wilson, attorney for the parties owning the bond, appeared 
before the board and demanded, in payment of the same, five thou- 
sand and thirty dollars and nineteen cents. This amount being the 
face of the bond and coupons, with interest at the rate of seven per 
centum to the date of presentation for payment. This amount the 
board refused to pay, and made the following order : 



8 

"Resolved, That the Auditor of State be authorized to issue his 
warrant on the Treasurer of State in payment of Internal Improve- 
ment Bond No. 283, as follows : 

On account of principal of bond $1,000 00 

Forty-one coupons, $25 each 2,025 00 

Interest on bond from maturity, July 1, 1861, to Febru- 
ary 13, 1873 697 00 

Interest on matured coupons to February 13, 1873 1,329 63 

Total $4,051 63 

In computing the interest the board was governed by a rule 
adopted upon payment of the first bond presented under the law, 
and under which all have heretofore been paid, viz : five per centum 
from maturity, until the thirteeth day of February, 1873. The 
amount tendered by the board was refused by the holders of the 
bond, who claim that the interest should be computed at the rate of 
seven per centum, that being the legal rate of interest at the place 
of payment, namely, the city of New York ; and that the interest 
should be computed up to the time of payment. 

Upon the refusal of the board to pay the amount demanded, a 
suit was instituted in the Superior Court of Marion county by the 
holders of the bond to enforce their claim, which is still pending in 
that court. The parties holding this bond are the holders of twenty- 
four others, and should the action now pending in the Superior 
Court result in their favor, suit will immediately be instituted on 
the other twenty-three bonds. 

The act of December 12, 1872, is silent upon the question of 
interest upon these bonds, and it is doubtful if it was the intention 
of the legislature to allow any interest, only intending by this ait 
to pay the face of the bonds and the coupons. 

PUBLIC LANDS. 

By an act, approved March 11, 1875, the Governor, Secretary, 
and Auditor of State, were authorized to sell and convey certain 
lands belonging to the State. These lands have been appraised and 
the following sold at their appraised value : 



9 

"The southeast, quarter of the southeast quarter of section six, 
township thirty, range three west, in Pulaski county ; also, one acre 
in out-lot number twenty-eight, in Clarksville, Clark county. The 
other tracts remain unsold, and owing to the depreciation in the 
value of real estate, since the appraisement was made, can not be 
sold at two-thirds of the appraised value; a reappraisement will 
have to be made before any of these lands can be sold. I desire to 
call attention to the condition of the title of the State to the tract 
described in said act as the northeast quarter of t^e northeast quar- 
ter of section one, township twelve, range seven west; also, one 
hundred acres in the southeast quarter of section one, township fif- 
teen, north of range two east, in Marion county, conveyed to the State 
by James P. Drake and wife. This one hundred acres was sold by the 
State to one Robert McCaslin, and a mortgage taken on it, and the 
forty acres first described, to secure the payment of the purchase 
money. Upon the failure of McCaslin to pay the purchase money, 
the mortgage was foreclosed, and the entire one hundred and forty 
acres bid in by the Governor for the State. Since the sale, and 
purchase by the Governor of the State, the lands have been sold for 
taxes that accrued during the time they were held by McCaslin, and 
purchased by Mrs. McCaslin, the wife of Robert McCaslin. Under 
this title Mrs. McCaslin now holds possession of these lands. No 
effort has been made to dispossess Mrs. McCaslin, for the reason 
that there is some doubt as to the title of the State, and especialy as 
to the forty acres first described. This doubt arises as to the power 
of the Governor to foreclose the mortgage, and purchase the lands 
under a decree of sale. The Legislature should pass an act legaliz- 
ing all the proceedings in the sale, foreclosure and purchase under the 
decree of foreclosure, and also directing the Attorney General to 
bring an action for the possession. 

DISTEIBUTION OF THE LAWS. 

The law providing for the printing, binding, and distribution of 
the session acts, house, senate, and documentary journals, should be 
amended. As the law now stands, the distribution in number to 
the counties is very unequal, as will be seen upon examination. In 
amending the law the distribution should be made on a basis of 
population, and not on a basis of the number of townships. 



10 

The present law provides that the Secretary of State shall con- 
tract with some responsible person to convey and deliver the acts 
and journals to the several persons, counties, and places designated 
by the law. This contract system should be abolished. The fact 
that all the counties, with a very few exceptions, can be reached by 
railroad transportation, does away with the necessity of contracting 
with any one to personally superintend the delivery. The distri- 
bution can be just as readily and as well done under the superin- 
tendency of the Secretary of State, and more cheaply. 

I would also recommend that a larger number of the acts be 
printed; and that they be distributed separately from the House 
and Senate Journals. As nearly all the laws go into force upon 
their distribution, they should be distributed as soon as possible. 
The delay in printing the House and Senate Journals has frequently 
prevented the distribution of the acts for weeks. If the law was 
so amended as to provide for the distribution of the acts separately, 
this delay can be avoided. 

By a joint resolution of the last General Assembly, the Gov- 
ernor, Secretary and Treasurer of State were directed to examine 
the claim of Benton county, for reimbursement for the extra- 
ordinary expenditures in the prosecution and conviction of James 
L. McCullough, for the murder of William C. Morgan, and report 
at the next General Assembly what portion, if any, of such claim 
should, in equity, be paid by the State. The history of this case, 
in brief, is as follows : 

About June, 1865, James L. McCullough, a former resident of 
Henry county, in the State of Indiana, while traveling through 
Benton county with one William C Morgan, a former resident of 
Grant county, in the State of Indiana, murdered said William C. 
Morgan, and secrected the body in a pond ; that, on the twenty- 
third day of December, 1867, the skeleton of Morgan was found; 
that, upon the suggestion of Hon. Conrad Baker, then the Gov- 
ernor of the State of Indiana, this county expended the sum of 
$229.15 in procuring an indictment, to be returned at the March 
term, 1868, of the Benton Circuit Court; that, neither the mur- 
derer or his victim had any relatives or acquaintances residing in 
Benton county; that, on the twenty-eighth day of January, 1873, 
the said McCullough was arrested in Henry county, Indiana, and 
confined in the jail of Benton county, whence he escaped on the 
night of February eighteen, 1873; and the County Commissioners, 
believing that the State would refund their extraordinary expenses 



11 

in that behalf, offered a reward for his apprehension, and incurred 
expense in capturing and keeping said prisoner, for trial, in the sum 
of $1,223.80; and upon the trial of said cause, the State was com- 
pelled to have witnesses from other states, and in securing their 
attendance and board, incurred an additional expense of $299.45, 
and the court allowed to defendant's attorneys the further sum of 
$500, making a total, not including any ordinary court expenses, ot 
$2,243.40. 

At the session of the General Assembly, of 1873, a petition was 
presented by a large number of citizens of Grant and adjoining 
counties for an allowance, to be used in the prosecution of said 
cause, and the matter was referred to the Governor, who assured 
the Prosecuting Attorney that if the prosecution was proceeded 
with carefully and successfully, that the Legislature would relieve 
Benton county of a part, at least, of the burdens incurred. The 
case was prosecuted carefully and successfully, and the defendant, 
McCullough, convicted and sentenced to the state's prison for life. 

When we take into consideration the promise made by the Gov- 
ernor, and also the fact that Benton county had no particular 
interest in the conviction of the defendant, over and above that of 
any other county of the State, it does seem to us just and equitable 
that the State should bear a portion of the expense. We would, 
therefore, most respectfully recommend that the following items of 
expense, incurred by said county, be paid by the State : 

Paid A. Cowgill, sheriff, expenses in procuring testimony 

from Wisconsin and Illinois $200 00 

Paid H. L. McHullery, sheriff of Henry county, for arrest 

and delivery 45 00 

Paid A. S. Ross, sheriff of Madison county, attaching wit- 
nesses 40 00 

Paid D. Waggoner, bringing convict from Northern In- 
diana State Prison to testify on trial 31 50 

Paid J. P. Harris, for boarding Martin and Catherine 

White, witnesses from Madison county 15 00 

Paid F. A. Stalkes, boarding Hearald, Crye, Blackstone and 

Roll, witnesses from Wisconsin and Illinois 17 20 

Paid Willis Harrold, witness from Wisconsin 50 00 

Paid Joseph Crye, witness from Wisconsin 50 00 

Paid U. P. Blackstone, witness from Illinois 25 00 

Paid Charles A. Roll, witness from Illinois 25 00 



12 

Paid Martin and Catherine White, witnesses from Madison 

county, Indiana $25 00 

One-half of the expenses of arresting after the escape 

from jail 450 00 

Total $973 70 

James D. "Williams, Governor. 
Benjamin C. Shaw, Treasurer of State. 
Jno. E. Neff, Secretary of State. ^ 

By agreement of the parties, the claim of J. H. Vrydaugh, 
against the Trustees of the State Normal School, was referred to 
the Governor, Secretary and Auditor of State for arbitration. The 
claim of Mr. Vrydaugh was for services rendered as architect of 
the State Normal School building. Upon an examination of all 
the facts, the arbitrators were of the opinion that the trustees had 
fully paid Mr. Vrydaugh for his services as such architect. 

I renew the recommendation that I have heretofore made : 

1. That the indexing and proof-reading of the House and Senate 
Journals be done under the supervision of this office. It would 
prevent much unnecessary delay, and largely reduce the expense. 

2. That' some provision be made for the recording of all articles 
of association filed in this office. It is impossible to prevent instru- 
ments of this kind from being abstracted from the files; and the 
only remedy for their preservation is to have them recorded. 

3. The establishment of a bureau of statistics in this office; 
and I ask a careful consideration of the bill presented in my report 
of 1876. 



APPENDIX 



15 



STATE OFFICERS. 



OFFICE. 


NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM 
EXPIRES. 
















Jan., 1881. 








Jan. 16, 1881 






Crawfordsville ,. , 


Jan. 25, 1881 






Feb. 9, 1881 




Thomas W. Woollen 




Nov 6, 1880. 




Ft. Wayne 


Mar. 15, 1881. 











UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 




Indianapolis. 









REPRESENTATIVES IN THE 
CONGRESS. 



FORTY-SIXTH 



NUMBER OF DISTRICT. 


NAME. 


P. 0. ADDRESS. 


First 








Thomas R. Cobb . 




Third 




New Albany. 


Fourth 




Fifth 






Sixth 






Seventh 




Indianapolis. 


Eighth 




Ninth 


Godlove S. Orth 

William H. Calkins 




Tenth 


Laporte. 


Eleventh 




Twelfth 




Ft. Wayne. 


Thirteenth 











16 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY— FIFTY-FIRST SESSION. 

SENATOES. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


SENATORIAL DISTRICT. 






Posey and Gibson counties. 






Vanderburg county. 












Spencer and Perry counties. 


F W Viehe 
















Martin, Orange and Dubois counties. 
Crawford and Harrison counties. 










Floyd and Clark counties. 


B H Burrell... 




Washington and Jackson counties. 


W B F. Treat ... 






"W F. Eeilev 








Scott, Jennings and Decatur counties. 












Switzerland, Ohio and Kipley counties, 
Decatur and Rush counties. 


















Caleb B. Tarlton 




Shelby and Johnson counties. 


W H. Ragan 










Parke and Vermillion counties. 












Tippecanoe county. 

Benton, Newton, jasper and White counties-. 
















Laporte county. 

St. Joseph and Starke counties. 




South Bend 








"Waller C. Olds 




Kosciusko and Whitley counties. 

Elkhart county. 

Noble and Lagrange counties. 






Elijah W. Weir 












Allen county. 




Ft. Wayne 










Hartford City 


Grant, Blackford and Jay counties. 














Tiptnn 


Hamilton and Tipton counties. 
















Randolph county. 
Wayne county. 














Fayette, Union and Rush counties. 

Marion county. 

Marion county. 

Marion and Morgan counties. 


A 1) Straight 




















Montgomery county. 







17 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY— FIFTY-FIRST SESSION. 
REPRESENTATIVES. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT. 






Posey county. 
Gibson county. 
Vanderburgh county. 
Vanderburgh county. 
Warrick county. 






















Tell City 


Spencer county. 
Perry county. 
Sullivan county. 












Samuel H. Taylor 




Daviess county. 














Paoli 


Crawford and Orange counties. 
Harrison county. 
Floyd county. 


D. A. Cunningham 

J. H.Wiliard 






William B.Carter 




Samuel H. Mitchell 


Beck's Mills 


Washington county. 

Jackson county. 

Lawrence county. 

Monroe county. 

Brown and Bartholomew counties. 

Jennings county. 

Scott, Jennings and Jefferson counties. 

Jefferson county. 

Ripley, Decatur and Rush counties. 

Ripley county. 


John T. Shields 






Bedford 


Robert W. .Miers 


























Rei 










Decatur county. 


George B. Sleeth 






Vigo county. 
Vigo county. 
Owen county. 


Robert Van Valzah 










Brazil 






Morgan county. 
Johnson county. 






Russell Allen 




Georire W. Snoddy 










Putnam and Hendricks counties. 


Robert Kelly 








Vermillion county. 

Parke and Montgomery counties-. 






A. R. Owen 






Attica 


Fountain county. 

Tippecanoe county. 

Tippecanoe county. 

Benton and Newton counties. 

Jasper and White counties. 

Lake county. 

Porter county. 

Laporte county. 

St. Joseph county. 

Marshall and St." Joseph counties. 

Kosciusko and Fulton counties. 

Fulton, Pulaski and Starke. 


Clark L. Baker 






Lafayette 




































John I>. Thaver 




Cvrus B.Tulley 


















Oscar B. Taylor 




Lagrange county. 










DeKalb county. 
Allen county. 
Allen county. 








Ft. Wavn« 




Bluft'ion 






Huntington county. 




Wal.ash 

Walash 




Huntington and Wabash counties. 
Grant and Blackford counties. 
Grant county. 






Oliver H. P. Carev 












Howard count v. 



2 — Sec. State. 



18 



REPRESENTATIVES— Continued. 



NAME. 



Benj.F. Campbell 

Chas. E. Scholl 

Thos. J. Lindley 

Wni. W. Rooker 

Frank D.Caldwell 

Joseph Davis 

J. Maurice Thompson.. 

Stanley W. Edwins 

Walter March 

John P. C. Shanks 

Enos L. Watson 

Nathan Harlan 

John H.Thornburg 

Chas. S. Hubbard 

Augustus C. Handy...., 

Exum Saint 

Joseph W Connaway. 

Wm. W.Herod 

John B.Connor , 

Chas. B. Robinson 

Jonathan W. Gordon . 

Will E.English 

Squire L. Vanpelt 

Alvin J. Alden 

B.H.Flodder 

Jas. D. Osborn 

Jas.M. Confer 

Geo. I. Reed 



RESIDENCE. 



REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT. 











Delphi 






Hamilton county. 

Hamilton and Tipton counties. 








Boone county. 
Montgomery county. 












Jay and Delaware counties. 
Randolph county. 
Wayne county. 
Wayne county. 
Henry county. 
Hancock county. 
























Marion county. 

Marion county. 

Marion county. 

Marion and Shelby counties. 

Shelby county. 








Shelbyville 






Franklin county. 

















19 






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21 



SUPREME COURT OF INDIANA. 

JUDGES. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






January, 1881. 
January, 1883. 
January, 1883. 
January, 1883. 
January, 1883. 






W E Niblack 

















CLEEK. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






November 13, 1880. 









EEPOETEE. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Bluffton 


January 13, 1881. 







22 



JUDGES OF THE CIRCUIT COURTS. 



NO. OF CIRCUIT. 


NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


First 


Wm. F. Parrett 




October 22, 1885. 








October 24, 1882. 


Third 






October 22, 1885. 


Fourth 






October 25, 1882. 


Fifth 






October 22, 1885. 


Sixth 


John G. Berkshire 




October 28, 1882. 






October 21, 1885. 


Eighth 


Samuel A. Bouner 
Nathan T. Carr 




October 24, 1883. 


Ninth 




October 22, 1885. 


Tenth 




Bedford 


October 22, 1885. 




Oscar M. Welborn 

Newton F. Malott 




October 24, 1885. 


Twelfth 




November 1, 1882. 


Thirteenth 




October 22, 1885. 




Chambers Y. Patterson 
Kendall M. Hord 




October 22, 1885. 


Fifteenth 




November 6, 1882. 




Shelbvville 


October 24, 1882. 








October 21, 1885. 




Robert L. Polk 




October 24, 1882. 




Thos. J. Terhune 
Thos. F. Davidson , , , 
Wm. P. Britton 




October 14, 1884. 






October 24, 1885. 






November 1,1882. 






October 21, 1885. 








October 24, 1882. 




Eli B. Goodykoontz 




October 19, 1885. 


Twentv-fjfth 




October 22, 1889. 






November 23, 1883. 
October 22, 18S5. 














October 28, 1885. 




Dudley H. Chase 

Edwin P. Hammond ... 
Elisha C. Field 




November 3,1884. 
October 22, 1885. 


Thirtieth 




Thirtv-first 




October 22, 1885. 








October 24, 1882. 


Thirty-third 






October 22, 1885. 


Thirtv-fourth 


Wm. A. Woods 




October 22, 1885. 


Thirty-fifth 






October 24, 1882. 


Thirty-sixth 


Nathan R. Overman ... 


Tipton 


October 24, 1885. 






October 24, 1S82. 


Thirty-eighth 


Edward O'Rourke 

John H. Gould 


Ft. Wayne 


October 24, 1882. 


Thirtv-ninth 


Delphi 


October 24, 1882. 




Sidney Keith 




October 24, 1882. 




Thos. L. Collins 




October 28,1884. 











JUDGES CRIMINAL CIRCUIT COURTS. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 


James E. Heller 




October 23, 1882. 


James W. Borden 


Ft. Wayne 


October 23, 1883. 


Thos. B. Long „ 




October 26, 1882. 







23 



SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 






October 24, 1880. 






October 28, 1882. 






October 28, 1882. 






October 28, 1880. 




October 28, 1882. 






October 28, 1882. 






October 28, 1832. 






October 28, 1SS2. 


Thos B Ward 




October 24, 1880. 






■ 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS FOR THE CIRCUIT 

COURTS. 



NO. OF CIRCUIT. 


NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Wm. H. Gudgel 




Oct, 22, 1881. 








Oct. 26, 1880. 




Wm. T. Zenor 




Oct. 25, 1880. 


Fourth.. . 


Thos. L. Smith 




Oct. 26, 1880. 


Fifth , 






Oct. 22, 1881. 


Sixth 


Wm. G. Holland 




Nov. 3, 1880. 








Oct. 26, 1880. 


Eighth . , 






Oct. 26, 1880. 


Ninth 






Oct. 22,1881. 


Tenth 




Paoli 


Oct. 22, 1881. 




Wm. H.Trippet 




Oct. 26, 1880. 


Twelfth 






Nov. 12,1880. 


Thirteenth 






Nov. 6, 1880. 




John T. Havs 




Oct. 24, 1880. 


Fifteenth 






Oct. 29, 18S0. 






Shelbvville 


Oct. 24, 1880. 








Oct. 26, 1880. 




Chas. M. Butler 




Oct. 22,1881. 




Richard B.Blake 




Oct. 26, 1880. 




Win. R.Moore 




Oct. 24, 1881. 








Oct. 26, 1880. 




Geo. W. Collings 




Nov. 3, 1880. 




Geo. W. Collins 




Nov. 7, 1881. 








Oct. 24, 1880. 


Twenth-fifth 






Oct, 26,1880. 








Oct, 26, 1880. 








Nov.3,18S0. 




Chas.W. Watkius 




Oct. 28,1881. 








Oct, 24, 1880. 


Thirtieth 






Nov. 3,1880. 


Thirtv-first 






Nov. 15, 1880. 








Oct. 22, 1881. 


Thirty-third 






Oct. 24, 1880. 


Thirty-fourth 






Oct. 22, 1881. 


Thirty-fifth 






Oct, 28, 1881. 


Thirty-sixth 




Windfall 


Oct. 26, 1880. 






Ft. Wayne 


Oct. 22, 1881. 






Oct. 22, 1881. 








Oct. 22, 1880. 








Oct. 24, 1880. 








Oct. 22, 1881. 











24 



CRIMINAL CIRCUIT PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS. 



NO. OF CIRCUIT. 


NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


TERM EXPIRES. 




Albert S. Kelly 




October 22, 1880. 




Ft. Wayne 


October 24, 1880. 






October 26, 1880. 









COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS. 



DATE OF 
COMMISSION. 



November 6, 1877... 
November 9, 1877... 
November 19, 1877. 
December 7, 187.7... 
December 10, 1877. 
December 14, 1877. 
December 17, 1S77. 

January 5, 1878 

January 9, 1878 

January 9, 1878 

January 11, 1878.... 
January 19, 1878.... 
February 6, 1878.... 
February 21,1878... 
February 21, 1878... 
February 21,1878... 
February 21,1878... 
February 22, 1878.. 
February 25, 1878.. 

March 1, 1878 

March 22, 1878 

March 23, 1878 

Aprill, 1878 .'.. 

Aprils, 1878 

April 12, 1878 

April 16, 1878 

May 1, 1878 , 

May 1, 1878 

May 6, 1878 

May 13, 1878 

Julv 3, 1878 

August 12, 1875 

August 20, 1S78 

August 21, 1878 

September 14, 1888 
October 22, 1878... 
October 22, 1878... 



Willard W. Cutler Morristown, N. J.. 

Thomas J. Hunt Philadelphia, Pa... 

Geo. M. Elwood Rochester, N. Y ... 

Henry J. Stratemeyer, Jr Elizabeth, N. J 

John A. Lipscomb Baltimore, Md 

Samuel Jennison, Boston, Mass 

N. Proctor Smith San Francisco, Cal.. 

Philip H. Hoffman Baltimore, Md 

Joseph S. Perot Philadelphia, Pa.. 

John A. Hillery New York, N. Y.... 

R. A. Watkins Little Rock, Ark.. 

Frank Saunders New York 

John K. Perley New York 

Henry E. Gorsed Philadelphia, Pa .. 

George T. Berll Baltimore, Md 

C. Ben. Johnson Wilkesbarre 

James Taylor. New York, N. Y.. 

Monroe Crannell Albany, N. Y 

Wm. J. Waterman Detroit, Mich 

John B. Thomas Cbicago, 111 

Marion Manchester New York, N. Y... 

G. E. Reardon Baltimore, Md 

Thos. B. Clifford New York, N. Y.. 

Chapman S. Chariot St. Louis, Mo 

Augustus Buckingham New York, N. Y.. 

Robert D. Johnson Galveston, Texas.. 

Wm Menzies Adams Brooklyn, N. Y.... 

James E. Temple Memphis, Tenn.... 

Joseph Frankish 1 Philadelphia, Pa.. 

Chas. N. West I Baltimore, Md 

C. D.Greene, Jr St. Louis, Mo 

John Sparhawk 

Louis Bickhardt 

Henry R. Dulany , 

Wm. B. Adams 

I. Spencer Smith , 

Edward Chatlin 



RESIDENCE. 



Philadelphia, Pa... 
New York, N. Y... 

Baltimore, Md 

Savannah, Ga 

Brooklyn, N. Y 

San Francisco, Cal.. 



OATH 
WHEN FILED. 



December 15, 1877. 
November 15, 1877. 
November 20, 1877. 
December 12, 1877. 
December 15, 1877. 
December 20, 1877. 
January 2, 1878. 
January 9, 1878. 
January 14, 1878. 
January 9, 1878. 

February 6, 1878. 

February 25, 1878. 
February 27, 1873. 

February 27, 1878. 
February 27, 1878. 
February 27, 1878. 
March 6, 1S78. 

March 27, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
April 8, 1878. 
April 19, 1878. 
March 4, 1878. 
March 6, 1878. 
March 1, 1878. 
March 15, 1878. 

July 3, 1878. 
August 19, 1878. 
August 26, 1878. 

September 20, 1878. 
November 5, 1878. 



25 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 



ADAMS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


November 1, 1883. 




Sheriff' 


November 11, 1880. 






September 5, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 








October 5, 1883. 


Aaron B. Tullis ... 




November 2, 1880. 


Gabriel F. Kintz 




November 2, 1880. 







ALLEN COUNTY. 



M. V. B. Spencer 

Charles A. Munson .. 

John M. Taylor 

Martin E. Argo 

Joseph Mommer, Jr.. 

William Gaffney , 

William H. Goshorn 



Clerk 

Sheriff... 
Treasurer 
Auditor.., 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor, 



November 3, 1882. 
November 6, 18S0. 
September 5, 1881. 
November 2, 1S82. 
June 15, 1884. 
November 14, 1881. 
October 25, 1880. 



BAKTHOLOMEW COUNTY. 



T. H. Hauzer 

William R. Spurgin 

Lewis A. Vogler 

Lewis Donhost 

David Stobo 

John Ph. Roesgen .. 
W. H. Redman 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner ... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 1883. 
November 4, 1880. 
August 1, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 1, 1883. 
October 27, 1880. 
October 27, 1880. 



BENTON COUNTY. 



Simon F. Coates 

T. K. Harmon .., 

Walter B. Hixson.... 

James S. Bradley 

Thomas A. Baldwin 
James H. Whitcomb 
James W. Wharry..., 



Clerk 

Sheriff".... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 2, 1882. 
November 4, 1880. 
August 15, 1881. 
November 4, 1880. 
October 27, 1880. 
November 4, 1880. 
November 2, 1880. 



26 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



BLACKFOKD COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 


Henry B. Smith... 


Clerk 


August 20, 1881. 




Sheriff 


August 24, 1881. 


Eli Hughes 




October 28, 1880. 




Auditor 


October 26, 1882. 




August 17, 1881. 






November 4, 1880. 






November 4, 1S80. 









BOONE COUNTY. 



Lindley M. Cox 

John H. Spahr 

George W. Norwood .... 
Thomas B. Williamson 

Sidney L. Pitzer 

E. W. S. Hilligoss 

Thomas W. Huckstep.. 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



October 23, 1880. 
November 2, 1880. 
September 24, 1881. 
November 11, 1883. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 4, 1880. 
October 30, 1880. 



BKOWN COUNTY. 



Eleokim Hamblen 

Stephen A. Kennedy 

Thomas Milnes 

Geo. W. Allison , 

Isaac Chafin 

William J.Long 

Leonidas S. Alder .... 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 1883. 
November 4, 1880. 
September 2, 1881. 
March 4, 18S3. 
November 12, 1880. 
October 31, 1880. 
October 28, 1880. 



CARKOLL COUNTY. 





Clerk 


November 1, 1883. 




Sheriff 








November 5, 1880. 






November 1, 1883. 






November 1, 1883. 






October 26, 1880. 















27 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



CASS COUNTY. 



NAME. 



NATURE OF OFFICE. 



WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 



Samuel L. McFaddin. 
Isaac Hemmelberger 

W.T.S.Manley 

Robert R. Carson 

John W. Maikley .... 

John W. Irons 

"Walter A. Osmer 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 5, 1880. 
August 21, 1883. 
September 9, 1883. 
November 1, 1882. 
August 18, 1883. 
October 2S, 1880. 
November 5, 1880. 



CLAEK COUNTY. 



Samuel C. Taggart 

Thomas Dillon 

Henry H. Ferguson.... 

Olam B. Gumsey 

Samuel H. McGonigal 

John J. Roos 

Dennis F. VVilley 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



February 24, 1884. 
August 22, 1881. 
September 5, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 
October 28, 18S0. 
October 28, 1880. 
November 5, 18S0. 



CLAY COUNTY. 



Elias C. Klimer , 


• 
Clerk 


November 16, 1880. 




Sheriff 


October 25, 1880. 






September 23, 18S1. 
October 25, 18S2. 










November 6, 1880. 


S.M.Stewart 




October 2S, 1880. 






November 10, 1880. 









CLINTON COUNTY. 



Edward Avery 

T.P.Holmes 

William Kelley 

Newton J. Gaskill 

John P. Dearth 

Charles M. Petty .. 
Elijah M.Amos.... 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 1883. 
October 14, 1880. 
November 5, 18S0. 
October 24, 1882. 
August 14, 1881. 
October 28, 1880. 
November 5, 1SS0. 



28 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



CRAWFORD COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


November 2, 1883. 




Sheriff 


November 11, 1880. 






August 24, 1881. 
November 2, 1880. 






Elijah Stroud 






William H Merratr 










November 5, 1880. 









DAVIESS COUNTY. 



Joseph Wilson Clerk 

Zachariah Jones I Sheriff 

Henry C.Brown I Treasurer. 

Thos. J.Lovelle ] Auditor ... 

Solomon Williams Recorder.. 

Elias Grace I Coroner.... 

Thos. J. Smiley j Surveyor.. 



March 10, 1880. 
August 25, 1881. 
August 5, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 
April 15, 1S83. 
August 25, 1881. 
November 1, 1880. 



DEARBORN COUNTY. 



Warren Tebbs 

Elijah Christopher 

William H. Kyle 

Alexander B. Pattison 

George C. Columbia 

Robert H. Davis 

S. M. Kennedy 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor .. 
Recorder. 
Coroner.., 
Surveyor. 



October 25, 18S2. 
November 5, 1S80. 
November 22, 18S8. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 5, 1880. 
November 28, 1880. 



DECATUR COUNTY. 



Evander T. Dyer 

Andrew J. Smith 

Henry C. Stockman., 

John L. Dobyns 

J. E. MendenhaU 

Amos W. Dowden.. 
Oscar L. Tulse 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor .. 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 1,1883. 
November 28, 1880. 
August 5, 1881. 
November 17, 1S83. 
November 1, 18S3. 
August 23, 1881. 
November 10, 1880. 



29 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



DeKALB county. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 






Sheriff 


November 10, 1880. 






October 28, 1880. 


Albert Bobbins 




Noveinber 5, 1882. 
















October 26, 1880. 

i 







DELAWARE COUNTY. 



A. L. Kerwooi Clerk 



John W. Dimgan.. 

Samuel Gibson , 

William H. Murray, 

James L. Streeter 

Wilber J. Koyden .... 
Levi G. Suffer 



Sheriff 

Treasurer . 
Auditor ... 
Recorder.. 
Coroner.... 
Surveyor.. 



November 23, 1883. 
August 26, 1S81. 
August 8, 1881. 
October 26, 1882. 
October 25, 1882. 
October 28, 1880. 
October 28, 1880. 



DUBOIS COUNTY. 



Peter J. Gossman 

George Cox 

Ignatz Eekert , 

Isidor Schuhacker.... 

John G. Lerning 

Michael Huehgesang 
Henry Berger 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



August 18, 1881. 
November 6, 1880. 
November 4, 1880. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 6, 18S2. 
November 25, 1880. 
November 25, 1880. 



ELKHART COUNTY. 



Thomas H. Daily 

C.J.Gillett 

Theodore F. Garvin 
Charles D. Henkle... 

Josiali W. Kronk 

Benjamin C. Dodge.. 
Henry Cook 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner..., 
Surveyor. 



November 5, 1882. 
November 5, 1880. 
November 3, 18S0. 
November 1, 1S83. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 5, 1880. 
November_5, 1S80. 



30 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



FAYETTE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


November 2, 1882. 




Sheriff 


November 2, 1880. 






September 3, 1881. 












October 28, 1880. 






November 6, 1880. 






November 2, 1880. 







FLOYD COUNTY. 



John B. Mitchell, 

John Hahn 

Frank S. Devol .. 
Thomas Hanlon.. 
Charles Swartzel 
Elijah Whitten... 
George M. Smith 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



FOUNTAIN COUNTY. 



November 1, 
November 6, 
September 8, 
November 1, 
Novembej; 1, 
November 6, 
November 1, 



1882. 
1880, 
1881 
1883, 
1882. 
1880, 
1880 



James L. Allen 

John M. Bailey 

Isaac Haupt 

Lewis Hanes 

Murphy Lewis 

Zachariah Ferguson 
M. H. Bever 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 29, 1882. 
October 22, 1880. 
August 15, 1881. 
October 25, 1882. 
October 25, 1882. 
December 28, 1880. 
October 25, 1880. 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 



William H. Bracken 
George B. Winscott . 
George F. Maxwell... 

John P. Schiltz 

W. H. Kerr 

Thomas Glidewell.... 
George W. Klepple . 



Clerk February 14, 1884. 

Sheriff November 6, 1880. 

Treasurer November 10, 1880. 

Auditor March 5, 1883. 

Recorder November 6, 1880. 

Coroner November 6, 1880. 

Surveyor November 6, 1880. 



31 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



FULTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


November 4, 1882. 


William A. Ward 


Sheriff 








September 5, 1881. 
March 4, 1883. 


Charles W. Coffyn 














November 4, 1880. 


Silas J. Miller 




March 4, 1881. 









GIBSON COUNTY. 



James S. Epperson.... 
William L. Hargrove 

John Sipp 

William J. Casey 

James M. Keys 

William Lockhart 

Alexander H. Polk .. 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



October 26, 1882. 
October 28, 1880. 
September 7, 1881. 
March 3, 1883. 
November 5, 1882. 
November 2, 1880. 
November 2, 1880. 



GRANT COUNTY. 



John H. Zahn 

Benjamin R. Norman 

John P. Campbell 

Joseph W. Stout 

Addison M. Baldwin.. 

Benjamin Crowell 

Elias C. Murray 



Clerk 

Sheriff 

Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 7, 1882. 
October 28, 1880. 
August 2, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 
August 21, 1881. 
November 5, 1880. 
November 7, 1880. 



GREENE COUNTY. 



John F. Slinkard.. 
Daniel M. Bynum 

Henry T. Neal 

John L. Harrell. ... 
John A. Porter ..... 
Newton Heaton ... 
Frank Shepherd... 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor, 



October 27, 1882. 
November 1, 1880. 
September 7, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 11, 1880. 
October 27, 1880. 



32 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



HAMILTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


November 1, 1883. 




Sheriff 


November 7, 1880. 






September 7, 1881. 
March 7, 1881. 










November 2. 1882. 








' ' 









HANCOCK COUNTY. 



Ephraim Marsh 

William H. Thompson 

Andrew Hagen 

Henry Wright 

N.H.Roberts 

Henry C. Garreott 

John "V. Conger 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder., 
Coroner.... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 
November 1, 
November 1, 
November 2, 
November 1, 
November 1 , 
November 1, 



1882. 
1880. 
1880. 
18S3. 
1882. 
1882. 
1882. 



HARBISON COUNTY. 



John Ridley 

Louis Brown 

Lewis W. Bowling.. 
Amzi W. Brewster.. 
William B. Hunter 

J. B. Cooper 

John Brewster 



Clerk November 7, 1S80. 

Sheriff November 1, 1880. 

Treasurer September 15, 1881. 

Auditor J November 1, 1883. 

Recorder November 7, 1882. 

Coroner November 1, 1880. 

Surveyor November 6, 1880. 



HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



William T. Haynes, 
James M. Emmons.. 

Wvatt Osborn 

William H.Nichols, 

John A. Osborn 

Benjamin Ilayden.. 
Joseph A. Chirk 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Survevor. 



Julv 26, 1884. 
November 7, 1880. 
September 7, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 7, 1882. 
November 2, 1880. 
Oetober 29, 1880. 



33 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



HENEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATUBE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 






Sheriff 


August 23, 1881. 
August 5, 1881. 


Frank M.Millikan 




William W. Cotteral 










October 31, 1880. 





















HOWAED COUNTY. 



John W. Cooper 

Alexander H. Drake 

David C. Speaker 

Henry L. Moreland.. 

Levi P. Rich 

John H. Ross 

Philip N. Schrader... 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 1883. 
November 7, 1880. 
November 2, 1880. 
March 6, 1884. 
November 1, 1883. 
October 25, 1880. 
November 7, 1880. 



HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 



Willis A. Jones.... 
John A.W.Kintz 
Daniel Christian.. 

Harry C. Black 

Porter Avers 

Joseph Patterson . 
John C. Altman.. 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner ... 
Surveyor. 



April 16, 1883. 
November 7, 1880. 
November 7, 1880. 
November 1, 1883. 
April 16, 1883. 
October 29, 1880. 
October 29, 1880. 



JACKSON COUNTY. 



Frank Burrell 

Joseph F. Applewhite ... 
Henry William Wacker 

Benjamin F. Price , 

Joseph K.Hamilton 

Daniel H.Brown 

William A.DowniEg .... 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner ... 
Surveyor. 



February 24, 1884. 
November 1Q, 1880. 
August 15, 1881. 
From November 18, 187S. 
November 3, 1880. 
October 27, 1880. 
October 27, 1880. 



3 — Sec. State. 



34 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



JASPEE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


May 1, 1884. 
October 29, 1880. 




Sheriff' 






August 12, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 










May 1, 1884. 
November 24, 1880. 










October 29, 1880. 









JAY COUNTY. 



Robert T. Hammons.. 

James T. Hartzell 

John W. Mason 

Robert P. Davis 

Patterson M. Hearr .. 
Thomas B. Evilsozer 
Dixon M. Bunch 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 188S. 
November 14, 1880. 
November 12, 1880. 
November 1 , 1883. 
November 1, 1883. 
October 29, 1880. 
October 29, 1880. 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 



A. Lowery Shannon 
Richard F. Nugent... 
Jonathan Schooley... 

Thomas Graham 

Jesse Waguer 

James H. Matthews. 
James H. Smith 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 13, 18S0. 
August 20, 1883. 
November 5, 1880. 
October 31, 1880. 
October 26, 1882. 
October 31, 1880. 
November 7, 18S0. 



JENNINGS COUNTY. 



Daniel Bacon 

Harmon Dixon 

Allen W.Brown 

P.C.McGannon 

Wales M. Campbell.... 
Anderson McGannon 
William B.Prather..., 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner.... 
Surveyor. 



October 27, 1882. 
November 11, 1880. 
August 7, 1881. 
November 1, 1880. 
November 7, 1882. 
November 11, 18S0. 
November 11, 1880. 



35 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



JOHNSON COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 




W.M.Neal 


Sheriff 






















John F. McClellan 



















KNOX COUNTY. 



William B. Robinson 

James H. Strouse 

Christian Hoffman.... 

Gerard Reiter 

Frederick Hall , 

Charles M. Cornoyer. 
John C. Hennon 



■Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner.... 
Surveyor. 



February M, 1884. 
November 1, 1880. 
November 11, 18S0. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 1, 1883 . 
October 29, 1880. 
October 29, 1880. 



KOSCIUSKO COUNTY. 



Joseph H. Taylor . 
Daniel W. Hamlin. 

Aaron Stumpff. 

Joseph S. Baker.... 
Johnson B. Roberds 
Horace P. Lamson. 
Caleb Hughes 



Clerk 

Sheriff .... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner ... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 1883. 
October 29, 1880. 
October 28, 1880. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 2, 1882. 
November 2, 1880. 
November 1, 1880. 



LAGRANGE COUNTY. 



Samuel P. Bradford 

Nelson Stacy 

John E. Anderson .. 
Samuel Sbepardson 

John P. Jones 

John B. Rowe 

Isaiah Peatt 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



May 22, 1881. 
October 29, 1880. 
September 26, 1881. 
November 10, 1882. 
November 11, 1880. 
October 27, 1880. 
November 11, 1880. 



36 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



LAKE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES, 




Clerk 






Sheriff 


October 29, 1880. 


William KxinbUl 




August 29, 1881. 






March 1, 1881. 






November 11, 1880. 






September 16, 1881. 
October 25, 1880. 













LAPORTE COUNTY. 



Charles Spaeth 

Fitch D. Bowen ... 
Thomas J. Foster.. 
Edward J. Church 

John H. Organ 

Darwin T. Brown.. 
James E. Bradly... 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



May 5, 1881. 
October 27, 1880. 
November 5, 1880. 
November 11, 1882. 
April 14, 1884. 
October 29, 1880. 
October 29, 18S0. 



LAWRENCE COUNTY. 



John M. Stalker... 

F.T.Dunihue 

Francis A. Sears... 

Isaac H. Crim 

William Erwin 

Alfred C. Harmon 
John B. Malott 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



February 11, 1881. 
February 24, 1881. 
October 24, 1880. 
November 1, 1883. 
October 29, 1880. 
November 1, 1880. 
November 1, 1880. 



MADISON COUNTY. 



Jesse L. Henry 

Thomas J. McMahan.. 

Daniel F. Mustard 

John L. Forkner 

Albert C. Davis 

Andrew K. Rokenfield 
Thomas F. Harris 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



October 24, 1882. 
November 6, 1880. 
August 15, 1881. 
November 1,1883. 
October 30, 1882. 
October 29, 1880. 
December 10, 1880. 



37 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



MARION COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


October 24, 1882. 




Sheriff 


Sample Loftin 




Septembers, 1881. 


William A. Pfuff 




Calvin F. Darnell 




October 23 1880 


William H. Wishard 




October 24, 1880. 


Harvey B. Fatout 




October 25, 1880. 









MARSHALL COUNTY. 



Oliver P. Klinger.. 

John V. Astley 

Frederick Fischer 

Krink Brook 

John L. Place 

Jacob Hoham 

Achilles North 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner.... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 1883. 
November 19, 1880. 
August 10, 1881. 
March 14, 1883. 
October 26, 1882. 
November 4, 1880. 
October 29, 1880. 



MARTIN COUNTY. 



David Govey 

Charles Wood 

Lewis Brooks 

William L. Town.., 
Edwin M. Smelser 
David R. Carico .... 
James M. Reilley... 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer, 
Auditor... 
Recorder., 
Coroner.... 
Surveyor. 



March 20, 1883. 
October 24, 1830, 
November 2, 1880 
November 7, 1882 
November 7, 1882 
November 1, 1880, 
November 2, 1880 



MIAMI COUNTY. 



Charles A. Parsons.., 
Vincent O. Donald.., 

John R. Porter 

Richard B. Runyan., 
William A. Gibney 

William Sutton , 

Richard H. Cole 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner „. 
Surveyor. 



June 6, 1883. 
November 7, 1880. 
August 30, 18S1. 
October 26, 1882. 
June 6, 1883. 
October 29, 1880. 
November 5, 1880. 



38 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



MONROE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TEEM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


November 13, 1S82. 




Sheriff 


November 13, 18S0. 












November 1, 1883. 






November 1, 1882. 






October 29, 1880. 






October 29, 1880. 









MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Theodore D. Brown.... 

William J. Krng 

Fountain Johnson 

James Henry Wasson 

Marion P. Wolf 

Frank Henry 

Ira McConnell 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



Novembers, 1883. 
August 22, 1881. 
September 1, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 
August 28, 1881. 
November 14, 1880. 
November 14, 1880. 



MORGAN COUNTY. 



Henry C. Hodges 

John C. Comer 

Elliott F. Branch 

William G. Bain 

William G. Garrison 
Samuel N. Randell.. 
Edgar A.Bowen 



Clerk 

Sheriff..".. 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



October 25, 1882. 
December 16, 1880. 
March 25, 1882. 
December 17, 1882. 
October 26, 1880. 
November 4, 1880. 
November 4, 1880. 



NEWT6N county. 



John G.Davis 

Hugh Parker 

John F. Johnson.. 
Alexander Sharp. 
George Bridgman 

J. B. Wescott 

Otis Shepard 



Clerk 

Sheriff ... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



Aprilll, 1884. 
November 2, 1880. 
November 2, 1880. 
April 11, 1884. 
April 11, 1884. 
November 2, 1880. 
November 15, 1880. 



39 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



NOBLE COUNTY. 



NAME. 



NATURE OF OFFICE. 



WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 



Samuel E. Alvord.. 
Richard Williams .. 

George Keehn 

William S. Kiser.... 

John Baughman 

Benjamin F. Myers 
A.P. Frink 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner ... 
Surveyor. 



October 31, 1880. 
July 8, 1881. 
August 14, 1881. 
November 1,1883. 
August 28, 1881. 
October 29, 1880. 
November 10, 1880. 



OHIO COUNTY. 



Will. W. Williams... 

John Monroe 

John C. Miller 

Joseph P. Humphill 

George B. Hall 

Enoch Drake 

Edward P. Niles 



Clerk t 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner ... 
Surveyor. 



October 31, 1880. 
November 15, 1880. 
August 10, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 1, 1883. 
October 27, 1880. 
November 15. 1880. 



OEANGE COUNTY. 





Clerk 


November 2, 1882. 


E. C. Braxton 


Sheriff 


November 1, 1880. 


Hiram E. Wells 




November 2, 18S0. 


David F. Stucker 




November 15, 1880. 






October 25, 1880. 






November 2, 1880. 






November 2, 1880. 









OWEN COUNTY. 



Noel W. Williams . 
Lycurgus H. Wood 

George W. Ellis 

N. D. Cox 

Jacob Kiphart 

Anderson B. Mills . 
George D. Phillips. 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner ... 
Surveyor. 



October 26, 1880. 
November 2, 1880. 
Septembers, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 2, 1880. 
November 15, 1880. 



40 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



PAEKE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


November 15, 1880. 




Sheriff 


November 2, 1880. 






October 29, 1880. 






November 2, 1882. 


William J. White 




November 2, 1882. 






October 29, 1880. 


John T. Campbell 




November 2, 1880. 







PERKY COUNTY. 



John T. Patrick... 

John Sweeney 

Peter Zackriegel... 
John W. Minor... 

Louis Dwyer 

John B. Rank 

Daniel R. McKim 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



March 10, 1884. 
November 15, 1880. 
August 12, 1881. 
October 27, 1882. 
March 10, 1884. 
October 28, 1880. 
October 31, 1880. 



PIKE COUNTY. 



Daniel C. Ashby 

Thomas J. Scales 

Jefferson W. Richardson 

Franklin Belderbock 

Mark Powers 

Wilson Stobaugh 

Josiah Morton 



Clerk'. 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



April 1, 1883. 
November 2, 1880. 
November 1, 1880. 
November 14, 1882. 
February 27, 1881. 
October 29, 1880. 
November 2, 1880. 



PORTER COUNTY. 



John M. Felton 

James P. Malone 

John W. Crumpackor 

William E. Brown 

William C.Wills 

William C. Parramore 
Henry Rankin 



Clerk 

Sheriff 

Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 1883. 
October 24, 1880. 
August 12, 1881. 
October 25, 1832. 
November 1 , 1883. 
November 2, 1880. 
November 1, 1880. 



41 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



POSEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


November 1, 1883. 




Sheriff 


August 30, 1881. 






August 30, 1881. 






March 1, 1883. 






November 1, 188S. 






October 24, 1880. 






October 24, 1880. 









PULASKI COUNTY. 



C. W. Wickersham.... 

JohnShill 

John R Conner 

Frederick H. Falvey 
Sylvester Brecker ... 
Thomas B. Hedges... 
John G. Boyles , 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder., 
Coroner.... 
Surveyor. 



May 25, 1881. 
August 27, 1881. 
September 16, 1881. 
November 1, 1882. 
May 25, 1881. 
October 30, 1880. 
November 15, 1880. 



PUTNAM COUNTY. 



Moses D. Bridges.. 
Moses T. Lewraan 
Henry H. Hillis... 
James U. Edwards 
Daniel Muhoney... 

C.F.Frazier 

George Henricks .. 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor.. . 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 4, 1882. 
October 29, 1880. 
September 17, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 17, 1880. 
November 4, 1880. 



KANDOLPH COUNTY. 



John W. Macy 

William W. M;icy 
Oliver C. Gordon.. 
George N. Edsrar .. 
Daniel C. Braden.. 

Isaac R. Ford 

Michael C. Gaffey 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



August 22, 1881. 
October 26, 1880. 
September 18, 1P81. 
October 25, 1882. 
August 22, 1881. 
October 30, J 880. 
October 25, 1880. 



42 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



RIPLEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 



NATURE OF OFFICE. 



WHEN TEEM EXPIRES. 



James W. Pate 

Amos Crozier 

William Leslie 

John H. Wernke.... 
Henry C. Sehmutte. 

John N. Hess 

Thomas L. Hughes 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



April 10, 1881. 
November 7, 18S0. 
October 16, 1881. 
March 1, 18S3. 
April 10, 1881. 
November 6, 1880. 
November 6, 1880. 



RUSH COUNTY. 



Jetson W.Smith.... 
Harrison S. Carney 

John Fleehort. 

Alexander Posey... 

John H.Osborn 

John H. Spurrier... 
Horace Hillligoss... 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 18S3. 
August 25, 1881. 
November 2, 1880. 
November 1, 18S3. 
August 25, 1883. 
August 25, 1881. 
November 2, 18S0. 



SCOTT COUNTY. 



Newton M. Wilson 

Charles W. Crusan 

Alexander L. Gladden 

Peter S. Dykins 

Samuel H. Burnett 

Henry L. Cravens 

George N. Wiggan 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Audiior... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



March 19, 1881. 
November 17, 1880. 
November 17, 18S0. 
November 4, 1882. 
October 29, 1882. 
November 17, 1880. 
November 17, 18S0. 



SHELBY COUNTY. 



Frederick H. Charden 

Albert McCorkle 

E. B. Amsden 

Joseph L. Carson 

Edward L. Davisson... 

James L. Capp 

Charles F. Webster 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 5, 1883. 
November 7, 1880. 
September 13, 1881. 
September 1, 1883. 
November 1,1883. 
November 7, 1880. 
November 7, 1880. 



43 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



SPENCER COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATUEE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


February 27, 1881. 
August 28, 1881. 
November 10, 1880. 




Sheriff 












William H. Ellis 




November 17, 1880. 






October 28, 1880. 


W. W. Wells 













STAEKE COUNTY. 



Mathias T. Hepner 

William Elmendorf 

Austin P. Dial 

Alexander H. Henderson 

Michael Kelly ,. 

Wilson T. Loring 

William C. Boyles , 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 17, 1880. 
October 25, 1P80. 
November 2, 1S80. 
November 17, 1880. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 2, 1880. 
November 17, 1880. 



ST. JOSEPH COUNTY. 



Timothy E. Howard 
James Daugherty ... 

John Hav 

William D. Smith... 
Harrison G. Beemer 

John C.Miller 

Arthur J. Stace 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 1,1883. 
November 17, 1880. 
November 29, 1880. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 17, 1880. 
November 17, 1880. 



STEUBEN COUNTY. 



OrvilleT. Goodale... 
William H. Keyes... 

Samuel Bright 

Robert H. Johnson.. 
W. Homer Twichell 

S. H. Fuller 

Charles A. Stackford 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner ... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 1883. 
September 10, 1881. 
September 5, 1881. 
March 1, 1S84. 
November 1, 1883. 
October 22, 1S80. 
August 18, 1881. 



44 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



SULLIVAN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


March 28 1884. 




Sheriff 


November 18, 1880. 






August 9, 1881. 






March 28, 1884. 






November 2, 1882. 






November 18, 1880. 






November 18, 1880. 









SWITZERLAND COUNTY. 



R. T. F. Abbott 


Clerk 


November 1, 1883. 


John P.White 


Sheriff 


October 30, 18S0. 






September 1, 1883. 


John Gill 




November 1, 1883. 






October 24, 1882. 


William Smith : 




November 1. 1880. 






November 2, 1880. 









TIPPECANOE COUNTY. 



James T. Chute 

Stephen O. Taylor 

M.L.Peck 

C.N.Johnson 

William Hilgus ... 

Silas T.Yount 

P.C.Vawter 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor.. 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 2, 1832. 
August 25, 1881. 
August 2, 1881. 
November 18, 1882. 
October 30, 1880. 
November 1, 1880. 
November 1, 1880. 



TIPTON COUNTY. 



Andrew B. Pitzer .., 
Robert M. Robcrson 

Jesse Alexander 

Archibald E. Small. 

John Long 

Andrew J. Barker .. 
J.S.Clark 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 7, 1882. 
November 23, 1830. 
August 17, 1881. 
November 2, 18S2. 
November 1, 1S83. 
October 27, 1880. 
November 7, 1880. 



45 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



UNION COUNTY. 



NAME. 



NATURE OF OFFICE. 



WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 



William O. Keffer . 
William M. Jarrell 
James McMannus . 
Daniel T.8nyder... 
Perry L.Snyder.... 
Henry C. Peters.... 
John J. Leonard 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer. 
Auditor..., 
Recorder., 
Coroner.... 
Surveyor. 



November 1, 1883 
November 1, 1880 
September 7, 1881 
November 1, 1883 
November 1 , 1S83 
October 30, 1880. 
October 26, 1880. 



VANDEEBUEGH COUNTY. 



Jesse W. Walker 

J. August Remeke .... 

Thomas P. Britton 

Wm. Warren, Jr 

Sanders B. Sauson 

Frederick Watger 

James D. Sanders, Jr, 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



November 10, 1883. 
November 2, 1880. 
October 1, 1881. 
November 2, 1880. 
November 10, 1880. 
December 5, 1880. 
October 30, 18S0. 



VEEMILLION COUNTY. 



James Roberts , 

Spencer H. Dallas 

John H. Bogart 

Thomas Cushman 
Cornelius S. Davis 
Thomas Biindley 
Piatt Z. Anderson 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



April 22, 1884. 
November 18, 1880. 
November 23, 1880. 
November 18, 1882. 
October 26, 1882. 
October 30, 1880. 
October 30, 1880. 



VIGO COUNTY. 



John K. Durkan 

Louis Hay 

Newton Rogers 

Andrew Grimes 

James Phillips 

Henry Ehreuhardt, 
Tully Simmons 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 

Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder. 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



May 4, 1881. 
November 18, 18S0. 
August 21, 1881. 
March 6, 1SS3. 
November 6, 18S3. 
November 18, 18S0. 
October 27, 1880. 



46 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



WABASH COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


November 1, 1883. 




Sheriff 


August 27, 1881. 
September 5, 1881. 
November 1, 1883. 






William S. Stitt... . 








November 2, 1S80. 


Richard E. Flin 




October 26, 1880. 






November 2, 1880. 









WARREN COUNTY. 



Henry C. Johnson.. 

M. H.Pearson 

Philip Gammer 

George Adams 

James D. Livergood 
Samuel Andrews.... 
Samuel Smith , 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



June 23, 1883. 
November 7, 1880. 
August 21, 1881. 
March 5, 1881. 
November 1,1880. 
November 3, 1880. 
November 7, 1880. 



WARRICK COUNTY. 



R.D. O.Moore 

William A. Williams 
Brannick Wilkinson. 

Union Bethell 

Rice Williams 

Earl Williams 

O. B. Pasco 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Survevor. 



February 24, 1884. 
August 30, 1881. 
October 30, 1880. 
October 25, 1880. 
February 24, 1884. 
October 30, 1880. 
January 19, 1881. 



WASHINGTON COUNTY. 



James M. Taylor 

George Fultz 

William M. Alvin 

William G. Jamison... 

Preston Bryan 

Samuel MeClann:ihan 
William C. McCoskey.. 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



October 27, 1882. 
November 8, 1880. 
September 21, 1881. 
October 27, 1883. 
November 8, 1882. 
August 29, 1881. 
November 8, 1880. 



47 



COUNTY OFFICERS— Continued. 



WAYNE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


NATURE OF OFFICE. 


WHEN TERM EXPIRES. 




Clerk 


October 29, 1880. 


William H. Trindle 


Sheriff.. 


November 13, 1880. 






November 15, 1880. 


Caleb S. DuHadway 




November 1, 1883. 




March 18, 1884. 






November 2, 1880. 


R. C Shute 




October 24, 1880. 









WELLS COUNTY. 



William J. Craig 

James B. Plessinger. 

Lawson Popejoy 

E. Y. Sturgis 

David E. Bulger 

W. W. McBride 

JohnE.Beil 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner ... 
Surveyor. 



November 2, 1882. 
August 27, 1881. 
December 15, 1880. 
November 1, 1883. 
November 1, 1883. 
December 13, 1880. 
November 2, 1880. 



WHITE COUNTY. 



Samuel P. Cowger. 

James Hay , 

John Faris 

Henry Van Voorst 
Ruius L. Harvey.. 

John Yopst 

Thomas M. Foltz.. 



Clerk 

Sheriff.... 
Treasurer 
Auditor... 
Recorder . 
Coroner... 
Surveyor. 



Julv 7, 1883. 
November 12, 1880. 
September 12, 1881. 
March 1, 1881. 
July 7, 1883, 
November 2, 1880. 
November 2, 1880. 



WHITLEY COUNTY. 



James M. Harrison 
Adam T. McGinley 

Joseph Clark 

W.H.H.Rutler 

Wright .Lancaster., 

Wm. Yontz , 

Levi Adams 



Clerk 

Sheriff... 
Treasure: 
Auditor.. 
Recorder 
Coroner.. 
Surveyor 



November 1, 18S3. 
November 19, 1880. 
November 8, 1880. 
November 1, 1882. 
November 1, 18S3. 
October 3, 18S0. 
October 30, 1880. 



NOTARIES PUBLIC. 



ADAMS COUNTY. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 






December 22, 1877. 






July 29, 1878. 






October 12, 1878. 









ALLEN COUNTY. 



George W.Jones 

Jacob J.Kern 

Allen M. Hartzell 

William Conner 

Daniel F. HardiDg 

W.J.Kern 

Julius M. Jemison 

Henry C. Berghoft 

John F. Curtice 

Samuel F. Swayue 

Joseph F. Hanna 

Clarence G.Smith 

Gideon W.Seavey 

John Shoffer 

Albert F. Schoenbein 

A. H. Carier 

John Scbofier 

William R.Plpak 

George L. Bittinger.... 
Willie H. Withers.... 

Charles E.Jones 

Joseph T.Poole 

Samuel L. Morris , 

Thomas Meegan 

John H. Fleming 

W.J.Vesey 



Fort Wayne. 
Fort Wayne. 
Fort Wayne. 
Fort Wayne. 
Fort Wayne. 
Fort Wayne. 
Fort Wayne. 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne. 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 
Monroeville. 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne. 
Fort Wayne 
Fort Wayne 



November 3, 1877. 
November 19, 1877. 
December 5, 1877. 
December 13, 1877. 
December 24, 1877. 
January 3, 1878. 
January 8, 1878. 
January 12, 1878. 
February 11, 1878. 
February 11, 1878. 
February 18, 1S78. 
February 23, 1878. 
March 5, 1878. 
March 6, 1878. 
March 22, 1873. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 18, 1878. 
April 27, 1878. 
Mav 9, 1878. 
May 20, 1878. 
July 8, 1878. 
August 17, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 
September 21, 1878. 
October 22, 1878. 
October 28, 1878. 



BAKTHOLOMEW COUNTY. 



Crockett Ricketts 

Jesse S. Rogers 

Joel Newsom 

William H. Aikin 

William H. Price 

Koert D. Hawley 

John B.Petelliot 

Charles S. Baker 

Joseph F. Matson 

William F. Strickland 



Columbus 

Columbus 

Azalia 

Hope 

Columbus 

Elizabethtown 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Hope 



November 20, 1877. 
February 5, 1878. 
February 28, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
May 21, 1878. 
May 31, 1878. 
July 5, 1878. 
July 31, 1878. 
September 4, 1878. 
October 26, 1878. 



BENTON COUNTY. 



Robert J. Malaby 

John F.Brown 

William A. Redding... 
Herbert C. Woodhams 

Henry J.Parker 

Charles Dailey 

George Wadsworth 



Fowler.... 
Fowler.... 
Fowler.... 
Otterbein 
Aruliia .... 
Oxford... 
Fowler... 



November 24, 1877. 
March 20, 1878. 
March 21, 1878. 
April 8, 1878. 
April 15, 1878. 
June 5, 1878. 
August 24, 1878. 



49 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



BLACKFORD COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 






November 30, 1877. 




Hartford City 


December 22, 1877. 




Hartford City 


October 12, 1878. 









BOONE COUNTY. 



Henry C. WillB 

George Dodson 

John C. Burroughs... 

Jesse Smith 

Nathan Crosby 

Simeon Buchanan .... 
William A.Benbow . 
Samuel W. Ferguson 
William J.Darnall ... 
Samuel L. Hamilton, 

Jos. H. Davis , 

Barton S. Higgin 

James E. Cook , 



Lebanon ... 
Lebanon ... 
Lebanon ... 
Zionsville.. 
Zionsville.. 
Lebanon ... 
Lebanon ... 
Lebanon ... 
Jamestown 
Lebanon ... 
Jamestown 
Lebanon ... 
Jamestown 



November 16, 1877. 
November 20, 1877. 
November 20, 1877. 
December 7, 1877. 
February 15, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
May 1, 1878. 
June 5, 1878. 
July 9, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 
September 21, 1878. 
September 9, 1878. 



BROWN COUNTY. 



Fletcher D. Wood Beck's Grove 

William M.Mason Nashville 




April 9, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 



CARROLL COUNTY. 



Benjamin F. Steele.... 
Arthur P. McFarland 

John L.Sims 

Lewis B.Sims 



Camden 
Camden 
Delphi.. 
Delphi.. 



November 28, 1877. 
December 1, 1877. 
May 6, 1878. 
August 2, 1878. 



CASS COUNTY. 



Asa M. Dame 

Aaron M. Flory .. 
George E. Ross .... 
Edgar D. Closson . 

W. S. Wright 

Philip W. Grelle . 
Elmore S. Daniels 



Logansport 
Logan sport 
Logansport 
Logansport 
Logansport 
Logansport 
Logansport 



November 12, 1877. 
November 14, 1877. 
January 30, 1878. 
Februarv 15, 1878. 
February 21, 1878. 
May 29, 1878. 
October 14, 1878. 



4 — Sec. State. 



50 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



CLARK COONTY. 



NAME. 



RESIDENCE. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



Louis Badger 

John T. Hamilton 

Henry F. Work 

Houston B. Waggoner 

Henry A. Barft 

"Willis B. Goodwin 



New Market 

Otto 

New Washington 

Henryville 

Jefferson ville 

Jefferson ville 



June 30, 1S78. 
March 20, 1878. 
.March 27, 1878. 
April 11, ls78. 
June 24, 1878. 
June 2 1, 1878. 



CLAY COUNTY. 



James F. Casteel 

William W. Carter.... 
Walter R. Gutherie.... 

William F. Yocum 

W. Scott Zenor- 

Hiram Teter 

Charles H. Knight.... 

John Trissel 

William B. Ferguson 

George A. Byrd 

Esau Preston 

J. S. Robinson 



Brazil 

Brazil , 

Brazil 

Staunton 

Bowling Green 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Bowling Green 

Harmony 

Brazil 

Carbon 

Brazil 



November 6, 1877. 
November 13, 1877. 
Novemher 24, 1877. 
December 10, 1877. 
December 11, lb77. 
December 13, 1877. 
February 11, 1878. 
May 1, 1878. 
May 24, 1878. 
June 1, 1878. 
June 24, 1878. 
September 7, 1878. 



CLINTON COUNTY. 



Henry C. Atcbinson 
Henry Y. Morrison- 
Wallace J. Brown ... 

W. A. Staley 

Joseph C. Suit 

Samuel Vanton 

James A. Merrill 

William E. Ross 

Myron M. Drury 

Thomas Waldren 

Ditto M. Amos 

James S. Nolan 

Edward J. Benjamin 
David J. McMoth 



Hillsburg. 
Frankfort . 

Forest 

Frankfort.. 
Frankfort. 
Frankfort. 
Frankfort. 
Frankfort. 
Frankfort. 
Frankfort. 
Frankfort. 
Frankfort. 
Frankfort. 
Frankfort. 



November 24, 1877. 
November 26, 1877. 
January 3, 1878. 
January 12, 1878. 
January 12, 1878. 
Januarv 21, 1878. 
January 28, 1878. 
February 25, 1878. 
March 22, 1873. 
March 30, 1878. 
May 31, 1878. 
J uly 24, 1878. 
October 21, 1878. 
October 22, 1878. 



CRAWFORD COUNTY. 



Samuel D.Luckctt Leavenworth. 



March 12, 1878. 



DAVIESS COUNTY. 



Samuel E. Kercheval 

Francis Stringer 

Joseph D. Loughlin.... 

James W. Ogdon 

John J. Fraine 



Washington 
Wnshingion 
Washington 
Washington 
Washington 



January 18, 1878. 
January 28, 1878. 
February Hi, 1878. 
March 25, 1878. 
April 2, 1878. 



51 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



DEARBORN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 


Hugh S. Miller 




November 6, 1877. 


Adolph H.Markel 




February 21, 1878. 
February 2H, 1878. 
March 4, 1878. 














March 13, 1878. 






March 14, 1878. 






March 15, 1878. 






April 13, 1878. 




Guilford 


April 2G, 1878. 
May 1,1878. 

June 29, 1878. 


Harvey H. Che^k . . 












September 17, 1878. 


Hugh D. McMullen 




September 18, 1878. 
October 18, 1873. 










October 25, 1878. 









DECATUR COUNTY. 



John H. Schroeder 

Robert E. Moore 

Albert H. Fisher 

Warren B. Wilson 

James K. Ewing 

David A.Tucker 

Benjamin F. Gastin . 

Warren Clark 

Benjamin F. Bennett 



Greensburg 
Clarksburg. 
Greensburg 
Greensburg 
Greensburg 
Greensburg 
Greensburg 
Greensburg 
Greensburg 



December 31, 1877. 
January 9, 1878. 
February 18, 1878. 
February 18, 1878. 
March 4, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 25, 1S73. 
August 27, 1878. 
September IT, 1878. 



DeKALB county. 



Genrg'e Barney 

John W.Riekle 

O.Z.Hubbcll 

D. Z. Hoffman 

Jacob B. Hoover 

Ezra D. Hartman„... 

Oassius J. Coats. , 

Guy Plum 

R. A. Frank 

R. Dexter Tefft 

John R. Young 

Charles E. Emanuel 

Bennjah B.Long 

Frank W. Willis 



Spencerville, 

Auburn 

Butler 

Auburn 

Waterloo 

Auburn.. 

Auburn 

Auburn 

Butler 

Auburn 

Butler 

Auburn- 

Waterloo 

Waterloo 



November 9, 1877. 
November 16, 1877. 
November 19, 1877. 
December 11, 1877. 
January 3, 1377. 
January 8, 1877. 
January 8, 1877. 
January 9, 1877. 
February 15, 1877. 
March 1, 1877. 
March 2, 1877. 
March 14, 1877. 
June 7, 1877. 
August 1, 1877. 



DELAWARE COUNTY. 



Adolph C. Silverbarg 
Clayton B. Templer.. 
Thomas J. Blount .... 

GeorgeR.Green 

Robert M. Snodgrass. 

Otho Dawden 

John R. Munsey 

Theo. F.Rose 

George H. Koons 



Muncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Rayrton 

Reed's Station 

Albany 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 



November 21, 1877. 
November 24, 1877. 
November 24, 1877. 
March 22, 1S77. 
May 10, 1S77. 
Mav 20, 1.S77. 
May 31, 1S77. 
May 31, 1877. 
August 31, 1877. 



52 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



DUBOIS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 






February 28, 1878. 




WiUham 


March 11, 1878. 









ELKHAKT COUNTY. 



John W. Nashbaum 
William L. Walpuss 
Joseph B. Carrell .... 
Emanuel C. Bickle.. 
Livy Chamberlain... 

Henry C. Dodge , 

Charles W. Fish 

William J. Davis 

George D. Merritt ... 

Isaac H. Everett 

Henry C. Curtis 

Uttey B. Curtis 

Samuel D. Straw 



Goshen 

Elkhart 

Middlebury 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Goshen 

Bristol 

Elkhart 

Goshen 

Goshen 

Elkhart 



February 15, 1878. 
February 16, 1878. 
February 18, 1878. 
March 6, 1878. 
April 11, 1878. 
April 27, 1878. 
May 14, 1878. 
May 16, 1878. 
May 21, 1878. 
June 14, 1878. 
October 24, 1878. 
October 24, 1878. 
October 28, 1878. 



FAYETTE COUNTY. 



Jefferson H. Claypool 

Charles Merrell 

Charles Roehl 

Charles A.Murray .... 



Connersville 
Connersville 
Connersville 
Connersville 



February 11, 1878. 
June 20, 1878. 
October 2, 1878. 
October 31, 1878. 



FLOYD COUNTY. 



William J.Dyer 

Lourie Todd Kent... 

John O.Greene 

William Sackett 

John H. Stotsenberg 



New Albany 
New Albany 
New Albany 
New Albany 
New Albany 



December 8, 1877. 
May 24, 1878. 
June 4, 1878. 
June 26, 1878. 
September 3, 1878. 



FOUNTAIN COUNTY. 



Jamison H. Wilson .. 
Manford Schronover 

Leroy S.Scott 

Hardy Savage 

Caleb W. Waterman 
Samuel M. Cambern 
Alexander Johnson 

William E. Baker 

Lucas Nebeker 

William Spilling 



Newtown.... 

Attica ,., 

Newton 

Covington.... 
Covington.... 
Covington.... 
Covington.... 
Veedersburg 
Covington.... 
Covington.... 



November 6, 1877. 
December 27, 1877. 
February 2, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 20, 1878. 
July 3, 1878. 
July 23, 1878. 
September 17, 1878. 
September 20, 1878. 
October 7, 1878. 



53 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



FEANKLIN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 






January 18, 1878. 
January 29, 1878. 










February 22, 1878. 






May 22, 1878. 
June 29, 1878. 






Thomas G.Pike 




September 14, 1878. 






October 7, 1878. 






October 19, 1878. 









FULTON COUNTY. 







April 24, 1878. 
July 11, 1878. 
July 11, 1878. 














October 7, 1878. 


Bobert Keith 




October 15, 1878. 









GIBSON COUNTY. 



John TenBarge 

John W.Ewing 

James M. Cbckram .. 
diaries H. Holconib 
Samuel A. Stewart ., 
Chester F. Garrison.. 
William M. Lamb ... 
Anton Jeser 



Haubstadt ... 

Princeton 

Oakland City 

Princeton 

Patoka 

Fort Branch 

Princeton 

Haubstadt ... 



December 5, 1877. 
December 17, 1877. 
June 5, 1878. 
March 19, 1878. 
March 20, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
August 24, 1878. 
October 14, 1878. 



GEANT COUNTY. 



William Behymer 

William D. Westfleld.. 

John T. Strange 

John M.Wallace 

Henderson Oliver 

Frank C Brown 

Miles E. Murphey 

Lancaster D. Baldwin 

Joseph L. Custer 

Ecra F. Vinson- 

Andrew T. Wright 

Richard G. Steele 

Oscar A. Wickersham 
Jacob E. Jester 



Ragdon 

Mariou 

Marion ..... 

Marion 

Marion 

Jonesboro .. 

Marion 

Marion 

Marion 

Fairmount 

Marion 

Marion 

Marion 

Sweetser ... 



November 19, 1877. 
November 28, 1877. 
November 30, 1877. 
December 5, 1877. 
February 15, 1878. 
February 15, 1878. 
February 23, 1878. 
February 25, 1878. 
March 16, 1878. 
May 8, 1878. 
May 15, 1878. 
May 16, 1878. 
May 16, 1878. 
September 14, 1878. 



54 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



GREENE COUNTY. 



NAME. 



RESIDENCE. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



William C. Andrews.. 

Reason C. Hilburn 

Samuel D. A Wander, 

Jos. A.Morrow 

James O. Burton 

Addison Cox 

John S. Bays 

Edward Braden, Jr.... 



Worthington 
Newberry ... 
HobbieviJle .. 
Cincinnati ... 

Marco.. 

Hobbieville- 
Worthington 
Linton 



December 26, 1877. 
February 25, 1878. 
March 29, 1876. 
April 19, 1878. 
April 29, 1878. 
Julv 8, 1878. 
August 23, 1878. 
October 28, 1878. 



HAMILTON COUNTY. 



Theodore P.Davis 

David W. Patty 

Martin Summers 

Eben Teter 

James Cirter„ 

Joseph Nicholson 

Michael T.Shiel 

William A. Wainwright. 

Calvin W. Granger 

Hoxie G. Kenyan 

Walter R.Fertig 

Henry A. Lee 



Noblesville., 
Noblesville.. 



Brxley 

Arcadia 

Olarksville .. 
Noblesville. 
Noblesville. 
Noblesville. 
Noblesville. 
Noblesville. 
Noblesville. 



December 22, 1877. 
December 22, 1877. 
March 5, 1878. 
March 8, 1878. 
April 23, 1878. 
May 9, 1878. 
May 10, 1878. 
June 24, 1878. 
June 25, 1878. 
August 14, 1878. 
September 11, 1878. 
September 25, 1878. 



HANCOCK COUNTY. 



Reuben A. Riley 

Aaron Pope 

Amos A. New , 

John W. Jones 

Richard A. Black 

Marshall B. Gooding 



Greenfield ... 
McCordsville 
Greenfield ... 
Greenfield ... 
Greenfield ... 
Greenfield ... 



May 1.1878. 
Julv 2, 1878. 
September 5, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 
October 18, 1878. 
October 24, 1878. 



HAKEISON COUNTY. 



Major W.Funk 

Jacob A. Horner 

Benjnmin Q. A.Gresham. 

Edward R. Berry 

Marcus A. Wolf 

Alfred D. Osborn 



Cory don .... 
Hancock .... 

Rusemond. . 
Corydon .... 
Palmyra .... 



December 19, 1877. 
January 4, 1878. 
May IS, 1878. 
June 3, 1878. 
June 10, 1878. 
August 24, 1878. 



HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



Milton Lowden 

William E. Cowper.... 

Cyrus L.Hunt 

Cyrus L Stanley 

John Morgan 

John F. McCray 

Leander D. Boyd , 

Alexander L. Masters 

Charles F. Bown 

Elizabeth Ellington .. 



Salem 

Danville 

Danville ...... 

Danville 

Danville 

Brnwnsburg.. 

Danville 

Stilesville,.... 

Danville 

North Salem 



December 4, 1877. 
February 5, 1878. 
February 25, 1S78. 
June 5, 1S78. 
June 17, 1878. 
July 2, 1878. 
August 27, 1878. 
September 16, 1878. 
September 26, 1878. 
September 24, 1878. 



55 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



HENEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 


EESIDENCE. 


DATE OF C0MMIS6ION. 






November 6, 1877. 








Lilburn White 












James T. Mellett 










December 7, 1877. 






January 23, 1878. 
January 25, 1878. 
March 23, 1878. 


Harry S. Mellett 












March 25, 1878. 






April 18, 18 7 8. 
April 23, 1878. 
April 24, 1878. 
April 26, 1878. 
oeptember 19, 1878. 
October 4, 1878. 














Prank W. Fitzhugh 















HOWARD COUNTY. 



A.L.Vickrey 

S.B.Purvis 

Levi Conner 

Freeman Cooper 

Peter V.Cole- 

John Q. Lymond 

Thomns A. Fortner... 

Robert L. Klarn 

Walter F. Templin .. 
Edward Pritchard..., 
William C.Purdiew 

D.W.Woods 

Lex J. Kirkpatrick _ 
Newton B. Smith-... 



Center PostoflBce 
Center Postoffiee 

Jerome 

Russiaville 

Green town 

Kokoruo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Jerome 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 



December 1, 1877. 
December 18, 1877. 
January 10, 1S78. 
February 11, 1878. 
February 15, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
May 10, 1S78. 
July 6, 1878. 
July 31, 1878. 
August 2, 1878. 
August 19, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 
October 18, 1878. 



HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 



Frederic M. Cole 

Thomas Roche 

Alfred Mnore 

William P. Kees 

George W. States 

Buell M.Cobb 

James M. Hittebrand 



Huntington.. 
Huntington- 
Huntington.. 
Huntington- 
Huntington.. 
Huntington.. 
Huntington- 



January 24, 1378. 
January 30, 1878. 
April 1G, 1878. 
June 17, 1878. 
June 18, 1878. 
August 24, 1878. 
October 18, 1878. 



JACKSON COUNTY. 



Lucius D. Carpenter 
Joseph H. Hodapp... 
Frederick J . My er . . . 

Frank Fassokl 

Adam Scott 

Robert M. Petrick... 



Seymour , 

Seymour 

Vallonia 

Brownstown 
Browns town 
Brownstown 



January 3, 1878. 
January 12, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
May 11, 1*78. 
May 13, 1878. 
May 25, 1878. 



56 



NOTAKIES PUBLIC— Continued. 

/ 

JASPEE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 






November 21, 1877. 






November 28, 1877. 






December 5, 1877. 






May 28, 1878. 






September 17, 1878. 






October 18, 1878. 









JAY COUNTY. 



Marshall C. Culver... 
Jeremiah Snelbaker 
Cassius M. Perdieu .. 
John R. Perdieu 



Portland... 
Salamonia 
Portland... 
Portland .. 



November 17, 1877. 
June 19, 1878. 
July 29, 1878. 
August 20, 1878. 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 



Abraham R. Sweet 

Almond Daniells 

Edward G. Leland 

William M. Jackman 

Philip J. Dipper 

James Roberts 

James G. McCaslin 

Walter S.Roberts 

Eugene G. Hay 

Daniel Rector 

William James Johnson 
Edward Kampe 



Lexington, Scott county 

Madison 

Madison 

Madison 

Madison 

Madison 

Deputy 

Madison 

Madison 

Madison 

Madison 

Madison 



November 28, 1877. 
January 28, 1878. 
February 15, 1878. 
May 6, 1878. 
May 22, 1878. 
May 25, 1878. 
July 8, 1878. 
July 29, 1878. 
August 24, 1878. 
October 14, 1878. 
October 2fi, 1878. 
October 29, 1878. 



JENNINGS COUNTY. 



John T.Wright 

Hiram O'Conner 

Jephtha D. New 

George F. Lawrence . 
Alexander Shepherd 
William H. Conner.. . 
Benjamin Pay ton .... 
JohnD.Kidd 



Parris' Crossing 

Nebraska 

Vernon 

Commiskey 

North Vernon... 
North Vernon... 

Nebraska 

Brewersville .... 



November 17, 1877. 
December 24, 1877. 
January 18, 1878. 
March 8, 1878. 
March 28, 1878. 
May 27, 1878. 
August 12, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 



JOHNSON COUNTY. 









John M. Dill 




July 17, 1878. 






August 9, 1878. 






June 15, 1378. 






August 19, 1878. 






September 25, 1878. 









57 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



KNOX COUNTY. 



NAME. 



KESIDENCE. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



James F. Kackley... 

Charles E. Crane 

Jerome Omvery 

Isaac H. Kalley 

James L. Culbertson 



Vinrennes ... 

SaDdborn 

Vineennes.... 

Oaktown 

Edwardsport 



February 21,1878. 
April 19, 1878. 
June 7. 1878. 
September 20, 1878. 
October 30, 1878. 



KOSCIUSKO COUNTY. 



Aruna P. Cosgrove..... 
Austin M. Sanderson 

John A. Moon 

Isaac L. Ayers 

Charles A. Chapman.. 
Hamilton J. Conner., 
Abraham Brubaker.... 

Benjamin Yohn , 

E.A. Blue 

DayidF. Kuflel 



Warsaw 

Leesburg 

Warsaw 

Warsaw 

Warsaw 

Silver Lake 

Warsaw 

Boydston's Mills 

Yellow Creek 

Piercton 



November 7, 1877. 
December 27, 1877. 
January 18, 1878. 
January 21, 1878. 
April 19, 1878. 
May 17, 1878. 
May 18, 1878. 
June 17, 1878. 
June 26, 1878. 
July 24, 1878. 



LAGKANGE COUNTY. 



Wesley C Glasgow. 
Francis M. Vedder.. 
JohnP.Selly 



Lagrange 
Lagrange 
Lagrange 



December 8, 1877. 
January 24, 1878. 
March 1, 1878. 



LAKE COUNTY. 



Eugene Farley ..... 
Gharles F. Griffin., 



Crown Point. 
Crown Point. 



November 24, 1877. 
July 25, 1*78. 



LAPOKTE COUNTY. 



Lawrence S. Hoadley 

Oonrad Becker 

Nathaniel S. Paul 

David J. Wile 

Jared H. Orr 

H. H. Francis 

George C. Dorland 

Edson G.Thomas 

W. H. Schoeaemann .. 

Martin T.Krueger 

William A. Wilson.... 

Geo. S.Seymour 

Henry Wing 



Haskell 

Laporte 

Laporte 

Laporte 

Laporte 

Michigan City 

Laporte 

Laporte 

Michigan City 
Michigan City 

Laporte 

Laporte 

Laporte 



December 26, 1877. 
January 30, 1878. 
February 5, 1878. 
February 5, 1878. 
February 7, 1878. 
February 6, 1878. 
February 23, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 16, 1878. 
Mav 2, 1878. 
July 18, 1878. 
October 18, 1878. 
October 18, 1878. 



58 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



LAWRENCE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


EESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 




Mitchell 


December 8, 1877. 




Bedford- 


February 26, 1878. 






March 11, 1878. 






April 12, 1878. 









MADISON COUNTY. 







November 24, 1877. 






Januarv 24, 1878. 


William J.Eorhell 




Juno 4, 1878. 






June 2ii, 1878. 






July 18, 1878. 






July 18, 1878. 
August 2G, 1878. 














October 12, 1878. 









MARION COUNTY. 



Thomas CDav 

William C. Griffith 

Charles R. Myers 

Henry C. Griffin- 

Thomas A. Goodwin.... 

G. E. Morrison 

Jas. M. Richardson 

Charles P. Watson 

John S. Dick j rson 

William L. Malone 

WillS.Garber 

Thomas J. Heiskil 

Peter Wies„ 

Stanton J. Peele 

Benjamin D. WelUort . 
Samuel E. Perkins, Jr . 
Thomas W. Dunham ... 

Frank M.Sabin 

James N. Burford , 

John O.Moore 

Ferdinand A. Lshr 

Joshua E. Florea 

Adam R. Miller 

James R. Routh 

Theodore F. H irrison.., 
James E. Franklin 

Carrie A.Goodwin , 

John S. Goodwin 

E.M.Johnson 

Andrew H. Brunei- 

Ambrose P.Stanton ... 

William C.Kappes 

Anthony I. Bristol 

William F.Mason 

Vinson Carter 

A. C. Trowbridge 

Cliarles E. Joslin 



Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

In.iiauapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapnlis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indiaoapolis . 
Indianapolis . 

Innianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapnlis . 

Indianapolis . 

Indianapolis , 

Indianapolis 

Indianapnlis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 



November 1, 1877. 
November 1, 1877. 
November 2, 1877. 
November 7, 1877. 
November 13, 1S77. 
November 13, 1877. 
November 23, 1877. 
November 27, 1S77. 
November 27, 1877. 
November 30, 1877. 
December 4, 1877. 
December 5, 1877. 
December 5. 1877. 
December 10, 1877. 
December 12, 1877. 
December 20, 1877. 
D-cember 27, 1877. 
Deeembar 31. 1877. 
January 2, 1878. 
January 4, 1878. 
January 9, 1878. 
January 11, 1878. 
January 12, 1878. 
January 14, 1878. 
Januarv 18, 1878. 
January II), 1878_ 
January 22, 1878. 
January 21, 1878. 
Januarv 30, 1878. 
Januarv 30, 1378. 
Januarv 30, 1878. 
Januarv 30, 1878. 
February (i, 1878. 
February 13, 1878. 
February 15, 1878. 
February 15, 1878. 
February 16, 1878. 



59 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



MARION COUNTY— Continued. 



NAME. 




DATE OF COMMISSION. 



Chales F. Robins 

Isaiah Locke 

Arthur H illidny 

George <J. ttitt 

Albert G. Hardin- 

Smith H.Myers 

George Kuhn , 

James T.Hill 

Wilber F. Browder 

Datus E. Mvers 

William H.Blair 

John McClelland 

Hilary Clay 

James P. Fowler 

Thomas C. Moore 

John \V. Blake „ 

John B. Brewer 

William A. Hughes 

W.N.Harding 

D.S. Alexander 

Max Henry 

John R. Eider 

Curl Habich 

Charles Btllenger 

Charles W. Gorsuch 

Nicholas Van Horn 

Horace Spaed 

Emsley Wright 

Erastus O. Frink 

Augustus B. Young 

Henry Eitel 

Joseph A. Moore , 

Alfred A. Falkenburg ... 

Charles E. Coffin 

Frederick D. Miner 

Maleomb A. Lower , 

Samuel F. Fraz'c 

Marquis D. L r >ssv 

William A.Cildwell 

John W.Haleomb 

Lewis Wallace 

John T. Lecklider 

Lewis Newberger , 

W.A.Bell 

William J.McCullough. 

Robert L. Green 

John Kidd 

Nathaniel N. Morris 

Stedman J. Rockwell .... 

Thomas H.Spann 

Calvin F. Booker 

Peirce Norton 

Charles W. Pitcher 

Myron North 

Edward 8. Field... 

John F. Orndorif 

Lawrence G. Hay 

Ovid D.Butler 

Ross Ciark 

Charles M. Ciopar 

Richard W.Thompson.. 

William Rowe 

Will F. A. B -ruhamer .. 

James A. Buchanan 

Walter Kessler_ 

Edward R. Tomlinson .. 



February 18, 1878, 

February 18, 1878. 

February 21, 1878. 

February 21, 1878. 

February 21, 1878. 

March 11, 1878. 

March 14, 1878. 

March 14, 1878. 

March 14, 1878. 

March 21, 1878. 

March 23, 1878. 

March 23, 1878. 

March 25, 1878. 

March 25, 1878. 

March 30, 1878. 

April 4, 1878. 

April S, 1878. 

April 5, 1878. 

April 12, 1878. 

April 13, 1878. 

April 16, 1878. 

April 25, 1S7S. 

May 7, 1878. 

Mav 11, 1878. 

May 10, 1878. 

May 24, 1878. 

May 28, 1878. 

May 29, 1878. 

June 4, 1878. 

June 14, 1,878. 

June 17, 1878. 

June 25, 1878. 

July 9, 1878. 

July 13, 1878. 

July 22, 1878. 

August 9, 1878. 

August 13, 1878. 

August 13, 1878. 

Au-ust 14, 1878. 

August 2li, 1878. 

Au-ust 21, 1878. 

August 28, 1»78. 

September ii, 1878. 

September 9, 1878. 

September 12, 187*. 

September 12, 1878. 

September 17, 1878. 

Indianapolis I September 19, 1878. 

Indianapolis September 24, 1378. 

Indianapolis September 24, 1878. 

Indianapolis September 28, 1S78. 



Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indian apolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis , 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis , 
Iudianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Iudianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Iudianapolis , 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis , 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis , 
Indianapolis , 
Ind anapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis , 
Indianapolis , 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis . 
Iudianapolis . 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 



September 23, 1878. 
October 4, 1878. 
October 7, 187S. 
Ojtober 14, 1878. 
October 18, 1878. 
October 21, 1878. 
October 21, 1878. 
October 24, 1878. 
October 24, 1878. 
October 24, 1878. 
October 24, 1878. 



Indianapolis I October 24, 1878. 

Indianapolis October 2tj, 1878. 

Indiana]K)lis October 30, 1873. 

Indianapolis October 30, 1S78. 



60 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



MARSHALL COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION 


John O.Fife ... 




November 3, 1877. 






November 6, 1877. 






November 15, 1877. 






November 17, 1877. 






December 1, 1877. 






January 14, 1878. 
January 28, 1878. 
February 2, 1878. 
February 5, 1878. 






JohnNeff. 








Brodie W. Parks 




April 5, 1878. 
May 22, 1878. 
October 14, 1878. 

















MARTIN COUNTY. 



Noah Moser 

James T. Rogers 
Thomas Brown.. 



Loogootee 
Shoals .... 
Shoals .... 



January 19, 1878. 
February 15, 1878^ 
September 5, 1878. 



MIAMI COUNTY. 



Ethan T. Reasoner 

John Mitchell 

David W. Curtis 

R.P. Effinger 

Thomas E. Sangster .. 

Collins E. Miller 

William E. Mowbray. 
Stephen D. Carpenter 
Ephraim Smith 



Peru 

Peru 

North Grove 

Peru 

Peru 

Peru 

Peru 

Peru 

Amboy 



November 7, 1877. 
November 13, 1877. 
November 20, 1877. 
November 30, 1877. 
February 23, 1878. 
March 27, 1878. 
August 21, 1878. 
August 26, 1878. 
October 15, 1878. 



MONROE COUNTY. 



Elbert E. Sadler 

Frederick W. Earnshaw 

John Graham 

Thomas C. Perring 

William H.Jackson 

John A.Walker 

William P.Rogers 

Jeremiah F. Pitman S, 



Bloomington 
Harrodsburg 
Bloomington 
Bloomington 
Elliotsville... 
Elliotsville... 
Bloomington 
Bloomington 



November 17, 1877. 
November 21, 1877. 
January 18, 1878. 
February 2, 1878. 
March 14, 1878. 
April 24, 1878. 
October 1, 1878. 
October 22, 187^. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



James M. Sellers 

Samuel S. Martin 

Jajaes Heaton 

Samuel W.Austin.... 
John R. Courtney .... 
Thomas H. Messick... 

Henry B. Hulett 

Marion E. C'lodfelter. 
Benjamin F. Restine 



Crawfordsville 
Crawfordsville 
Crawfordsville 
Crawfordsville 
Crawfordsville 
Crawfordsville 

Ladoga 

New Ross 

Crawfordsville" 



November 15, 1877. 
December 11, 1877. 
December 21, 1877. 
January 3, 1878. 
January 23, 1878. 
January 25, 1878. 
March 26, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 



61 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



MORGAN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 






January 25, 1878. 






September 5, 1878. 









NEWTON COUNTY. 



Milton L. Humston 

JohnH>ss 

John Gordon, Jr 



Morroeco. 
Kentland 
Goodland 



November 12, 1877. 
November 21, 1877. 
October 29, 1878. 



NOBLE COUNTY. 



Allen D. Maggart 

Augustus A. Chapin 

Vincent C. Mains 

Ira Kinney 

H.M. Richard 

Daniel W. Green 

FrankP.Bothwell... 
Daniel H. Kene 



Cromwell .... 
Kendallville 
Kendallville 

Ari 

Swan 

Ligonier 

Albion 

Kendallville. 



November 6, 1877. 

January 3, 1878. 

February 15, 1878. 
I March 6, 1878. 
I Mav 1, 1878. 

June 15,1878. 

October 18, 1878. 
I October 18, 1878. 



OHIO COUNTY. 



S.M.Jelley. 



May 22, 1878. 



ORANGE COUNTY. 



William T. Spicely 
Thomas B. Buskirk 
El bridge G.Wilson 

Will H.Martin 

Thomas G.Mahan.. 

Samuel Ryan 

Bamuel S. Murphy.. 



Orleans 

Paoli 

Newton Stewart 

Paoli 

Orleans 

French Lick 

Paoli , 



November 24, 1877. 
Januarv 23, 1878. 
March 22, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
May 20, 1878. 
July 24, 1878. 
August 7, 1878. 



OWEN COUNTY. 



John Heath.... 
David L. Weir. 



Spencer . 
Gosport . 



April 11, 1878. 
October 15, 1878. 



62 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continue. 



PARKE COUNTY. 



NAME. 



RESIDENCE. 



DATE OF COMMISSION 



John T. Campbell.... 

James Jacobs 

Andrew J. Chambers 

John D. Connelly 

Hugh P. Hocker". 

Truman S. White.... 
Frank M. Howard.... 



Rockville ... 
Montezuma 

Catlin 

Annapolis... 
Rockville... 

Lena 

Rockville ... 



February 2, 1878. 
February 2, 1878. 
February 23, 1878. 
April 8, 1878. 
June 13, 1*78. 
June 21, 1878. 
Julv 15, 1878. 



PERRY COUNTY. 



William L. ShaJIcross 
Gustave Huthsteiner, 

Gabriel Cooper 

Henry Ninisgeru.. 



Can n el ton 
TellCitv.. 
Adyevil'le 
Tell City.. 



November 26, 1877. 
Febi uary 25, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
Septum tier 2, 1878. 



PIKE COUNTY. 



William A.Olephant.... 
Charles H. MiCarty.... 
William H. Thompson. 
George Bee_ 



Petersburg. 
lVtersliurg. 
Winslow .... 



December 17, 1877. 
January 18, 1S78. 
March 29, 1878. 
July 5, 1878. 



PORTER COUNTY. 



William E. Finney- 

G.Black„ 

George 0. Mcsier 

Geoige W. Mosier ... 
John W.Roee 



Valparaiso 
Valparaiso 

Hebron 

Hebron 

Valparaiso 



April 4, 1S78. 
April 23, 1S78. 
May 4, 1878. 
May 4, 1878. 
July 19, 1878. 



POSEY COUNTY. 



Walter S. Jackson 

Elijah M. Spencer 

John B. Davis 

Milton W.Pearse 

Jonathan 1 1 . BurRson 
James Cross 



Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Vernon 
Wadesville. 



January 21, 1878. 
February 5, 187S. 
March 6, 1878. 
March 11, 1878. 
May 31, 1878. 
September 6, 1878. 



PULASKI COUNTY. 



John C. Nye. 
R.B.Stotta.... 



Winamac. 
Monterey . 



November 15, 1877. 
May 21, 1878. 



63 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



PUTNAM COUNTY. 



NAME. 



RESIDENCE. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



James T.Nutt 

Addison Daggy 

Thomas Hanna 

Silas A. Hays 

George W. Homan 

John H.S. Monnet 

William McK. Milligan 

George E. Blake 

Joseph Crow, Jr 

Horace James 

Jesse W.Weik 

James V.Durham 



Greencastle , 

Greencastle 

Greencastle 

Greencastle 

Portland Mills 

Quineey, Owen county 

Greencastle 

Greencastle 

Greencastle 

Greencastle 

Greencastle , 

Russell ville 



December 27, 1877. 
January 3, 1878. 
January 10, 1878. 
January 30, 1878. 
February 11, 1878. 
March 30, 1878. 
April 24, 1878. 
May 3, 1878. 
May G, 1878. 
June 7, 1878. 
June 20, 1878. 
June 21, 1878. 



RANDOLPH COUNTY. 



Henry Miller 

I. P. Watts 

Nathan T. Butts 

Webster Lambert .... 

Jacob H. Piatt 

Alonzo H. Patty 

Moorman Way 

Richard A. Leavell ... 
Thomas H.Spencer... 

James S. Engle 

F.A.Hay 

Silas A.Canada 

Lnrman W.Sherman 
Miles M.Holaday.... 



Trenton 

Winchester 
Winchester 
Union City 
Snow Hill.... 
Winchester 
Winchester 
Winchester 
Winchester 
Winchester 
Winchester . 
Winchester , 
Winchester 
Losanteville. 



November 6, 1877. 
January 21, 1878. 
February 23, 1878. 
February 27, 1878. 
March 4, 1878. 
March 14, 1878. 
April 16, 1878. 
April )9, 1878. 
May 6, 1878. 
September 11, 1878. 
September 11, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 
September 30, 1878. 



RIPLEY COUNTY. 



John St. Clair 

Emslev Sha!dav„ 

ObedWiFon ....". 

Thomas G. VanMeter. 

Adam Stockinger 

Benjamin F. Ferris.... 

Peter P. Cornet 

Benjamin H. Harrell.. 

David B.Abbott 

Charles B. Johnson.... 
John O. Cravins 



Delaware 

Rexville 

Versailles 

Holton 

Versailles 

Stinman 

New Marion 

Versailles 

Milan 

Napoleon 

Osgood 



February 7, 1873. 
Februar'v 15, 1878. 
■February 21, 1878. 
February 23, 1878. 
March 11, 1878. 
April 23, 1878. 
May 6, 187*. 
May 11, 1878. 
July 9, 1873. 
September 14, 1878. 
October 22, 1878. 



RUSH COUNTY. 



George W. Young 
John Q. Thomas.. 
Jesse J. Spann...., 

George Wilrse 

Robert E. Wilson. 
John Frazier 



Rushville 

Rush ville 
Rush ville 
Carthage . 
Arlington 
Rushville 



November 28, 1877. 
April 24, 1878. 
April 24, 1878. 
Mav 22, 1878. 
June 14, 1878. 
October 14, 1878. 



64 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



SCOTT COUNTY. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 


Weston C. Finley 






Austin Mav 12. 1878. 









SHELBY COUNTY. 



John W. Tomlinson.. 

James C. Dugan 

Charles Major 

Henry H. Dougherty 
Einmett S. Stilwell.... 

John A.Tindall 

David L. Wilson 

Edmund K. Adams.... 

Louis T. Michener 

Joseph W. Thompson. 

John A. Gore 

John S. Ferris 



Shelbyville. 
Fairland .... 
Shelbvville. 
Shelbyville. 
Shelbyville. 
Shelbyville. 
Shelbvville. 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville. 
Shelbyville. 
Waldron .... 
Shelbyville. 



November 21, 1877. 
November 28, 1877. 
December 17, 1877. 
March 5, 1878. 
March 8,1878. 
April 25, 1878. 
June 18, 1878. 
June 18, 1878. 
October 21, 1878. 
October 21 ,1878. ' 
October 22, 1878. 
October 29, 1878. 



SPENCEE COUNTY. 



W.H.Blount , 

Charles Jones..; , 

Levi Haines 

George W. McVey.. 

Elbert M. Swan 

H. M. Logsdon 

Thomas E. Snyder.., 
Francis J. Reinhard 



Rockport 

Dale 

Newtonville 

Midway 

Rockport 

Rockport 

Rockport 

Rockport 



February 25. 1878. 
March 18, 1878. 
Mav 2, 1878. 
May 2, 1878. 
May 6, 1878. 
May 13, 1878. 
August 19, 1878. 
August 22, 1878. 



STAEKE COUNTY. 



JosephusR. Peelle 

Joseph B. Hoag 

John McLaughlin 

Israel Uncapher 

Thomas J. Thompson 



Knox 

Knox 

San Pierre... 
Grovertown 
Knox 



Jamiarv 10, 1878. 
January 18, 1878. 
April 24, 1878. 
July 15, 1878. 
July 24, 1878. 



ST. JOSEPH COUNTY. 



A. Hodson 

Samuel D.Graham... 
Solomon W. Palmer , 

John E.Fisher , 

John J. Schindler .... 

Lucius Hubbard 

John A. Hibberd 

Henry B. Higgins ... 
Henry A. Sehatt'er.... 
Jacob D. Henderson . 

Norman S. Miller 

Jacob C. Meller 



Mishawaka 

Walkerton 

South Bend 

South Bond 

Mishawaka 

South Bend 

South Bond 

South Bend 

Granger 

South Bend 

North Liberty 
North Liberty 



November 24, 1877. 
December 20, 1877. 
January 10, 1878. 
February 18, 1878. 
March 15, 1878. 
March 25, 1878. 
March 27, 1878. 
Mav 28, 1878. 
June IS, 1878. 
July 24, 1878. 
September 18, 1878. 
September 28, 1878. 



65 



NOTAEIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



STEUBEN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 






November 9, 1877. 


DoakR. Best 


Am-il 13, 1878. 






Julv 24, 1878. 






July 29, 1878. 
August 22, 1878- 


William B. McOonnell 









SULLIVAN COUNTY. 













January 18, 1878. 
February 23, 1878. 
March 4, 1878. 














May 10, 1878. 







SWITZEELAND COUNTY. 



Frank L. Hastings 
George H. iteeney 
Merit W.Tague... 

John Orem 

James A. Watson.. 



Vevay 
Patriot 
Vevay 
Vevay 
Patriot 



November 24, 1877. 
December 8, 1877. 
January 5, 1878. 
September 18, 1878. 
October 26, 1878. 



TIPPECANOE COUNTY. 



JohnT.McHughy.. 

"Van S. Burtou 

Hood P. Loveland ... 
Charles P. Simpson . 

John W.Bailey 

Mark Jones 

John K. Gitty 

Charles H. Pierce.... 
Samuel K. Richards 
James H. Rinard .... 
George J. Eacock .... 
James M. Caldwell.. 

Joseph Yundt 

William S. Potter.... 
Jesse T. Spaulding.. 
Joseph P. McHugh . 



Lafayette 
Dayton ... 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 



November 19, 1877. 
November 20, 1877. 
November 24, 1877. 
February 2, 1878. 
February 7, 1878. 
April 2, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
April 23, 1878. 
Mav 1, 1878. 
June 15, 1878. 
July 24, 1878. 
August 31, 1878. 
September 3, 1878. 
September 18, 1878. 
October 1, 1878. 
October 26, 1878. 



TIPTON COUNTY. 



William Shope 

James M. Maxtindale . 

George Gifford 

Leander Goodwin 

C. M. Puntenney 

Elijah B. Martindale.. 

William H. Clark 

Charley W.Swain 



Kempton 

Tipton 

Tipton 



Tipton.... 
Tipton.... 
Tipton...., 
Windfall. 



5 — Sec. State. 



November 15, 1877. 
January 4, 187S. 
Januarv 18, 1878. 
March 21, 1878. 
April 25, 1878. 
Mav 1, 1878. 
May 27, 1878. 
August 12, 1878. 



66 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



UNION COUNTY. 



NAME. 



RESIDENCE. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



Leland H. Stanford.... 

Emmit B.Gould 

Americus E. Johnson 



Liberty 
Liberty- 
Liberty 



March 25, 1878. 
Julv 6, 1878. 
October 13, 1873. 



VANDERBURGH COUNTY. 







November 24, 1877. 












January 3, 1873. 






M. R. Anthes 




February 4, 1878. 
February 15, 1878. 
February 21, 1878. 
February 23, 1878. 
March 1, 1878. 














Charles H. Rutterfield 








March 13, 1878. 






May 21, 1878. 






June 10, 1878. 






June 11, 1878. 






August 13, 1878. 
August 19, 1878: 
August 19, 1878. 
September 4, 1878. 
September 14, 1878. 
September 25, 1878. 
October 9, 1878. 

































VERMILLION COUNTY. 



John Haines 

H.H.Conley 

John D. Cushman. 



Clinton ... 
Newport . 



Mav 3, 1878. 
July 15, 1878. 
August 18, 1875. 



VIGO COUNTY. 



Hugh L.Smith , 

B.V.Marshall 

Obediah C. Fugas 

John H. Tremont 

J. Irving Riddle 

Tighlman Tillotson ... 

James H. Turner 

Isaac H. Royse 

Edward J. Barry 

William E. Donahoe .. 

Luther G.Hoge 

David N.Taylor 

Bezaleel Holmes 

Theodore Markle 

George W. Kleiser 

James Thomas Moore 
Horace B.Jones 













January 3, 1878. 
January 28, 1878. 








March 5,' 1878. 




February 15, 1878. 
March 7, 1878. 






March 8, 1878. 




March 13, 1878. 




March 28, 1873. 




April 11, 1878. 
May 15, 1878. 
Mav 17, 1878. 








May 24, 1 878. 
July 12, 1878. 
August 9, 1878. 







67 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



WABASH COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 




South Wabash 


February 4, 1878. 
February 23, 1878. 


W T Bope 








March 4, 1878. 






May 6, 187S. 






June 27, 1878. 






October 11, 1878. 









WARREN COUNTY. 



Henry C. Johnson 

Ashley R. Cadwallader 
Charles H. Hoffman .... 

Alvin High 

Benjamin R.Gregory... 
W. L. Rayburn 



Marshfield. .... 
Williamsport 
Williamsport 
Williamsport 
Williamsport 
State Line .... 



April 12, 1878. 
June 13, 187*. 
June 18, 1878. 
July 1, 1878. 
August 8,1878. 
August 17, 1878. 



WARRICK COUNTY. 



James H. Tillman 

Campbell Kirkpatrick 

Luther McCoy 

W. H.T.Davis 

Oliver J. Tavlor 

William H.Patterson 
J.M.Zimmerman 



Polkpatch 
Lynnville, 
Baonville. 

Canal 

Boonville. 
Boonville. 
Lynnville. 



January 8, 1878. 
April 4, 1878. 
April 5, 1878. 
April 11, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
July 24, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 



WASHINGTON COUNTY. 



John C. Lawler , 

James Mcintosh... 
Henry A.Smith... 
William A.Elliott 
John Q. Voyles 



Salem 

Harrtinsburg 
Saltilloville.. 
Saltilloville .. 
Salem 



November 24, 1S77. 
January 29, 1878. 
April 12, 1868. 
April 17, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 



WAYNE COUNTY. 



John L. Yaryan 

Thomas Newby 

Charles H. Burchenal.. 
William H. Bradbury 

L.Monroe Develin 

Harrison Gabel 

William H. Study 

Charles E. Boston 

James J. Kussel 

Samuel A. Forkner 

William H. Foulk 

James T. Pretlow 

Olive H. Boaue 

Charles A.Hill 

Nathan D. Halford 

Joseph B.Craighead... 
Jonathan W.Newman 
John W.Scott 



Richmond 

Cambridge City. 

Richmond 

Richmond 

Cambridge City 

Richmond 

New Gordon .... 

Richmond 

Richmond 

Richmond 

Richmond 

Cambridge City 

Richmond 

Milton 

Economy 

Richmond 

Richmond 

Dublin 



November 20, 1877. 
December 22, 1877. 
December 24, 1877. 
January 3, 1878. 
February 4, 1878. 
February 21, 1878. 
March 5, 1878. 
ADiil 11, 1878. 
April 29, 1878. 
May 10, 1878. 
July 2, 1878. 
September 2, 1878. 
September 17, 1878. 
September 21, 1878. 
September 25, 1878. 
October 9, 1878. 
October 15, 1878. 
October 18, 1878. 



68 



NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



WELLS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 




Bluffton 


December 3, 1877. 




Bluffton 


January 14, 1878. 






February 21, 1878. 




Bluffton 


April 25, 1878. 


Michael C. Blue 


Bluffton 


April 26, 1878. 





WHITE COUNTY. 



Thomas B. Davis 

William W. McCullock 

Charles S.Fogg 

James H.Turpie 

William H. Dague 

Jeremiah E. Dunham... 
Robert L. Cox 



Brookston., 
Monticello 
Bradford.. 

Monon 

Monticello 
Reynolds . 
Monticello 



January 19, 1878, 
February 7, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
June 10, 1878. 
September 25, 1878. 
October 18, 1878. 
October 28, 1878. 



WHITLEY COUNTY. 



Oliver P. Stewart.... 

Geo.F. Birt 

Charles F.Hollis.... 
John W.Hatsell.... 
Wooeter M. Ireland 



Columbia City 

Larwille 

Laiwille 

Columbia City 
Columbia City 



November 30, 1877. 
January 3, 1878. 
January 25, 1878. 
May 30, 1878. 
June 10, 1878. 



69 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

Commissioned from October 31, 1877, to October 31, 1878. 
ADAMS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


TOWNSHIP. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 






April 12, 1878. 




Root 


April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
AprU 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
June 17, 1878 




F. W. Gollinger 


Reble 






Reble 






















W. H. H. France 






Mitcheal Eley 
























T. Hook 




























Julv 5, 1878. 






July 6, 1878. 











ALLEN COUNTY. 



*0. D.Rogers 

*Isaiah Bausserman... 

*Conrad Schwauz 

*Mathias Hollopeter... 

Luke Lavarrway 

Allen Doctor 

Conrad Swartz 

William T. Pratt 

Michael Tarcy 

Daniel Ryan 

John Small 

Calvin Thomas 

►Samuel Grover 

Joseph W. Jones 

Andrew Jackson.. 

Simeon W. Stonder 

George W. Kell 

George W.Johnson 

Michael Lindersmith.. 

Isaiah Bausserman 

Frederick Meads 

Jacob Friedt 

William Renheldefer.. 

•Charles W. Lindsey 

Mathias Hollepeter 

Amie Chausse 

Luke Laranway 

Thomas Mcintosh 

ManvUleN. Dunton.., 

Alanson C. Griffin , 

Charles F. Foulks 

Jasper W. Jones 

John Shaffer 



Adams 

Jackson 

Adams 

Cedar Creek- 



January 
April 9 
April 12 
AprU 12 
April 17 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
AprU 18 
April 18 
April 18 
AprU 18 
AprU 18 
AprU 18 
April 18 
April 18 
AprU 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
AprU 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
AprU 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 



19, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 



^Appointed. 



70 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



BARTHOLOMEW COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



Samuel H. Dodd 

Hugh McCalip 

William H. Butler 

John Christian 

Franklin Miller 

John L. Perry 

James F. Noblett 

John Edwards 

Justus 01mstea,d 

James M. Jordan 

John Ahern 

J. Thompson New 

Hezekiah Hedges 

William H. Chrittenden 

James N. Challie 

Oscar MeCullough 

Washington Polen 

William A. Abett 

Emanuel H.Kinney 

David Newsom 



DATE OF COMMISSION, 



Haw Creek 
Haw Creek 
Flatrock.... 

Jackson 

Jackson 

Wayne 

Wayne 

Cliffy 

Ohio 

Union 

Union 

Clay 

Clay 

Rock Creek 
Rock Creek 
Harrison ... 
Sand Creek 
Columbus.. 
Columbus.. 
Columbus.. 



April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1873. 


April 9, 


1S78. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


18'/ 8. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


1878. 


April 9, 


18/8 



BENTON COUNTY. 



Clinton Baker 

Miles A. Barber... 

Rinalds Sutton 

Thomas Parks 

Austin V. Flint... 

John Burns 

John H. Calias 

Sylvester King 

James Quinn 

James D.Smith ... 

J.F.Smith 

Jacob Miller 

Samuel A. Parker 
F.W. Hatch 



Grant 

Grant 

Gibson 

Gibson 

Center 

Center 

Bichland 

Richland 

Boliver 

York 

York 

Oak Grove 

Hickory Grove 
Richland 



April 19, 
April 19, 
April 19, 
April 19, 
April 19, 
April 19, 
April 19, 
April 19, 
April 19, 
April 19, 
A|jrill9, 
April 19, 
April 27, 
June 18, 



1878. 
1S78. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1S78. 
1878. 
1S78. 
1878. 



BLACKFORD COUNTY. 



William W. Campbell 

Ransom R. Boylee 

Lewis Reeves 



Licking 

Washington 
Jackson 



April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1873. 



71 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



BOONE COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



George B. Richardson 

David M. Evans 

Samuel McCord 

David Hazlerigg 

Fielding Denny 

Caseius M. Wynkoop . 
Benjamin F. Davis .... 

Jonah Byrkett 

David W.Davis 

Isaac Leap 

William 6. Gibson 

George MeKeehan .... 

Daniel W. Jessie 

Abraham Irwin 



Marion 

Clinton 

Washi ngton 
Washington 

Jefferson 

Center 

Union 

Eagle 

Perry 

Perry 

Jackson 

Jackson 

Jackson 

North 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878, 
il, 1878, 
11, 1878, 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 



BKOWN COUNTY. 



Riley Gordon 

Henry W.Cook 

Lawson Hopper 

William Stump 

William Davis 

James Mcllvain 

Ambrose A. Hutson 
William Hendrick . 



Jackson 

Van Bnren., 
Washington 

Jackson 

Johnson 

Hamblen 

Hamblen...., 
Johnson 



January 4, 187S. 
April 11, 1S78. 
April 11, 1878. 
April 11, 1878. 
April 11, 1878. 
11 April 11, 1878. 
April 11, 1878. 
April 22, 1878. 



CARROLL COUNTY. 



George Karns 

David T. Hilderbrand .. 

James W. Arnott„ 

Robert Allen 

John 8. Pearson ►. 

Richard Coble 

John M. Groniger 

John S.Hunt 

Joshua M. He;idrix 

W.H.Reppetto 

Joseph W.Gwinn 

M. J.McGreeney 

John Q. Miller 

Milton A. Maxon 

Solomon P. Winters 

Norton G.Jones 

Lewis Heinkle 

Daniel Hostler 

James M. Shaffer „ 



Jackson 

Deer Creek.. 
Deer Creek.. 
Deer Creek.. 

Adams 

Adams 

Washington 
Carrolton .... 
Carrolton .... 

Monroe 

Burlington.. 
Rock Creek. 

Madison 

Tippecanoe., 

Clay 

Clay 

Washington 
Democrat .... 
Democrat . ., 



April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 



1878 
1878, 
1878 
1878 
1878 
187S 
1878 
1878 
1878, 
1878 
1878 
187S 
1S78 
1S78 
1878 
1878 
1878, 
1878, 
1878, 



72 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



CASS COUNTY. 



NAME. 


TOWNSHIP. DATE OF COMMISSION. 




Clay 


April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 








Clinton 






April 9, 1878. 




Eel 


April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 














April 9, 1878. 


F. W. Grant 


Noble 


April 9, 1878. 


D.W.Tippett 


Noble 


April 9, 1878. 




Tipton 


April 9, 1878. 




Tipton 


April 9, 1878. 






July 25, 1878. 







CLARK COUNTY. 



James M.Moore 

Michael Connelly .. 
Ephraim Keigwin.. 
Oswald C. Wooley .. 

Jesse C. Grimes 

James Wilson 

Edward Covert 

John C. McCormick 
John T. Patterson .. 
James W.Jackson.. 

John V. Clapp 

William King 

Levi P.King 

Edward Dold 

Thomas Littell 

T. P. Weir 



Jeffersonville 
Jeffersonville 
Jeffersonville 
Jeffersonville 

Utica 

Charlestown . 
Charlestown . 

Owen 

Bethlehem.... 
Bethlehem. ... 

Oregon 

Monroe 

Carr 

Silver Creek 

Union 

Union 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 



CLAY COUNTY. 



Zimri Cooprider 

Lewis O. Schultz 

John B. Messick 

Joseph D. Carter 

Jacob Bazzard 

William Easter 

Edward Hamilton.... 

Joseph Eckert 

William R. Mershm . 

William Morton , 

Robert S. Kellam 

Samuel T. Waters .... 
William M. Gwins... 
Napoleon Gillespie .. 

John M. Bailey 

George P. Shaw 

John Travis 

E.H.Carlisle 



Harrison 

Brazil 

Washington... 
Dick Johnson 

Harrison 

Dick Johnson 

Perry 

Jackson 

Jackson 

Van Buren..., 

Cass 

Sugar Ridge... 
Sugar Ridge... 

Posey 

Posey 

Brazil 

Washington.. 
Van Buren... 



April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
Apiil 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
June 22, 1878. 



73 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



CLINTON COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



George C. Harbaugh 

Henry Griee 

James P. Haekard ... 

John C. Rodgers 

Jacob E. Bogh 

Robert O. Brooks 

Frederick Boust 

Charles Birden 

Samuel Hard ing 

Henry Strange 

Henry C. Jackson ... 



Perry 

Washington 

Madison 

Boss 

Boss 

Michigan .... 
Michigan .... 
Sugar Creek 

Kirklin 

Jackson 

Johnson 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



9, 1878 
9, 1878 
9, 1878 
9, 1878 
9, 1878 
9, 1878 
9, 1878 
9, 1878 
9, 1878 
9, 1878 
9, 1878 



CRAWFORD COUNTY. 



George E.Sharon 

George Mills 

James C. Mills 

John H. McMiekle 

John A. Cunningham 
William F. Eichards... 

Joel Walls „ 

John Martin 

Perry Smelser 

Levi B. Riddle 

Hiram B. Meglin 

H.B.Meylin 



Jennings 

Whisky Run . 
Whisky Run . 

Sterling 

Sterling 

Sterling 

Johnson 

Union 

Union 

Boone 

Alton 



April 15, 1878 
April IS, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
September 13, 



DAVIESS COUNTY. 



Burrell T. Meredith. 

Richard M. Clark 

Benjamin F. Prater... 

Henry P. Dixon 

Eliphalet N. Stearns. 

Joseph J. Farrell 

Benjamin A. Pate.... 

Samuel A. Taylor 

Abraham H. Love.... 

Samuel Cornett 

William G. Comber... 
L.L.Dilly 



Washington.. 

Harrison 

-Reese 

Barr 

Barr 

Barr 

"VanBurcn 

Madison 

Madison 

Steele 

Steele 



April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
Anril 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 



74 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



DEARBORN COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



William H. Blasdel.... 

George Bowlby...-. 

Jeremiah Crosby 

Benjamin C. Eversole 

Elliott Wills 

Virgil Dowden 

Philip Becker 

William Donolon 

Russel S. True 

William L. II. Given.. 

Washington Stark 

Janiee House 

Azel Hauk 

Philip Opp 

John V. Canfield 

J. W. Lamhert8on 

William Lazenby 

Sebastian Green 

Isaac R. Dunaway 

Andrew Young 



Jackson 

Harrison 

Lawrenceburgh 
Lawrenceburgh 

Clay 

York 

York 

Kelso 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Center 

Hcgan 

Harrison 

Ceaser Creek .... 

Sparta 

Sparta 

Miller 

Lawrenceliurgh 
Lawrtneeburyh 
Greendale 



April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18 
April 18, 
April 18 
April 18 
June 17, 1878. 
September 18 



. 18 
, 1878, 
, 187b 
, 1878 
, 1878 
, 1878 
, 1878, 
, 1878, 
, 1878 
, 1878 
, 1878, 
, l!>78. 
, 1878, 
, 1878, 
, 1878 
, 1878, 
, 1878, 
, 1878, 



, W? 



DECATUR COUNTY. 



Frank W. Weadon.. 

Oliver Goedard 

Daniel Thorp. 

Stephen Ridlen 

Eli T. J. Jordan 

William W. Kilcy.. 

Jacob Grant 

Robert Kennedv.... 
William F. Bobbin 
Charles C. Throp.... 
John Castor 



Washington 

Clinton 

Clinton 

Adams , 

Adiims 

Adams , 

Clav 

Clay 

Sand Creek. 
Salt Creek... 
Salt Creek... 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



29, 1878. 
29, 1878. 
29, 1878. 
29, 1878. 
29, 1878. 
29, 1>S78. 
29, 1878. 
29, 1S78. 
29, 1878. 
29, 1878. 
29, 1878. 



DeKALB COUNTY. 



Perry Fitch 

Jonathan Shull.. 

J.B.White 

David McDannel 
John R. Young.... 

John J.Sive 

John Wilson 

Jacob Walborn.... 

John Butt 

Oliver P. Smith .. 

Isaac Ditmars 

Christian Smith.. 
Eber W. Coll 



Butler 

Concord 

Concord 

Stafford 

Wellington 
Wellington 
Wellington 

Union 

Union 

Union 

Keper 

Fairfield ... 
Troy 



April 13, 
April 13, 
April 18, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 13, 
April 18, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 18, 



187S. 
1878. 
1878. 
1S78. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 



75 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



DELAWARE COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



Amos Witon 

Orson M.Tyler 

George Darraeott 

Benjamin G. Cunningham 

George W. Carter 

Duncan Williams 

Isaiah Gay man 

Lee Scott 

Noah Han old 

George Yeunce 

John Knowles 

Bichard T. Shinier 

John Tuttle 

Samuel Meyers 

Archibald Bergdoll 

James M. Campbell 



Centre 

Centre 

Centre 

Perry 

Union 

Hamilton.... 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Monroe 

Niles 

Salem 

Mt. Pleasant 
Mt. Pleasant 
Delaware .... 
Delaware .... 
Liberty 



April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 4S78. 
May 2, 1878. 
May 2, 1878. 
Mav 2, 1878. 
May 2, 1878. 
May 2, 1878. 
May 2, 1878. 
May 2, 1878. 
May 2, 1878. 
May 2, 1S78. 
May 2, 1878. 
May 2, 1878. 
May 2, 1878. 
May 2, 1878. 



DUBOIS COUNTY. 



Henry W. Harrison.. 
James P. Harhinson 

John Echridler 

George W. Harkios. 

James Corn 

Patrick L. Sweeny.... 
Herman Klensner.... 
W.H.H.Penniek .... 
Jonathan K.Brown.. 

Daniel Merriman 

John F. Scharz 

William G.Harris.... 

T. H. Williams 

Daniel Reutpoblse.... 
A.Fischer 



Columbia ... 
Harbinson , 
Harbinson . 

Boone 

Banebridge 
Banebridge 

Marion 

Hall 

Hall 

Jackson 

Jackson 

Patcka 

Cass 

Cass 

Ferdinand . 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1S78. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1S78. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 



ELKHAET COUNTY. 



George W. Hat tie 

Thomas G. Davis .... 

John W.Lutz 

Leonard German 

Andrew Elliott 

Frederick Copeland . 
Benjamin F. Connell 
Leander Anderson ... 

Gordon Bearh 

John W.Albin 

David Snavely 

Allen Gillett 

Frederick Ott 

David Eddleman 

Jeremiah Exer 

Milton J. Beck 

Alpheus Patterson.... 

George Goerner 

Martin H. Morlin .... 

John Hilbish 

Fin ley C. Nicholson.. 

Daniel Bassett 

Edward M.Kennedy 
Gebur M. Smith 



Jackson 

Concord 

Clinton 

Clinton 

Middlebury 
Middlebury 
Jefferson.... 
Harrison.... 

Osalo 

Union 

Benton 

Benton 

Benton 

Banjo 

Elkhart 

Yoik 

York 

York 

Locke 

Washington 
Washington 
Washington 

Clinton , 

Clinton , 



April 13 
April 13 
April 13. 
April 13. 
April 13. 
April 13 
April 13 
April 13. 
April 13, 
April 13. 
April 13. 
April 13, 
April 13 
April 13. 
April 13! 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13; 
April 13. 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13. 
June 19, 
June 19, 



1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1S78. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1S78. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878- 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 



76 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



FAYETTE COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



Basel McCann 

James Simpson 

Joseph P. Daniels.... 
John W. Hannah..., 

James Cotton 

William H. Hatton 



Connersville 

Columbia 

Orange 

Harrison 

Columbia 

Connersville 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



April 11, 1878. 
April 11, 1878. 
April 11, 1878. 
April 11, 1878. 
April 11, 1878. 
September 3, 1878. 



FLOYD COUNTY. 



Thomas Collins 

Lawrence P. Huckely 

James McCaffney 

General W. Daily 

John B. Hancock 

Lachorah Ward , 

William H. Ash by 

Marion W. Smith 



New Albany 
New Albany 
New Albany 

Franklin 

Franklin 

Lafayette 

Greenville ... 
Greenville .... 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 



FOUNTAIN COUNTY. 



Jacob Ewbank 

George Martin 

Isaac AUen 

John B. Schwin 

John F. Davidson 

Ephraim Blackford 

Samuel VanFleet 

Timothy Murphy 

James H. Yoliva 

James D. Griffith 

William Trullinger 

Jonathan C. Campbell 

William H.H.Stephenson. 

Elijah Earl 

Cyrus Crane 

Hugh P. McCray 



Mill Creek. 
Mill Creek. 

Fulton 

Wabash 

Cain 

Cain 

VanBuren... 

Troy 

Richland... 
Shawnee .... 

Logan 

Logan 

Logan 

Davis 

Davis 



April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1876 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
September 13, 



1878. 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 



Frank Geis 

Aaron B. Line 

Jacob B. Blazier 

Julius C. Burgoyne 

James Gillespie 

Casper M. Gaupel.... 

William Meyer 

Ezra Portteus 

Martin Fischer 



Brookville . 
Brookville 

Bath 

Laurel 

Matamora.. 

Ray 

Ray 

Springfield 
Salt Creek 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 



77 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



FULTON COUNTY. 



NAMES. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



William Wallace 

Charles J. Stradley 

Jamee C. Thompson... 

William L. Koons 

Charles Nelson 

Levi Bureh 

Abner Wood 

Peter Meredith- 

Hiram Horn 

Alfred Martin 

O. B.Holman 

Michael Walters 

George W. Beeber 

L. B. Stonaker 

Lemuel Stahl 

John Myers 

George W. McClatchy 

Daniel Bishop 

John Urbin 



Boch ester 

Rochester 

Rochester 

Rochester 

Henry 

Henry 

New Castle 

New Castle 

New Castle 

Liberty 

Richland 

Richland 

Richland 

Aubbenaubbee 
Aubbenaubbee 

Union 

Wayne 

Wayne 

Wayne 



February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 
February 



, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 



GIBSON COUNTY. 



Abraham H.Jones.. 
Charles H. Sharmer 

Jamee H- Clark 

Alfred Simpson 

John D. Kaufman ... 

Thomas M. Lee 

Calvin O'Niell 

John Beckner 

James E. Chappel ... 
Charles W. Loper...., 



White River 

Barton 

Montgomery 
Montgomery 

Patoka 

Washington.. 
Washington.. 

Wabash 

Columbia 

Center 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 



GRANT COUNTY. 



Elihu J. Weever 

Alfred Pugh 

Benjamin Abert 

Lewis C. Pence , 

John R. Hannah 

James H. Richardson 

Elijah Roberds 

John G.King , 

James A. Stretch 

John D.Timony 

Josiah Haifley , 

Moses Bradford 

Jacob S. Barley 

Elijah Weesner 



Franklin 

Jefferson 

Liberty 

Sims 

Green 

Jefferson 

Monroe 

Pleasant 

Mill 

Center 

Richland.... 
Washington 

Pleasant 

Franklin 



April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
June IS, 1878. 



78 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



GKEENE COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



George W. Osborn.... 

John Emery 

Benjamin F. George 

Allen Crow , 

Thomas K.Cook , 

David Sullivan 

John Dorrough 

Edward Beck 

Henry Baker 

John S. Page 

Anthony P. Laffoon 

Thomas Carney 

Daniel Eiggs 

William L. Hastings 



Highland.... 

Jackson 

Jackson 

Center 

Beech Creek 
Beech Creek 
Highland .... 
Eel River .... 

Fairplay 

Stafford 

Smith 

Cass 

Jefferson 

Cass 



April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1873, 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878. 
July 2, 1878. 



HAMILTON COUNTY. 



Hiram G. French.. 

Levi Cook 

William C. Cloud.. 

Amos Esken 

Pulaski W. Elder.. 

Moses McCarty , 

Samuel Patterson 
Charles C. Jackson 

Lewis McCarty 

Isaac D. Finley 

William Martz 

James Baker 

James Rondebush 



Noblesville... 
Noblesville... 
Washington.. 

Clay 

Delaware 

Fall Creek ... 
Fall Creek ... 

Wayne 

Wavne , 

White River 

Jackson 

Adams 

Wayne , 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



17, 1878. 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878. 
19, 1S78. 



HANCOCK COUNTY. 



David Newlin 

Elijah Tyner 

Benjamin F. Reeves 

Edward Rose 

James S. Thompson 

Lysander Sparks 

John W.Walker 

William R.Terrell.., 

Ira Beoil 

George Kingery 

John M. McKelvey., 

Emel Lenz , 

Oliver P. Hastings... 



Blue River.. 
Blue River.. 

Brown 

Black Creek 

Center 

Center 

Center 

Green 

Jackson 

Sugar Creek 
Sugar Creek. 

Vernon 

Vernon 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878, 
1', 1878, 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 
11, 1378, 
11, 1878, 
11, 1878 
11, 1878 



79 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



HARBISON COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



James L.Morris 

Smith Askrin 

James Cunningham 

Hilton D. Harris 

James P. Babcock ... 

Jacob Zenor 

William Thomas 

John Endres, Sr 

John Hartman 

George W.Jones 

Henry Keen 

Robert Hedges 

John Johnson 

Elbert Murr 

John Colin 

J.H.Felier 



Harrison... 
Harrison... 
Harrison... 

Boone 

Posey 

Franklin... 
Franklin... 
Franklin... 

Morgan 

Blue River 

Taylor 

Webster ... 
Webster ... 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Scotl 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 



HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Simon Rammel 

William R. Barker 

Thomas Archer 

D.H. Walts 

Amos I. Wills 

Thomas Mendenhall... 

Joseph Williams 

Elisha McAninch 

John Campbell 

Anthony W. Kelley ... 

Joseph Allison 

W.J. K.P.Jones 

James M. Duzan 

Thomas C. Dollarhide 

James Smoot 

laaac W.Gray 

Thomas B.Hall 



Center 

Washington 

Guilford 

Liberty 

Liberty 

Clay 

Clay 

Franklin 

Franklin 

Marion 

Marion 

Eel River .... 

Middle 

Brown 

Brown 

Lincoln , 

Union 



April 16, 1878 
April 16, 1878 
April 16, 1878 
April 16, 1878 
April 16, 1878 
April 16, 1878 
April 16, 1878 
April 16, 1878 
April 16, 1878, 
April 16, 1878 
April 16, 1878 
April 16, vm 
April 16, 1878 
April 16, 1875 
April 16, 1878, 
April 16, 1878. 
June 21, 1878. 



HENRY COUNTY. 



William B. Gray 

John A. Deem 

Robert M. Russell 

James M. Smith 

John S. Byer 

William F.Walker 

John D. Cooper 

Alexander Personett ., 

Joseph Butler 

John W.Tfays 

Abraham Wrightman 

August Snodgrass 

Alfred Welker 

Lofney Hale , 

Jacob H. Kilmer 

Thomas L. Fowler 

Augustus Snodgrass... 
Edward Burris 



Wayne 

Wayne , 

Franklin ..., 

Dudley 

Henry 

Henry 

Harrison 

Fall Creek .. 
Spiceland .... 
Spiceland .... 
Blue River. 

Liberty 

Liberty 

Jefferson 

Stony Creek 
Greensboro. 

Liberty 

Liberty 



April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
June 14, 1878 
September 13 



1878. 



80 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



HOWAED COUNTY. 



NAME. 


TOWNSHIP. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 






April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 








Clay 


April 9, 1878. 






April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 






John Stiffler 








April 9, 1878. 




Taylor 


April 9, 1878. 
May 9, 1878. 











HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 



John Hackett 

Alfred S. Goodwin 

William A. Anderson 

Michael Voght 

Norton 6. Whitehead 

Jasper H.Terrell 

A. L. Thompson 

Henry Ketner 

Samuel J. Trimble 

John Hultz 



Jackson...... 

Jackson 

Clear Creek 

Dallas 

Rock Creek, 
Lancaster ... 

Polk 

Wayne 

Jefferson.... 
Salamonia.. 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 
12, 1878 



JACKSON COUNTY. 



Harrison Durham 
James M. Smith... 

Wyatt Rucker 

Samuel Gillespie.. 

John Littell 

Harrison Love 

Wells I. Reeves 

John Lorster 

Larry Loster 

Noah I. Weddle .. 
Joseph E. Bower... 

Elisha L. Davis 

Isaac Smith 

John Goble 

William R. Combs 



Driftwood.... 
Grassy Fork 
Grassy Fork 
Brownstown 
Brownstown 
Washington. 

Jackson 

Redding 

Redding 

Carr 

Owen 

Owen 

Salt Creek.... 
Salt Creek.... 
Salt Creek.... 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 



81 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



JASPER COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



Turner A. Knox 

Ebenezer Peregrine. 

Miles Bisher 

James R. Guild , 

Elias Marion 

(jeorge Seitzmeyer.. 

John Vant Wood 

David James 

T.W.Mauck 

William W.Jones... 

Isaac Biggs 

August Stinson 

John A.Benson 

Benjamin B. Jeffries 

Jacob Jones 

Nathan I.Bates 



Hanging Grove 
Hanging Grove 

Gillman 

Gillman 

Barkley , 

Jordan 

Marion 

Marion 

Newton 

Kankakee 

Kankakee 

Wheatfield 

Milroy 

Carpenter 

Carpenter 

Carpenter 



April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 



1878. 
1878 
1878 
1S78 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 



JAY COUNTY. 



Prank King 

Israel Allman 

John Sutton 

John Rhodes 

John Steed 

Adelma Loftin 

William Grist 

Isaac Sammans 

William B. Atkinson 
William P. Bishop.... 

Joseph Carle 

Joseph G. Gosch 

George Kranor 

Cornelius E. Coder ... 

John Ewald 

Jacob Butcher 



Richland... 
Richland... 

Knox 

Jefferson .... 
Jefferson... 

Penn 

Penn 

Wayne 

Wayne , 

Bear Creek 

Pike 

Pike 

Madison ... 

Noble 

Wabash 

Wabash 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1S78 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13. 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 
13, 1878 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 



Robert Frost 

William Johnson 

Thompson A. Wrav . 
Gamaliel T. Warfield 

James Kiser 

Jesse H. Clinee 

Joseph Downey 

G.L.Ford 

Bennett Fuell 

William H. Clegg 

Mitchell M. Rodgers., 
Charles L. Hawkins . 
John H. Brindley .... 



Madison . 
Madison . 
Madison . 
Shelby.... 
Monroe ... 
Lancaster 
Lancaster 
Smyrna.... 
Graham... 
Saluda.... 
Hanover . 
Milton .... 
Milton 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



17, 1878 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878 
17, 1S78 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 



6 — Sec. State. 



82 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



JENNINGS COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF -COMMISSION. 



John Baridon 

George Norris 

Andrew Bauman.... 
William H. Bivus .., 
William B. Hagins . 

James I. Smith 

George W.Cook 

Aaron Parker 

Isaiah L. Green 

Patrick McNulty 

David Hulse 

John B.Littell 

John Tobias , 

James Barclay 

Francis M. Johnson.. 

August Pfitzer , 

Henry C. Hause 

James S. Smith 

Eliab M. Thompson.. 



Spenser 

Center 

Center 

Center 

Vernon 

Vernon 

Camel 

Camel 

Geneva 

Geneva 

Geneva 

Sand Creek... 
Montgomery 

Columbia 

Bigger 

Lovett 

Spencer 

Vernon 



April 17, 1S7S. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. . 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1S78. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1S7S. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
June 14, 1878. 
September 13, 1878. 



JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Allen Sexton 

Oliver H. P. Smiley... 

William Small 

Daniel Britton 

Egbert F. Pritchard . 
William D. Willard . 

Morgan Pitcher '.. 

John W.Smith 

Bufus Williams 

James H. Coley 

George W. McClellan 

Charles Farmer 

William T. Rivers.... 

James B. Paris 

Landon Eobards 

William H. Barnett . 
Townsend Wilson .... 



Franklin 

Franklin 

Franklin 

Nineveh , 

Nineveh 

Blue Eiver... 

Henslev 

Clark ..". 

Clark 

Pleasant 

Pleasant 

Pleasant 

Union 

Union 

White Eiver 

Franklin 

Pleasant 



April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
April 18, 
June 5, 
June 14, 



1S78. 
1S78. 
1878. 
1S78. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 



KNOX COUNTY. 



D.S. Howard 

Ezra D. Helburn 

Chris. Baker 

Edmond Polk 

Reason R. Sproatt.. 

John L.Mullen 

John N.Hart 

Charles N. Hannah 
William M. Setzer.. 

John S. Morgan 

George S. Weaver... 



Vigo 

Vigo 

Widner.. 
Widner.. 
Busseron 
Busseron 
Harrison 
Harrison 
Johnson. 
Decker... 
Steen 



April 9, 
April 9, 
April 9, 
April 9, 
April 9, 
April 9, 
April 9, 
April 9, 
April 9, 
April 9, 
April 9, 



1878. 
1873. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 



83 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



KOSCIUSKO COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIP. 



Isaac Koontz 

Cyrus M. Maxwell... 

Nathan Heaeock 

Samuel Forsythe 

Nathaniel W. Kline 
William E. Groves... 

John Dorsey 

Thomas Hard 

Samuel Coaftinan.... 

Joseph Paxton 

George W. Bright... 



Jackson 

Monroe 

Monroe 

Washington 
Tippecanoe . 
VanBuren... 

Plain 

Clay 

Lake 

Seward 

Lake 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
June 



10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878, 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878. 
20, 1878 



LAGKANGE COUNTY. 



Edwin Owen 

Daniel Wagener 

Norman Babcock 

John W. Knight 

Richard Wade 

Balph Ashley 

Michael Hoff. 

Isaiah Immel 

Jaynes H. Babcock.. 



Van Buren.... 

Eden 

Clear Spring. 
Greenfield .... 

Greeu field 

Springfield.... 

Newbury 

Eden 



April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
June 17, 1878. 
September 5, 1878. 



LAKE COUNTY. 



George M. Roberts 

Harmon Underwood.... 

William I. Babett 

Amos Horner 

J. H. Johnson 

Anthony Seidler 

Wilmington A. Clark... 
William N. Hartpence. 

William Sanders 

E. R. Rube 

J. R.Wood 

Charles A. McGill 

George Williams 

Jesse B. Albur 

T.J.Stearns : 

Josephus H. Irish 

Nicholas Gisen 



North 

Ross 

Ross 

Ross 

St. Johns 

St. Johns 

Center 

Center 

West Creek... 
Cedar Creek.. 
Cedar Creek., 
Eagle Creek.. 

Winfield 

Hobart 

Hobart 

Hanover 



April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 



1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878, 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878, 
1878 
1S7S, 
1878 
1878, 
1878 
1878 
1S78, 
1878, 



84 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



LAPORTE COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



W. W. Cleghorn 

Major D. Solloway 

George A. Steele 

Thomas J. Tappen 

IraC. Nye 

"William W. Lamphere 

Jacob H. White 

John Bowyer 

William Bimpler 

William Hooten 

William S.Hastings 

Ziba Bailey 

Wesley Travis 

Joseph Schoff 

George W. Beynokls 

Boswell N. Bennett 

Alexander Van Pelt 

Joseph B. Higgins 

Vroman Aker 

William Brandis 

August Doneke 

William Pike 

Sylvester Bertram 

George M. Yeakle 

Benjamin E. Wing 

G. W. Conner 

Charles Smith 



Hudson April 

Hudson April 

Galena April 

Galena April 

Springfield April 

Springfield April 

Coalspring April 

Center «vApril 

Center April 

Wills April 

Pleasant April 

Pleasant April 

Pleasant April 

Union April 

Union April 

Noble April 

Scipio April 

Scipio April 

Clinton April 

Clinton April 

Cass April 

Hanna April 

Hanna April 

Dewey April 

Lincoln April 

Johnson April 

Johnson April 



13 


1878. 


1?, 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


1?, 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


1?, 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878 


13 


, 1878 


13 


1878. 


13 


1878 



LAWRENCE COUNTY. 



William D. McHarque 

DallisB. Beavers 

William Bayburn 

William B. Jolly 

George W. Cogswell 

J. M. Parmer 

Edward F. Allen 

Ziba H. Adamson 

Lorenza D. Voss 

George Richards 

Benjamin W. Donica.. 

John S. Armstrong 

Marion Mitchell 

Isaac Bonham 

James McClelland 

Charles Kramer 

James A. Smith 

George White 



Flinn 

Flinn 

Guthrie 

Bono 

Spice Valley 
Spice Valley 
Indian Creek 
Indian Creek 

Perry 

Perry 

Marshall 

Marshall , 

Pleasant Run 
Pleasant Run 
Shawswick.... 
Shawswick.... 

Bono 

Valley 



April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1S78. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
September 4, 1878. 
September 4, 1878. 



85 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 
MADISON COUNTY. 



NAME. 



John P.Diltz 

William Roach 

Andrew F. Kaufman . 

Francis M. Huston 

James M. Garrettson . 
Alexander Menefee .. 

John Oovton 

Allen B. Redding 

Samuel P. Harrison.... 

Samuel Larman 

John T.Adair 

Rudolph Waymire .... 

Isham W. Barton 

Joseph Manis 

John W .Heath 

William Hurley 

Nicholas Morris 



TOWNSHIP. 



Lafayette 

Anderson 

Boone 

Duck Creek .. 

Jackson 

Lafayette 

Lafayette 

Monroe 

Monroe 

Monroe 

Pipe Creek... 
Pipe Creek- 
Richland 

Stony Creek.. 

Union 

Union 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



January 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
April 16, 



29, 1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 

1878. 



MAEION COUNTY. 



William Whitney 

Theodore W. Pease 

Marquis L.Johnson 

George M.Siebert , 

John W. Thompson 

James T.Morgan , 

James S. Walls 

Samuel Strode 

Isaac B. Dewees 

Samuel W. Houston 

John McConnell 

Samuel A. Vandaman 

Joseph F.Trowbridge 

James H. McCurdy 

John C.Reed 

Amos Smith 

Asa N. Farr 

Thomas M. Elliott 

Samuel Ferguson 

Levi A. Hardestv 

Willis W.Wright 

Francis M. Hollingsworth.. 



Center 

Center 

Center 

Center 

Center , 

Wayne 

Decatur 

Decatur...., 

Decatur 

Warren .... 
Warren .... 
Warren .... 

Pike 

Pike 

Pike 

Pike 

Franklin.. 
Lawrence , 

Perry 

Perry 

Center 

Pike 



April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1S78 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 9, 1878 

April 22, 1878 

June 20, 1878. 
July 9, 1878. 



MAESHALL C6UNTY. 



Samuel Moore 

James Walker 

Jonathan Weaver .. 
Sylvester T. Holly- 
Daniel Kehler 

James H. Porter 

George W. Kitch .... 

J. M. Denniston , 

Ferdinand Sparr .... 

Levi Holloway 

Henry S. Grube .... 

John Dills 

James L. Mozier .... 
Daniel J. Roderick. 
Bryan McDaniel 
J. M. Denniston .... 



Plymouth... 

Argos , 

Bremen 

Walnut 

Bourbon .... 
Bourbon .... 
Bourbon ... 

North 

North 

Tippecanoe 

West 

West 

Union 

Polk 

Polk 

North 



April 18, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
April IS, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
April 18, 187S 
April 18, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
April 18, 1878 
June 29, 1878 



86 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



MARTIN COUNTY. 



NAME. 


TOWNSHIP. 


DATE. OF COMMISSION. 






April 10, 1878 






April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1873 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1S7S 
April 10, 1878 






















Otho Sheets 





































MIAMI COUNTY. 



E.M.Bell 

John Olds 

John A. Knight ... 

Albert Deeds 

William H. Leedy 

J. A. Wooley 

Philander Blake... 

Reason Cook 

George Cleckard... 

Hiram Holt 

Robert C. Foor 

A.P.Caldwell 



Erie 

Perry 

Perry 

Union 

Union 

Richland 

Butler 

Butler 

Washington 
Washington 
Pipe Creek., 
Clay 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 187S. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1S78. 
03, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1S78. 
13, 1878. 



MONROE COUNTY. 



Lewis W. Walden 

John Wampkr 

Allen Caskins 

Willis Hubbard 

John Torney 

Isaac Payton 

George W. Brock 

William M. Tate 

Zachariah T. Coffin ... 

John S. Johnson 

Henry Miller 

Jonathan May 

Philip Bond 

Richard L. Stephenson 

Isaac C. Chandler 

G.Johnson Wright 



Bean Blossom 
Bean Blossom 
Washington . 
Washington .. 

Marion 

Marion 

Benton 

Bloomia '"in . 
Bloomington . 

Richland 

Perry 

Perry 

Sail l 'reck 

Salt Creek 

Polk 

Indian Creek. 




87 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



MONTGOMEBY COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



E. S. Osburn 

Amos Ebrite 

B. T. Hays 

George Grim 

J. M. Truax 

M. A. Sarvis 

G. Jarues 

Byron E. Busseil 

William E. Fry 

Joseph Golbreath 

William Eoyer 

Alexander Campbell.. 

Lucien D. Coyuer , 

John Bone 

William Armstrong .. 

J.M. Lemmon 

Charles Eowe 

G. W. Williamson 

George G. Meyers 

Jasper N. Osburn 

Jesse W. Cumberland 
William Armstrong.. 
William E. Fry 



Coal Creek.. 
Coal Creek.. 

Wayne 

Eipley 

Eipley 

Scott 

Scott 

Union 

Union 

Madison 

Madison 

Madison 

Sugar Creek 
Sugar Creek 

Franklin 

Walnut 

Walnut 

Walnut 

Clark 

Clark 

Union 

Franklin 

Union 



1S78. 
1878 
1878 
1878. 
1878 
1878 
1878 
187S 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878. 
1878 
1878 
1878, 
1878, 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 



April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

April 12, 

May 15, 1878 

June 10, 1878. 

September 17, 1878. 



MOKGAN COUNTY. 



William Grant 

J. W. Doty 

William C. Ehea 

Joseph A. Goss 

T. J.Ashley 

Samuel Mears 

William Fowler 

William N. Hodges , 

George P. Wray 

John V. King. I 

William L. Eude 

Charles W. Underwood 

Eeuben S. Aldrich 

E. K.Thomas 

Milton Clark 

William H. Bay 

Benjamin F. Butler 

George W. Miller 



Brown ... 

Gregg 

Adams... 

Eay 

Bay 

Jefferson 
Jefferson 

Baker 

Ashland 
Jackson.. 
Jackson .. 

Green 

Harrison 
Madison . 

Clay 

Brown ... 
Brown ... 
Harrison 



April 13 
April 13 
April 13 
April 1 
April 13 
April 13 
April 13 
April 13 
April IE 
April 13 
April 13 
April 13 
April 13 
April 13 
April 13 
April 13 
April 1 



, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1S7S. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1S78. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 
, 1878. 



May 9, 1878. 



NEWTON COUNTY. 



Hugh Eoberts 

Joseph Holloway... 

Andrew Hess 

John Pendergrass. 

A. L. Crow 

Samuel Hawley.... 
Hamlet D. Thayer. 
William Cumming 

Mich ;el Coffett 

C. D. Holmes 

John D. Sink 

Charts Forbes 

David S. Williams. 
Henrv C. Collins.... 

John M. Hufty 

^WiUiam Miller 



Grant 

Beaver 

Iroquois 

Washington 
Washington 

Lake 

Jefferson 

Jefferson 

Jefferson 

MeCIellan... 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Colfax 

Colfax 

Jackson 

Jackson 



April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
Aoril 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
Aoril 11 



1878. 
1S78. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
187S. 
1878. 
1878. 
1S78. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1S78. 
1878. 



88 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



NOBLE COUNTY. 



NAMES. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



DavidS. Longfellow 

John D. Nast 

John C.Johnson 

Andrew Jackson 

Hiram Cooper 

Charles K.Green , 

Jesse B. Smith 

Hiram Peterson 

Frank W. Weineh 

Virgil A. Stewart 

Christopher Kepine 

Leek M. Clemers 

John Longyear 

Simpson T. Emerick 

Stephen Wiidman 

Lake Ihrie 

Ephraim Meyers 

James H. Kneiss 

James A. Hamlin 

Solomon C. Hardenbroek 



Washington.. 

Sparta 

Sparta 

Perry 

Perry 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

York 

Noble 

Noble 

Jefferson 

Green 

Wayne 

Wayne 

Wayne 

Allen 

Allen 

Swan 

Albion 

Albion 



April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1873 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 
April 12, 1878 



OHIO COUNTY. 



Richard M.Jones 

John Latham 

James W. Turner 

William W. Donney 



Randolph 
Randolph 
Pike 



April 10, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 



ORANGE COUNTY. 



Arthur J. Simpson. 
William S. Mahan.. 
William H. Walker. 

James J. Baker 

Jacob M; Stultz 

Jacob C. Woner 

John E.Payne 

Volney Wolfington. 
Charles 0.:Chilton.. 

Cyrus Lomax 

John Wolfington.... 

David Wade 

William Busick 

Jesse B. Moore 

Allen Wolf 

William H. Martin 



Paoli 

Paoli 

North East 

North East 

Orleans 

Orangeville 

North West 

French Lick 

French Lick 

Greenfield 

Jackson 

Jackson 

South East 

South East 

Stumper's Creek- 
Stumper's Creek.. 



April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 



1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 



89 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



OWEN COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



James K.Smith 

Nathaniel T. Livingston. 

Marcus L. Orrall 

William Brown 

William Phillips 

David C. Benjamin 

Daniel Startz 

Christopher Neese 

JohnN. Blair 

Jathro C. Culmer 

John Keller 

John F. Evans 

Frankton B. Drake 

John Bogers 

James L. Dunnogan 

Curtis G. H. Goss 

William E. Stines 

Silas E. Deem 

Squire P. Wright 

Paschal S. Buchanan 

Greenville Owens 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
AprD 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 



PAEKE COUNTY. 



John Chesser 

Gilbert Carress 

Benjamin F. Engle. 

Isaac A. Harvey 

John H. Woody 

Minor T. Davis 

John W. Kemp 

Jos. A. MeAdams.... 
Josephus W. Lake- 
John C. Gilkeson.... 

George C.Beit 

Abraham Brunei - .... 
James N. Jerome.... 

William Wiley 

Jacob M. Lain 

Moses Burks 

William A. Detrick. 

Isaac N. Hunt 

Elkaaah S. Vickry .. 
Zacheus S. Strobe.. 
Samuel Lenebarger. 
■Stephen D. Denehie 



Adams 

Adams 

Washington. 
Sugar Creek 

Liberty 

Beserve 

Beserve 

Wabash 

Florida 

Baccoon 

Baccoon 

Jackson 

Union 

Union 

Green 

Green 

Howard 

Peru 

Peru 

Florida 

Beserve 

Bosedale 



April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878. 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
April 10, 1878 
June 14, 1878. 



PERKY COUNTY. 



Frederick Wilsman 
George W. Dodson.. 
Alfred Critchfield .. 
Harding Chewning. 

Martin S. Sweat 

John Cody 

Jacob Dhonan 

Q.K. Gross 

Michael Mogan 



Anderson 
Anderson 

Clark 

Clark 

Leopold... 
Leopold... 

Tobin 

Tobin 

Union .... 



April 20, 1878 
April 20, 1878 
April 20, 1878 
April 20, 1878 
April 20, 1878 
April 20, 1878 
April 20, 1878 
April 20, 1878 
April 20, 1878 



HO 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



PIKE COUNTY. 



NAME. 


TOWNSHIP. 


DATE OF COMMI 


Philip Selby 




April 13, 187S. 






April 13, 1878. 


William A. Oliphant 


Clay 


April 13, 1878. 


Albert Robling 


Madison 






Madison 


April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 




Patoka 




April 13, 1878. 






April 13, 1878. 






April 13, 1878. 


Perry W. Falls .... 




April 13, 1878. 






April 13, 1878. 






April 13, 1878. 






April 13, 1878. 







POKTEK COUNTY. 



Temple Windle 

Harvey Kimball 

David "B. Peck 

Jacob Peoples 

James H. True 

John Broombough.. 

J.B.Decron , 

John A. Frear 

William Bitter 

Chester Hurllnu 

J. W. Paramore 

William Gibbs 

Otis Dye 

William Brnmmett 

Oliver H. Smith 

George Williams .... 
Gilbert Blim 



Center 

Center 

Union 

Washington 

Pleasant 

Pleasant .... 

Morgan 

Morgan 

Porter 

Porter 

Boone 

Boone 

Boone 

Pine 

Pine 

Essex 

Essex 



April 13. 
April 13, 
April 13. 
April 13, 
Aprii 13, 
April 13, 
April IS, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 
April 13, 



1 7 . 
1S78. 
1878. 
1878. 

1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 



POSEY COUNTY. 



Sydney Allen 

Joshua Cox 

Michael M< Shai e ... 
Charles Alexander ... 

John L. Benner 

William i>. Hawkins 

Theodore Mill* r 

Florian Gobel 

John Merriman 



Black April 9, 1878. 

I April 9, 1878. 

Black April:', I 78. 

Lynn | April '.), 1>78. 

April 9, 1878. 

Marrs | April 9, 1878. 

Marrs April 9, 187S. 

Robinson I Aprii 9, 1878. 

Center April 'J, 1878. 



91 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



PULASKI COUNTY. 



NAME. 


TOWNSHIP. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 






April 18, 187S. 
April 18, 187S. 






Wilson Withani 




April 18, 1878. 






April 18, 1878. 






April IS, 1878. 






April 18, 1878. 




White Post 


April 18, 1878. 




April IS, 1878. 






April 18, 1878. 






April IS, 1878. 


David H. Thornton 




April 18, 187*. 






April 18, 187S. 







PUTNAM COUNTY. 



James Moreland 

Jarues L. Dickerson 

Philip Kindail 

Mason Vermillion 

Milton E. Thomas 

Samuel Colliver 

David B. Priest 

Samuel Hiliis 

James Turner 

Adam L. Ellis 

Jerome Coleman 

Thomas Wyatt 

Donomi>n Woods 

John W. Fellows 

Henry F. Reel 

John Kesterson 

William H. O'Neal 

Michael M. Hurst 

Peter H. McChire 

Charles E.Walls 

Elakirn Long 

Henry C.Blue 

George H. Freeman ... 
Benjamin C.Coleman.. 

Jesse Kendall 

Robert Williamson 



Jackson 

Franklin 

Russell 

Clinton 

Clinton 

Monroe 

Monroe 

Monroe 

Floyd 

Floyd 

Marion 

Madison 

Madison 

Washington.. 
Washington.. 

Warren 

Warren 

Jefferson 

Cloverdale ... 
Cloverdale ... 
Cloverdale ... 
Mill Creek ... 
Greencastle .. 
G-reencastle .. 
Jackson 



April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
Anril 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1S7S. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1S78. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9. 187S. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 187S. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1S78. 
April 9, 1878. 
July S, 1878. 
September 13, 



EANDOLPH COUNTY. 



Charles L.Lewis 

Thomas N. Rash , 

George M.Bascom 

John Jessop 

Martin L. Canada 

William R. Pearson .. 
William H. Harrison 
Oliver I.Culbertson .. 

Royal H. Davis 

Robert B. Wilkerson.. 

Uriah Ball 

Miles Scott 

Thomas J Neelan 

Lindley Thornburg .. 

John A.Jones 

Samuel M. Betts 

Wright M. Turner 

Joseph T. Thomas 

Samuel M. Betts 



White River 
Washington.. 
Washington.. 
Stony Creek.. 
Nettle Creek 
West River .. 

Green 

Ward 

Jackson 

Jackson 

Wayne 

Wayne 

Monroe 

Monroe 

Monroe 

Franklin 

Green's Fork 
West River- 
Franklin 



April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 11, 
April 13, 
June 15, 



1S7S. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
187S: 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
18,8. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
187S. 
1878. 
1S7S. 
1S7S. 



92 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



KIPLEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 



Stephen Chandler 

Ira B.Pickett 

William W.McCabe.... 

John P. Jarvis 

Martin V. Sheets 

Nicholas Mooreback.... 

Perry Myers 

Charles Johnson 

John H. Severinghouse 

George A. Kramer 

Martin Mollenkoup .... 

Caleb D.Sumner 

Frederick Behlmer 

John D. Bruning 

John W. Bertsman 

James R. Bennett 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



Johnson 

Johnson 

Washington 

Brown 

Otto Creek.. 

Jackson 

Jackson 

Laughery ... 
Laughery ... 

Adams 

Adams 

Franklin 

Franklin.... 
Delaware.... 
Delaware.... 
Center 



April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
Aprill3, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878, 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 



BUSH COUNTY. 



MjLlton Hill 

Benjamin Nixon 

Henry Holt 

Thomas A. Addison . 

Thomas A. Boss 

Jasper N. Barlow 

John Hume 

John Zimmerlee 

Charles B.Bodine ... 

George W. Guire 

James Gray , 

George W. Gilson 

Wilson T.Jackson.... 

D.P.Saul 

C.H.Stevens 

William J. Winchell 
Asbury Cook 



Bipley 

Ripley 

Bipley 

Posey 

Orange 

Orange 

Anderson .... 
Anderson .... 
Rushville .... 
Bushville .... 

Jackson 

Center 

Washington 
Washington 

Union , 

Noble 

Richland 



April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 
April 11 



1878 
1878, 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1873 
1878, 
1878, 
1878 



SCOTT COUNTY. 



Asbury Thompson 
Lewis H. Baldwin , 
Colin F. Lanham ., 

William Boyle 

Henry C. Richey ... 



Johnson .. 
Jennings.. 
Lexington 
Lexington 
Finley 



April 25, 1878 
April 25, 1878 
April 25, 1878 
April 25, 1878 
April 25, 1878 



93 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



SHELBY COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



John M. Payne 

"William M. Deiwert 

Martin Higgins 

Joseph Hendrickson 

Thomas J. Jones 

Michael Poez 

Edward Carslile 

J.H.Norton 

Philip MiUer 

Wilson T. MeQueasey ... 

W.L.Smith 

Michael Rice 

Sampson Meeks 

Ephraim W.Hester 

A.K.Spencer 

John F. Roken 

John Chambers 

Andrew J.Smith 

Thomas Higganbotham.. 

George S.Jones 

Andrew Higgins 

William Cochran 

Leander Fox 



Jackson 

Washington.. 
Washington.. 

Noble 

Noble 

Addison 

Addison 

Hendricks ... 
Sugar Creek .. 
Sugar Creek.. 
Brandywine.. 

Marion 

Marion 

Union 

Hanover ." 

Van Buren... 
Van Buren... 

Moral 

Moral 



Addison ... 
Hendricks , 
Marion 



April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
June 14, 1878. 
September 17, 1878. 
September 17, 1878. 
September 17, 1878. 



SPENCEE COUNTY. 



Simon Miller 

Martin Stuteville 

James Sumner , 

C.S. Finch 

F. M. Cooper 

Mathias Eiden 

Stephen Risse 

Thomas J. Bradley .. 

George Freikes 

Isaac N. Shrode 

Jefferson Atwood 

W.H.Taylor 

John Furgeson 

Simmons Gwaltney 



Luce' 

Ohio 

Ohio 

Hammond , 
Hammond . 

Huff 

Huff 

Carter 

Jackson..'... 

Gross , 

Gross 

Clay 

Clay 



April 17, 1878 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878. 
April 17, 1878 
April 17, 1878, 
April 17, 1878 
April 17, 1878 
April 17, 1878, 
April 17, 1878 
April 17, 1878 
June 18, 1878. 



STAEKE COUNTY. 



Joshua W. Williams. 

Samuel Parker 

Christian Enright .... 

E.C.Chew 

William C.Brown 

John M. Wolfrom .... 
Edward W. Lorring . 
William F. Shelling . 

John E. Short 

Josephus R. Peelle.... 

J. D. Barmvin 

John L. Eatinger 

Lon E. Barneath 

Bradford Glazebrook 

George W.Green 

J. B. Done 

Benjamin S.Bell 



North Bend, 
North Bend, 
Washington 
Washington 

Oregon 

Oregon 

Oregon 

California.... 

Center 

Center , 

Center , 

Wayne 

Wayne 

Railroad .... 
Railroad .... 

Davis 

Davis 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
33, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 187S. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 
13, 1878. 



94 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



ST. JOSEPH COUNTY. 



NAME. 


TOWNSHIP. 


DATE OF COMMISSION. 






April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 














April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1S78. 














April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 










S. J. Nicoles 






Olive 


April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 






John P. Hitter 




April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878 . 











STEUBEN COUNTY. 



Robert N.Purdy 

Joel G. Shutts 

Valentine W. Rathburn 

John N. Ousterhout 

Edson J. Fitch 

Harlow B. Holdridge .... 

Amasa S. Ellethorpe 

James Ketchum 



Millgrove .. 
Jamestown 
Clear Lake 

Jackson 

Pleasant ... 

Seott 

Salem 

Steuben 



April 10, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
April 10, 1S78. 
April 10, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 
April 10, 1878. 



SULLIVAN COUNTY. 



James M.Clark 

Joel Hendricks 

Michael Branson 

Joseph M.Russell 

I. W. Burton 

Perry H. Blue 

Samuel Wall 

John Hawtree 

Samuel Smith 

James A.Payne 

Thomas M. Donthiel.... 

John S.Howard 

William N.Hollenbeck 



Jackson.... 

Curry 

Curry 

Fairbanks 
Turman.... 
Hamilton 
Hamilton 

Cass 

Cass 

Jefferson.. 
Jefferson.. 
Haddon.... 
Gill 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 
16, 1878. 



SWITZERLAND COUNTY. 



IraBanta 

George C. Patton .. 
Richard B. Smock 

William Long 

Philander S. Sage.. 
Hurry Littl elk-Id.. 

John C. S.Neal 

Harvey Lawrance 

James P. Keitz 

George Deible 

James Stewart 



Craig 

Jefferson 
Jefferson 
Cotton ... 
Cotton ... 
Cotton... 
Pleasant. 
Pleasant 

York 

Posey 

Posey 



April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878, 
April 15, 1S78 
April 15, 1878, 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 
April 15, 1878 



95 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



TIPPECANOE COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



"William Applebaugh, 
Patrick H. Sheehan . 

Charles O. Cleaver 

Lewis Dryer 

Edward E. Haydeu.... 

Peter Craig 

John P. Oglebay 

David Rinehart , 

Joseph Whistler 

George W.Odell 

Charles W. Weaver ... 

William Stover 

Irwin Fox 

Baldwin Mintonye ... 

Frank Weaver 

James Brands 

Moses Wood 

A.W.Fox 



Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Washington. 

Sheffield 

Sheffield 

Wea 

Laurmie 

Launnie 

Handolph... 

Jackson 

Wayne 

Wayne 

Union 

Union 

Wabash 

Shelby 

Tippecanoe.. 
Union 



April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1873. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1378. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
April 13, 1878. 
August 5, 1878. 



TIPTON COUNTY. 



James Cornutt 

James W.Horbett 

Philip H. Ballard 

Andrew J. McClanahan.. 

James P.Thomas...; 

Richard M. Sanders 

Jeft'erson Ruse 

John H. Bundav 

William Shuck" 

James M. Curnett 

Charles L.Newton 

V.C.Wisner 

Peter Dewitt 

James J. Gore 

Welford Sparlin 

Absalom Gilford 

Jacob Barrow 

George H. Chase 



Cicero.. 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 187S. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 
18, 1878. 



UNION COUNTY. 



David S. Pierson .... 
Maline M.Johnson . 

M.R.Foster 

J.M.Stanton 

Alfred Burke 

John Clarke 

Powel Slade 

Smith Railsback .... 
Joseph Showalter... 



April 9, 1878 
April 9, 1878 
April 9, 1878 
April 9, 1878 
April 9, 1878 
April 9, 1878 
April 9, 1878 
April 9, 1878 
April 9, 1878 



96 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



VANDERBURGH COUNTY, 



NAME. 




DATE OF COMMISSION. 



Thaddeus McLemran 
Samuel P. Havlin .... 
Richard Litchfield ... 
William Niehouse.... 

Charles Gantner 

Joseph Hartlein 

Henry Meinert 

Edward Schmodel 

James L.King 

E.J.Gerard 



Pigeon .. 
Knight., 

Seott 

('enter .. 
German 
German. 
Perry.... 
Perry.... 
Union .. 
Union .. 



April 9, 1S78. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
August 31, 1878. 



VERMILLION COUNTY. 



Francis M. Bryant. 

John Lowry 

Frank S.Smith 

John W. Kartman . 
George W. Sexton . 
George Andrews.... 
John Q. Washburn 



Highland .. 

Eugene 

Eugene 

Vermillion 

Helt 

Helt 

Clinton 



April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878 
April 13, 1878. 



VIGO COUNTY. 



Grafton F. Cbokerly 

L. B. Denehie 

Marcus Schaewehl.... 

Jacob Sternwehl 

Joseph Overpeck 

Abraham Sparks 

John F.Nelson 

Ferdinand Volkers.. 

Joseph C. Stout 

Henry C. Copeland ... 
George F. Hampton 

James B. Walker 

M.T. Goodman 

George W. Otey , 

Henry C. Fortune..., 

George R. Shultz 

Marcus Schomehe.... 



Harrison 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Otter Creek ... 
Otter Creek ... 

Prairieton 

Prairieton 

Pierson 

Pierson 

Linton 

Linton 

Sugar Creek... 
Honey Creek. 
Prairie Creek. 
Riley 



April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 
April 10, 



1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878. 
1878, 
1S78 
1878. 
1878, 
187S, 
1878, 
1878 
1S78 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 



WABASH COUNTY. 



Lewis J.Long 

Benjamin F. Clemens, 
Andrew J. Robinson.. 

William H.Parke 

George W. Small 

Sidney McGuire 

Lewis Keagle 

B. F. Clemmons 



Chester . 
Chester . 

Lngro 

Lagro 

Noble 

Noble.... 
Pleasant 
Chester . 



April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
April 12, 1878. 
July 25, 1878. 



97 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



WARREN COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



Leorand Eickarts 

Joel C. Cox 

John Swadley 

Lewis K. Kelvie 

George Cameron 

Montgomery Meyers 
Joshua Satterthwart. 

Joel Briggs 

William Bartlett 

Elisha Rodgers 

Absafom Miller 

John R. Copeland .... 



Kent 

Warren 

Warren 

Pike , 

Washington 

Prairie 

Adams 

Jordon 

Pine 

Mound 

Mound 

Liberty 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



15, 1878 
15, 1878, 
15, 1878, 
15, 1878 
15, 1878, 
15, 1878, 
15, 1878, 
15, 1878 
15, 1878 
15, 1878, 
15, 1878 
15, 1878, 



WARRICK COUNTY. 



Solomon Eble 

James B. Carter 

Philip H. Miller 

I. E. McSwane 

Julius Hummel 

J.S.Davis 

G.B.Cook 

Adrian Young 

Philip Segal 

Jones N. Bryan 

Elijah Skil ton 

Thompson J. Simpson 



Anderson 

Boone 

Campbell 

Greer 

Greer , 

Hart 

Lnne 

Ohio 

Ohio 

Pigeon ..., 
Skilton.... 
Skelton.... 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 1878, 
10, 1878, 
10, 1878 
10, 1878 
10, 4878 
10, 1878, 
10, 1878 
10, 1878, 
10, 1878, 



WASHINGTON COUNTY. 



William Gregory 

Joseph D. Hague 

Christian Prow 

Nathaniel P. Mather.. 
Jeremiah O. Caress.... 

Logan D. Voyles 

John W. Poison 

James M. Canble 

James W. Prow 

Eli Elrod 

Lemin Baker 

Eli Strain 

Thomas Rogain 

George Nongle 

Andrew B.Miller 

Edward T. VaDcleave, 

M.E. Martial 

E.H.Morris 



Monroe 

Jefferson ...., 

Brown 

Brown , 

Brown 

Vernon 

Vernon 

Washington 
Washington 

Polk 

Polk 

Pierce 

Howard 

Howard 

Madison 

Madison 

Jackson 

Jackson 



April 18 


1878. 


April 18 


1878. 


April 18 


1878. 


April 18 


1878. 


April 18 


1878. 


April 18 


1878 


April 18 


1878 


April 18 


1878. 


April 18 


1878. 


April 18 


1878 


April 18 


1878. 


April 18 


1878 


April 18 


1878 


April 18 


1878. 


April 18 


1878. 


April 18 


1878 


April 18 


1878 


April 18 


1878 





7 — Sec. State. 



98 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



WAYNE COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



Henry J. McCashland 
Gilbert N. Woodyard.. 

David Geutry 

Thomas Wilson 

James T. Nicholson 

A. K. Dougherty 

Jacob Markle 

B. W. Addleman 

Thomas S. Tagan 

Milton M. Wooley 

John Berry 

David L. Bowman 

Addison H. Harris 

Elijah Coate 

John M. Williams 

Isaac N. Glines 

Luke D. Rourk 

John S. Lyle 

Addison Arnett 



Abington 

Abington 

Center 

Center 

Clay 

Clay 

Dalton 

Franklin 

Green 

Green 

Harrison 

Jackson 

New Garden 
New Garden 

Perry 

Perry 

Washington.. 

Wayne 

Webster 



April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878, 
April 11, 1S78. 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 
April 11, 1878 



WELLS COUNTY. 



JohnRhoby , 

Joseph E. Shuman. 
William Newhart . 

John Cass 

George Kimble 

Silvanus Shepherd 
Manuel Chalfant.... 

Henry Read 

George W. Kimble. 



Jackson 

Liberty 

Union 

Union 

Nottingham 

Harrison 

Lancaster .... 

Jefferson 

Nottingham 



April 22, 1878. 
April 22, 1878. 
April 22, 1878. 
April 22, 1878. 
April 22, 1878. 
April 22, 1878. 
April 22, 1878. 
April 22, 1878. 
June 19, 1878. 



WHITE COUNTY. 



Ebenezer G. Walcott 
Louis A. Goodrich... 

Aaron Wood 

Philip F.Ward 

W.D.Wilson 

William Wallace 

John C. Nicholson... 

John W. Forney 

E. L. Wickersham... 

James C. Herron 

E. A. Hann 

P. L. Bush 

James Wallace 

Edgar P. Henry 

Henry Sluyter 

Simon Shester 

William H. Straton.. 
Lewis A. Goodrich.. 



Princeton 

Princeton 

Honey Creek 
Honey Creek 

Big Creek 

Big Creek 

West Point... 
West. Point... 

Cass 

Union 

Round Grove 
Round Grove 

Union 

Jackson 

Liberty 

Liberty 

Brookston 

Princeton 



April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
April 9, 1878. 
July 15, 1878. 



99 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE— Continued. 



WHITLEY COUNTY. 



NAME. 



TOWNSHIP. 



DATE OF COMMISSION. 



William F. Nagney 

James A. Campbell 

Winfield S. Gandy f. 

Lemuel Derault .'. 

Alexander Moore 

James Blane 

John Adair 

Clarence E. Doane 

Warren Martin 



Columbia 

Columbia .... 

Smith 

Smith 

Union , 

Troy 

Etna 

Etna 

Washington 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878 
17, 1878 
17, 1878. 
17, 1878 
17, 1878. 



100 



RAILROAD CORPORATIONS, 

Articles of Association or Corporation or Reports Filed During 
the Year ending October 31, 1878. 



NAME OF COMPANY. 



When Filed. 



Cincinnati & Jeffersonville Ohio River Railroad 

Chicago, Indianapolis & Southern Railroad 

Chicago, Worthingtou & Washington Railroad 

Chicago & Indiana Southern Railroad 

Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati & Indianapolis Railroad, tenth annual report. 

Chicago, Rensselaer &. Brazil Railroad 

Delphi, Blutfton & Frankfort Railroad 

Eel River Railroad 

Evausville, Washington, Brazil 8c Chicago Railroad '. 

Evansville, Washington & Worthington Railroad 

Fort Wayne, Markle & Southwestern Railroad 

Indiana Extension Railway 

Indiana Southern Railroad 

Indianapolis & Madison Railroad, (certificate of election of ten directors) 

Indianapolis Street Railway 

Kokonio & Xenia Railroad 

Petersburgh & Worthington Railroad 

Toledo, Union & Cincinnati Railroad 

Terre Haute & Southeastern Railroad 

Toledo, Delphos & Indianapolis Railroad 

White Water Railroad 

Indiana Block Coal Railroad 



April 20,1878. 
April 26,1878. 
April 29,1878. 
May 3,1878. 
May 12,1878. 
October 23, 1878. 
July 19,1878. 
December 14, 1877. 
April 8,1878. 
April 29,1878. 
February 28,1878. 
March 2, 1878. 
April 18, 1878. 
May 24,1878. 
September 30, 1878. 
June 25,1878. 
Jauuary 23,1878. 
November 21, 1877. 
June 6, 1878. 
August 31,1878. 
May 27,1878. 
April 27, 1878. 



101 



ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION 

Of Manufacturing, Mining, Banking and Building Associations, 
filed during the year ending October 31, 1878. 



WHEN FILED. 



NAME. 



March 22, 1878 

April 6, 1878 

April 17, 1878 

March 1, 1878 1 

February 6, 1878 1 

March 26, 1878 

January 29, 1878 

September 27, 1878... 
November 23, 1877... 
December 19, 1877... 

January 8, 1878 

February 28, 1878.... 

July 25, 1878 

August 26, 1878 

March 12, 1878 

July 8, 1878 

July 26, 1878 

November 15, 1877... 

February 25, 1878.... 

March 1, 1878 

May 10, 1878 

June 20, 1878 

July 25, 1878 

December 12, 1877... 
December 24, 1877... 

March 28, 1878 

April 6,1878 

July 24, 1878 



July 5, 1878 

January 26, 1878... 
February 23, 1878. 



March 1, 1878 

October 4, 1878 

January 14, 1878 

January 21, 1878 

October 26, 1878 

November 24, 1877.. 

June 25, 1878 

May 29, 1878 1 

March 21, 1878 1 



May 27, 1878 

August 7, 1878... 
August 27, 1878.. 
October 9, 1878... 



March 8, 1878 

June 3, 1878 

September 2, 1878 ... 
November 24, 1877... 

June 6, 1878 

Januarv 26, 1878 

April 17, 1878 

June 18, 1878 

October 1, 1878 

October 15, 1878 

February 20, 1878.... 

March 1, 1878 

July 29, 1878 

August 2, 1878 

September 24, 1878... 

May 28, 1878 

October 4, 1878 1 

July 16, 1878 1 



Arizona Gold and Silver Mining Company 

Arizona Gold and Silver Mining Company 

Atlas Engine Works 

Bedford Building, Savings and Loan Association 

Building Association 

Brazil and Chicago Coal Company 

Bedford Lumber and Furniture Company 

Brazil Block Coal Company 

Commercial Bank .' , 

Citizens' flas Company 

Citizens' Bank 

Coopers' Cooperative Company 

Clinton Building and Savings Association 

Connersville Gas Company 

Dayton Carriage Company 

Dairy and Farm Machine Company 

Delphi Building, Loan and Savings Association 

Eastern Indiana Agricultural, Mechanical and Trotting 
Park Association 

Evansville Machine and Scythe Stone Company 

Eagle Knitting Company 

Eureka Wall Protection Company 

Elkhart Starch Company 

Eureka Gold and Silver Mining Company 

Fountain County Coal and Mining Company , 

Farmers' Elevator Company 

Flint Building Association 

Farmers' and Merchants' Bank 

Farmers' and Merchants' Bank, (increase of capital 
stock) 

Goshen Cornet Band ; , 

Haynes, Spencer & Company 

Hecla Consolidated Mining Company, (number of di- 
rectors reduced) 

Hope Fire Insurance Company 

Hoosier Drill Company 

Indianapolis Furniture Company 

Indianapolis Iron Works 

Indiana State Missionary Board 

Jeffersonville Water Works Company 

Jeffersonville German Savings and Loan Association 

Kokomo Gas Light Company 

Indianapolis Manufacturing and Carpenters' Union, (re- 
duction of capital stock) 

Madison Marine and Railway Ship Yard Company 

Mariou Coal Gas Company 

Mutual Savings and Loan Association 

Monarch Gold and Silver Mining Company, (reduction 
of capital stock) , 

National Pump Company 

National Pump Company, (establishing branch offices)... 

North Indianapolis Cradle Works 

Ohio Valley Cement Company 

O'Brien Electric Priming Company 

Red Cloud Lodge, No. 640, K. of H 

Regent Mining Company 

Richmond Cutlery Company 

Randolph County Bank 

Register Printing Company 

Smith Refrigerator Company 

Star Coal Minery 

South Bend Chilled Plow Company 

Spiker & Harrison Manufacturing Company 

Saulsbury & Vinton Paper Company 

Temperance Hail Association 

Telembi Mining Company 

Terre Haute Elevator Company 



WHERE LOCATED. 



Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Bedford. 

Cannelton. 

Brazil. 

Bedford. 

Brazil. 

Union City. 

Jeffersonville. 

Hagerstown. 

Lafayette. 

Frankfort. 

Connersville. 

Lafayette. 

Indianapolis. 

Delphi. 

Connersville. 

Evansville. 

Elkhart. 

Michigan City. 

Elkhart. 

Richmond. 

Covington. 

Martinsville. 

Flint. 

Winchester. 

Winchester. 

Goshen. 

Richmond. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Richmond. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Jeffersonville. 

Jeffersonville. 

Kokomo. 

Indianapolis. 
Madison. 
Marion. 
Jeffersonville. 

Indianapolis. 

Indiauapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Jeffersonville. 

South Bend. 

Evansville. 

Indianapolis. 

Richmond. 

Winchester. 

South Bend. 

Michigan City. 

Terre Haute. 

South Bend. 

Logansport. 

Indianapolis. 

Cannelton. 

Indianapolis. 

Terre Haute. 



102 



ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION— Continued. 



WHEN FILED. 


NAME. 


WHERE LOCATED. 


May 6, 1878 






August 10, 1878 

October 30, 1878 ... 








Indianapolis. 


February 26, 1878.... 
March 22 1878. 






Indianapolis. 


May 1, 1878 


Western Furniture Company, (reduction of capital 






July 25,1878 













INDIANA OFFICIAL REGISTER. 



TERRITORIAL GOVERNORS. 

Arthur St. Clair, Governor Northwest Territory. 
William H. Harrison, from 1 800 -to 1812. 
Thomas Posey, from 1812 to 1816. 



GOVERNORS OF THE STATE. 

Jonathan Jennings, from 1816 to 1819. 

Jonathan Jennings, (second term), from 1819 to 1822. 

William Hendricks, from 1822 to 1825. 

James B. Ray, (acting), February, 1825. 

James B. Ray, from 1825 to 1828. 

James B. Ray, (second term), from 1828 to 1831. 

Noah Noble, from 1831 to 1834. 

Noah Noble, (second term), from 1834 to 1837. 

David Wallace, from 1837 to 1840. 

Samuel Bigger, from 1840 to 1843. 

James Whitcomb, from 1843 to 1846. 

James Whitcomb, from 1846 to 1848. 

Paris C. Dunning, (acting), from 1848 to 1849. 

Joseph A. Wright, from 1849 to 1852. 

Joseph A. Wright, from 1852 to 1857. 

Ashbel P. Willard, from 1857 to 1860. 

Abram A. Hammond, from 1860 to 1861. 



104 
GOVERNORS OF THE STATE— Continued. 

Henry S. Lane, (a few days), 1860. 

Oliver P. Morton, (acting), from 1860 to 1865. 

Oliver P. Morton, from 1865 to 1867. 

Conrad Baker, (acting), from 1867 to 1869. 

Conrad Baker, from 1869 to 1873. 

Thomas A. Hendricks, from 1873 to 1877. 

James D. Williams, from 1877 to . 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNORS. 

Christopher Harrison, from 1816 to*1819. 

Ratliffe Boone, from 1819 to 1825. 

John H. Thompson, from 1825 to 1828. 

Milton Stapp, from 1828 to 1831. 

David Wallace, from 1831 to 1837. 

David Hillis, from 1837 to 1840. 

Samuel Hall, from 1840 to 1843. 

Jesse D. Bright, from 1843 to 1845. 

Godlove S. Orth, (acting), 1845. 

James G. Reed, (acting), 1846. 

Paris C. Dunning, from 1846 to 1848. 

James G. Reed, (acting), 1849. 

James H. Lane, from 1849 to 1852. 

Ashbel P. Willard, from 1852 to 1857. 

Abram A. Hammond, from 1857 to 1859. 

John R. Cravens, (acting), from 1859 to 1863. 

Paris C. Dunning, (acting), from 1863 to 1865. 

Conrad Baker, from 1865 to 1867. 

Will. Cumback, (acting), from 1867 to 1869. 

Will. Cumback, from. 1869 to 1873. 

Leonidas Sexton, from 1873 to 1877. 

Isaac P. Gray, from 1877 to . 



105' 

SECRETARIES OF STATE. 

John Gibson, Territorial, from 1800 to 1816. 
Robert A. New, from 1816 to 1825. 
William W. Wick, from 1825 to 1829. 
James Morrison, from 1829 to 1833. 
William Sheets, from 1833 to 1837. 
William J. Brown, from 1837 to 1841. 
William Sheets, from 1841 to 1845. 
John H. Thompson, from 1845 to 1849. 
Charles H. Test, from 1849 to 1853. 
Nehemiah Hayden, from 1853 to 1855. 
Erasmus B. Collins, from -1855 to 1857. 
Daniel McClure, from 1857 to 1859. 
Cyrus L. Dunham, from 1859 to 1861. 
William A. Peelle, from 1861 to 1863. 
James S. Athon, from 1863 to 1865. 
Nelson Truster, from 1865 to 1869. 
Max. F. A. Hoffman, from 1869 to 1871. 
Norman Eddy, from 1871 to 1872. 
John H. Farquhar, from 1872 to 1873. 
William W. Curry, from 1873 to 1875. 
John E. Neff, from 1875 to 1879. 
John G. Shanklin, from 1879 to . 



AUDITORS OF STATE. 

William H. Lilley, from 1816 to 1829. 
Morris Morris, from 1829 to 1844. 
Horatio J. Harris, from 1844 to 1847. 
Douglass Maguire, from 1847 to 1850. 
Erastus W. H. Ellis, from 1850 to 1853. 
John P. Dunn, from 1853 to 1855. 
Hiram E. Talbott, from 1855 to 1857. 
John W. Dodd, from 1857 to 1861. 



'106 

AUDITORS OF STATE— Continued. 

Albert Lange, from 1861 to 1863. 
Joseph Ristine, from 1863 to 1865. 
Thomas B. McCarty, from 1865 to 1869. 
John D. Evans, from 1869 to 1871. 
John C. Shoemaker, from 1871 to 1873. 
James A. Wildman, from 1873 to 1875. 
Ebenezer Henderson, from 1875 to 1879. 
Mahlon D. Manson, from 1879 to . 



TREASURERS OF STATE. 

Daniel C. Lane, from 1816 to 1823. 
Samuel Merrill, from 1823 to 1825. 
Nathan B. Palmer, from 1825 to 1841. 
George H. Dunn, from 1841 to 1844. 
Royal Mayhew, from 1844 to 1847. 
Samuel Hanna, from 1847 to 1850. 
James P. Drake, from 1850 to 1853. 
Elijah Newland, from 1853 to 1855. 
William R. Noffsinger, from 1855 to 1857. 
Aquilla Jones, from 1857 to 1859. 
Nathaniel F. Cunningham, from 1859 to 1861. 
Jonathan S. Harvey, from 1861 to 1863. 
Matthew L. Brett, from 1863 to 1865. 
John I. Morrison, from 1865 to 1867. 
Nathan Kimball, from 1867 to 1871. 
James B. Ryan, from 1871 to 1873. 
John B. Glover, from 1873 to 1875. 
benjamin C. Shaw, from 1875 to 1879. 
William Fleming, from 1879 to . 



107 

ATTORNEY GENERALS. 

James Morrison, from March 5, 1855. 
Joseph E. McDonald, from December 17, 1857. 
James G. Jones, from December 17, 1859. 
John P. Usher, from November 10, 1861. 
Oscar P. Hord, from November 3, 1862. 
Delana E. Williamson, from November 3, 1864. 
Bayless W. Hanna, from November 3, 1870. 
James C Denny, from November 6, 1872. 
Clarence A. Buskirk, from November 6, 1874. 
Thomas W. Woollen, from November 6, 1878. 



SUPERINTENDENT PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William C. Larrabee, from 1852. 
Caleb Mills, from 1855 to 1857. 
William C. Larrabee, from 1857 to 1859. 
Samuel L. Rugg, from 1859 to 1861. 
Miles J. Fletcher, from 1861 to 1862. 
Samuel K. Hoshour, from 1862. 
Samuel L. Rugg, from 1862 to 1865. 
George W. Hoss, from 1865 to 1869. 
Barnabas C. Hobbs, from 1869 to 1871. 
Milton B. Hopkins, from 1871 to 1874. 
Alexander C. Hopkins, from 1874 to 1875. 
James H. Smart, from 1875 to . 



JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

James Scott, from 1816 to 1831. 
John Johnston, from 1816 to 1817. 
Jesse L. Holman, from 1816 to 1831. 
Isaac Blackford, from 1817 to 1853. 
Stephen C. Stevens, from 1831 to 1836. 



108 

JUDGES OF THE SUPKEME COURT— Continued. 

i 

John T. McKinney, from 1831 to 1837. 
Charles Dewey, from 183d to 1847. 
Jeremiah Sullivan, from 1837 to 1846. 
Samuel E. Perkins, from 1846 to 1865. 
Thomas L. Smith, from 1847 to 1853. 
Andrew Davison, from 1853 to 1865. 
William L. Stewart, from 1853 to 1857. 
Addison L. Roach, from 1853 to 1854. 

Alvin P. Hovey, (appointed), from to 1854. 

Samuel B. Gookins, from 1854 to 1857. 

James L. Worden, (appointed), from 1858 to 1865. 

James M. Hanna, (appointed), from 1858 to 1865. 

Charles A. Ray, from 1865 to 1871. 

Jehu 1\ Elliott, from 1865 to 1871. 

James S. Frazier, from 1865 to 1871. 

Robert S. Gregory, from 1865 to 1871. 

James L. Worden, from 1871 to — — . 

Alexander C. Downey, from 1871 to 1877. 

Samuel H. Buskirk, from 1871 to 1877. 

John Pettit, from 1871 to 1877. 

Andrew L. Osborn, from 1872 to 1874. 

Horace P. Biddle, from 1874 to . 

William £. Niblack, from 1877 to . 

George V. Howk, from 1877 to . 

Samuel E. Perkins, from 1877 to . 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 

Class 1. James Noble, from 1816 to 1831. 

Class 3. Waller Taylor, from 1816 to 1825. 

Class 3. William Hendricks, from 1825 to 1837. 

Class 1. Robert Hanna (appointed), 1831. 

Class 1. John Tipton, 1831 to 1839. 

Class 3. Oliver H. Smith, from 1837 to 1843. 



109 

UNITED STATES SENATORS— Continued. • 

Class 1. Albert S. White, from 1839 to 1845. 

Class 3. Edward A. Hannagan, from 1843 to 1849. 

Class 1. Jesse D. Bright, from 1845 to 1861. 

Class 3. James Whitcomb, from 1849 to 1852. 

Class 3. Charles W. Cathcart, (appointed), from 1852 to 1853. 

Class 3. John Pettit, from 1853 to 1857. 

Class 3. Graham N. Fiteh, from 1857 to 1861. 

Class 1. Joseph A. Wright, (appointed), from 1861 to 1863. 

Class 3. Henry S. Lane, from 1861 to 1867. 

Class 1. David Turpie, 1863. 

Class 1. Thomas A. Hendricks, from 1863 to 1869. 

Class 3. Oliver P. Morton, from 1867 to 1877. 

Class 1. Daniel D. Pratt, from 1869 to 1875. 

Class 1. Joseph E. McDonald, from 1875 to . 

Class 3. Daniel W. Voorhees, (appointed), from 1877 to . 



CLERKS SUPREME COURT. 

TERRITORI A L — St a te . 

Daniel Lymmes, from 1794 to 1804. 
Henry Hurst, from 1804 to 1820. 

E. Macdonald, from 1817 to . 

Henry P. Coburn, from 1820 to 1852. 
Wm. B. Beach, from 1852 to 1860. 
Jno. P. Jones, from 1860 to 1864. 
Laz. Noble, from 1864 to 1868. 
Theodore W. McCoy, from 1868 to 1872. 
Chas. Scholl, from 1872 to 1876. 
Gabriel Schmuck, from 1876 to . 



110 

REPORTERS SUPREME COURT. 

Isaac Blackford, (one of the Judges), from 1817 to 1850. 

Horace E. Carter, from 1852 to 1853. 

Albert G. Porter, from 1853 to 1856. 

Gordon Tanner, from 1857 to 1861. 

Benjamin Harrison, from 1861 to 1863. 

Michael C. Kerr, from 1863 to 1864. 

Benjamin Harrison, from 1864 to 1869. 

James B. Black, from 1869 to 1877. 

Augustus N. Martin, from 1877 to . 



Ill 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 



NAME. 



William Hendricks 

William Hendricks 

William Hendricks 

William Prince (died) 

Jacob Call (to fill vacancy) 

Jonathan Jennirjgs 

John Test 

Ratliff Boone 

Jonathan Jennings 

John Test 

Thomas Blake 

Jonathan Jennings 

Oliver H.Smith 

Ratliff Boone 

Jonathan Jennings 

John Test 

Raliff Boone 

John Carr 

Jonathan McCarty 

Ratliff Boone 

John Ewing 

John Carr 

Amos Lane 

Jonathan McCarty 

George S. Kinnard 

Edward A. Hannagan 

Ratliff Boone 

John W. Davis 

John Carr 

Amos Lane 

Jonathan McCarty 

George S. Kinnard (died) 

William Herod (to fill vacancy)., 

Edward A. Hannagan 

Ratliff Boone 

John Ewing 

William Graham 

George H. Dunn 

James H. Rariden 

William Herod 

Albert S. White 

George H. Proffit 

John W. Davis 

John Carr 

Thomas A. Smith 

James Rariden 

William W. Wick 

Tilghman A.Howard 

George H. Proffit 

Richard W.Thompson 

Joseph L. White 

James H. Cravens 

Andrew Kennedy 

David Wallace 

Henry S. Lane 

Robert Dale Owen 

Thomas J. Henley 

Thomas Smith 

Caleb B. Smith 

William J. Brown 

John W. Davis 

Joseph A. Wright 

JohnPettit 

Samuel C. Sample 

Andrew Kennedy 

Robert Dale Owen 

Thomas J. Henley 

Thomas Smith 



District. 



Session. 



25 



26 



Years. 



1817—1818 
1819—1820 
1821—1822 
1823—1824 



1825—1826 
1827—1828 
1829—1830 
1831—1832 
1833 -1834 

1835—1836 

1837—1838 
1839—1840 
1841—1842 
1843—1844 



1845—1844 



112 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS— Continued. 



NAME. 



Caleb B. Smith 

William W. Wick '. ^,. 

John W. Davis 

Edward W. McGaughey 

John Pel tit , 

Charles W. Cathcart 

Andrew Keonedy 

Elisha Embree 

Thomas J. Henley 

John L. Robinson 

Caleb B.Smith -. 

William W. Wick 

George G. Dunn 

Richard W. Thompson 

John Pettit 

Charles W. Cathcart 

William Rockliill 

Nathaniel Albertson 

Cyrus L. Dunham 

John L. Robinson 

George W. Julian 

William J. Brown 

Willis A. Gorman 

Edward W.McGnughey 

Joseph E. McDonald 

Graham N. Fitch 

Andrew J. Harlan 

James Lockhart 

Cyrus L. Dunham 

John L. Robinson 

Samuel W. Parker 

Thomas A. Hendricks 

Willis A. Gorman 

John G. Davis 

Daniel Mace 

Graham N. Fitch 

Samuel Brenton 

Smith Miller 

William H. English 

Cyrus L. Dunham 

James H. Lane 

Samuel W. Parker 

Thomas A. Hendricks 

John G. Davis 

Daniel Mace 

Norman Eddy 

Ebenezer M. Chamberlain 

Andrew J. Harlan 

Smith Miller 

William H. English 

George G. Dunn 

Will Cumback 

David P. Holloway 

Lucien Barbour 

Harvey D.Scott 

Daniel Mace 

Schuyler Colfax 

Samuel Brenton 

John U. Pettit 

James Lockhart (died) 

William E. Niblack (to (ill vacancy) 

William H. English 

James Hughes 

James B. Foley 

David Kilgore 

James M. Gregg 

John G. Davis : 

James Wilson 

Schuyler t'olfax 

Samuel Brenton 

John U. Pettit. 

William E. Niblack 

William H. English 



Session. 



32 



Years. 



1847— 184* 



1849— 185» 



1851—1852 



1853—1854 



1855— 186S 



1859— 1M»» 



113 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS—Continued. 



NAME. 


District. 


Session. 


Years. 




3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


36 


1859—1860 












Albert G. Porter 






























John U. Pettit 








37 


1861—1862 






William M.Dunn 






























Albert S. White 












William Mitchell 














38 


1863—1864 




































Godlove S. Orth 
























William E. Niblack 


39 


1865—186 






Ralph Hill 
























Daniel W. Voorhees (seat contested) 






Henry D.Washburn (on contest) 






Godlove S. Orth 
























William E. Niblack 


40 


1867—1868 




































Godlove S. Orth 












William Williams 






John P. C. Shanks , 






William E. Niblack 


41 


1869 1870 


















John Coburn • 






Daniel W. Voorhees 






Godlove S. Orth 






Daniel D.Pratt (elected to Senate) 






James N. Tyner (vice Pratt) 






John P. C. Shanks 








William Williams 


10 
11 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 






Jasper Packard 






William E. Niblack 


42 


1871 1872 


Michael C.Kerr 




WilliamS. Holm an 






Jeremiah M. Wilson 












Daniel W. Voorhees 






Mahlon D. Manson „ , 







8 — Sec. State, 



114 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS— Continued. 



NAME. 



James N.Tvner 

John P. C. Shanks 

William Williams 

Jasper Packard 

Godlove S. Orth 

William Williams 

William E. Niblack 

Simeon K. Wolf 

William S. Holman 

Jeremiah M. Wilson 

JohnCoburn 

Morton C. Hunter 

Thomas J. Cason 

James N. Tyner 

John P. C. Shanks 

Henry B. Saylor 

Jasper Packard 

Benoni S. Fuller 

James D. Williams 

Andrew Humphreys 

Michael C. Kerr 

Nathan T.Carr 

Jeptha D.New 

William S. Holman 

Milton S. Robinson 

Franklin Landers 

Morton C. Hunter 

Thomas C. Cason 

William S. Haymond 

James L. Evans 

Andrew H. Hamilton 

John H. Baker 

Benoni S. Fuller 

Thomas B. Cobb 

Andrew Humphreys 

Nathan T.Carr 

George A. Bicknell 

Leonidas Sexton 

Thomas M. Browne ! 

Milton S.Robinson 

John Hanna 

Morton C. Hunter 

Michael D. White 

William H. Calkins 

James L. Evans 

Andrew H. Hamilton 

John H. Baker 

William Heilman 

Thomas R. Cobb 

George A. Bicknell 

Jeptha D.New 

Thomas M. Browne 

William R. Myers 

Gilbert De La Matyr 

Andrew J. Hosteller 

Godlove S. Orth 

William H. Calkins 

Calvin Cowgill 

Walpole G. Colerick 

John H. Baker 



District. 



9 
10 
11 

State. 

State. 
1 
2 

8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

1 

2 

2 

3 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

1 

2 

2 

3 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 



Session. 



44 
Part ses. 



45 
Part ses. 



Years. 



1871—1872 



1873—1874 



V 



1875—1876 



1877—1878 



1878—1879 



115 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN AT THE OCTOBER ELEC- 
TION, A. D. 1878. 

• FIEST DISTEICT. 



COUNTIES. 


i 

a 

°3 
M 

a 

OS 

k 


a 
'P 

u 

cs 

o 

fa 
3 

a 

o 
A 
En 


S 

£ 
ft 
fa* 

oS 
o 
A 
EH 




1,818 

4,677 

1,821 i 

1,954 

1,432 

2,226 


2,099 
3,258 
2,011 
2,147 
1,417 
2,167 


63 




548 




285 




345 




194 




160 






Total 


13,928 
829 


13, 099 


1,595 











SECOND DISTEICT. 



COUNTIES. 


1 

a 

o 
H 


i 

a 

3 

o 

8 


i 

to 

a 




2,318 
2,732 
2,157 
2,184 
1,552 
1,377 
1,229 
2,117 
1,651 


1,081 

1,749 

2,123 

2,146 

875 

1,219 

818 

761 

1,260 


417 


Knof 


157 




164 




317 




223 




262 






Dubois 


32 


Pike 


478 






Total 


17,317 
5,285 


12, 032 


2,103 









THIED DISTEICT. 



COUNTIES. 


S3 

a 
M 

ffl 
«" 

0> 

M 

H 
O 
V 

O 


til 

a 

ai 

fa" 

03 
H 
•3 


fa 

fl 

o 
in 




2,106 
2,090 
2,204 
2,036 
2,612 
1,202 
2,824 


1,481 
1,818 
1,009 
1,092 
1,702 
291 
1,976 




Floyd 


512 


Clark 


742 




236 










Bartholomew 


58 






Total 


15, 074 
5,705 


9,369 




Bieknell's majority 









116 

VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN— Continued. 
FOURTH DISTKICT. 



COUNTIES. 



Ohio 

Switzerland .... 

Jefferson 

Scott 

Jennings 

Eipley 

Decatur 

Rush 

Total 

New's majority 



602 
1,618 
2,624 
1,061 
1,848 
2,533 
2,543 
2,317 



15, 146 
491 



1,332 
3,110 
676 
1,884 
2,147 
2,422 
2,402 



14, 655 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 



COUNTIES. 


a 
o 
M 

a 

o 


§ 

a 

1 

02 

a 


i 

a 




1,794 
1,404 
1,499 
1,026 
4,505 
3,548 


3,398 
2,901 
1,271 
775 
2,9S3 
1,603 


92 


Franklin 


1 


Fayette ; 


25 


Union 


87 


Wayne 


448 


Eandolph 


153 






Total 


13, 776 
840 


12,936 


796 











SIXTH DISTRICT. 



NAMES. 


1 

i 


o 
H 

o 
a 

S3 
3 


< 
a 

9 

fit 
3 
q) 

« 




2,245 
2,971 
2,125 
1,872 
1,648 
3,205 
2,101 


1,648 

2,016 
1, 370 
2,898 
2,817 
2,280 
2,524 


509 


Shelby 


213 




255 




538 




120 




163 


Grant 


246 






Total 


16,167 
619 


15,548 


2,043 











117 
VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN— Continued. 

SEVENTH DISTEEICT. 



COUNTIES. 



Marion 

Morgan 

Hendricks 

Putnam 

Total 

De.La Matyr's majority 




EIGHTH DISTEICT. 







u 








"3 


a> 




5 


3 


A 




53 


w 


£ 


COUNTIES. 


m 


o 


< 




N 


a 

o 






1-5 


u 
o 


a 




< 


a 


H 




1,754 
1,555 
1,862 
2,281 


1,781 
1,573 
1,099 

1,859 


213 




316 




343 




1,101 




3,260 


2,621 


3,771 


Parke 


1,534 
918 


2,085 
1,106 


695 




490 






Total 


13, 164 
1,040 


12, 124 


4,929 











NINTH DISTEICT. 





d 


o 


| 






fit 






o 


a 


P< 


COUNTIES. 


«3 




a 




0> 

> 


a 


H 




© 




k> 




a 


a 


o 




© 


C3 
1-5 


3 




2,413 
1,948 
2,808 


2,428 
2,733 
3,068 


919 




347 




669 




1,833 
1,402 
4,211 


2,087 

717 

3,500 


991 




522 




560 




993 


977 


663 






Total 


15, 608 
98 


15,510 


4,571 











118 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN— Continued. 
TENTH DISTRICT. 



COUNTIES. 


.2 
M 

W 

g 

g 


w" 

a 
a 

60 
U 

o 

2 


<o 

a 

a 

M 
CO 

a 

o 

i-s 


St. Joseph 


2,995 

3,218 

1,351 

1,618 

929 

1,060 

321 

711 

1,333 

1,829 


3,271 

3,101 

493 

974 

434 

551 

534 

816 

1,222 

2,012 


521 


Laporte 


234 




1,704 


Lake 


146 




465 




493 




220 




527 


White 


598 


Carroll 


344 






Total 


15, 365 
1,957 


13, 408 


5,252 


Calkins' majority 









ELEVENTH DISTRICT. 







B 








=3 




- 




a 






3 


M 






60 


t>» 


* 




t 


ft 


COUNTIES. 


8 


ft 


s 




a 


T3 


13 




t» 


■p 


> 






03 


OJ 




o 


ft 


ft 




2,750 
884 
2,278 
2,664 
1,361 
2,640 
2,970 


1,263 
1,600 
1,283 
2,639 
1,389 
2,746 
2,182 


1,077 
427 


Tipton , 




434 


Cass 


1,093 


Fulton 


431 




226 




178 






Total 


15, 547 


13,102 


4,266 




1,445 











TWELFTH DISTRICT. 







M 
















■a 


SK 






















a 


13 




COUNTIES. 


o 

9 


3 






"3 


03 






Pi 

'ol 


£ 






e= 


o 




1,974 


752J 


Blackford 


893 
1,829 
6,676 
1,585 
1,705 
2,405 


741 


Wells 


1,497 I 
2, 838 


Allen 




856 ! 


Whitley 


1,767 i 


Huntington 


1,261 j 








Total 


17,067 
7,355 


9,712 


Colerick's majority 









119 



VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN— Continued. 

THIRTEENTH DISTRICT. 



COUNTIES. 


j 

m 

el 
ja 
o 


3a 

M 

a 

o 
i-s 


: — . ■ ■■ eaae 

I 

d 

a 




1,526 
2,994 
3,309 
1,628 
2,086 
1,887 
1,754 


2,000 
2,406 
2,619 
854 
2,464 
2,168 
1,012 


1 106 






Elkhart 








Noble 




DeEalb 












Total 


15, 184 
1,661 


13, 523 


3 462 











120 



FINES AND FORFEITURES. 

To the Hon. John E. Neff, 

Secretary of State: 

Sir: — I have the honor to report, in pursuance of section 11 of 
the act relating to the office of Attorney-General (acts of regular 
session, 1873, page 20,) the following as the fines assessed and for- 
feitures entered in the several counties of the State from November 
1, 1877, to November 1, 1878, as reported to me: 



COUNTIES. 


Fines. 


Forfeitures. 


Total. 




$2,176 00 
978 00 


§3,200 00 
25 00 


$5,376 00 




1,003 00 
























111 04 


50 00 


161 04 






Carroll . 


140 00 




140 00 
















Clay. 


640 00 
145 00 




640 00 






145 00 










73 00 
662 03 




73 00 






662 03 










31 11 




31 11 










264 00 

96 00 

11 00 

155 00 

325 00 




264 00 


250 00 
350 00 


346 00 




361 00 




155 00 




150 00 


475 00 








85 00 
342 00 




85 00 






342 00 










415 00 




415 00 










51 00 
405 00 
140 01 
979 40 




51 00 




405 00 






140 01 






979 40 


























75 00 




75 00 










1, 274 01 

234 03 

1,164 01 




1,274 01 




2, 000 00 


2,234 03 




1, 164 01 










276 00 
911 00 
229 50 

281 66 
849 00 




276 00 






911 00 






229 50 






281 66 






849 00 










1,818 00 
35 00 


5, 950 00 


7, 768 on 




35 00 



121 



FINES AND FORFEITURES— Continued. 



COUNTIES. 


Fines. 


Forfeitures. 


Total. 




$650 27 
743 00 
111 00 
468 02 


$550 00 
1,000 00 


$1,200 27 




1, 743 00 




111 00 






468 02 










142 00 
4 33 
10 00 
53 00 




142 00 


Noble 




4 33 


Ohio 




10 00 






53 00 










16 00 
503.52 




16 00 






503 52 


Pike 
















399 00 


150 00 


549 00 








1,141 00 


1,335 00 


2,476 00 






127 00 
284 00 


100 00 


227 00 




284 00 


Scott 






Shelby 










21 50 




21 50 


















225 21 




225 21 










19 01 




19 01 








Tipton 


263 00 
142 00 




263 00 






142 00 










6 07 


300 00 


306 07 








571 00 
46 00 
275 00 




571 00 






46 00 






275 00 
















Wells 


76 00 
120 00 
38 00 


500 00 


576 00 


White 


120 00 


Whitley '. 




38 00 










$21,826 70 


$15,910 00 


$37,736 70 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. A. BUSKIRK, 

Attorney-General of Indiana. 



9 — Sec. State. 






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I 



ANNUAL RERORT 



AUDITOR OF STATE 



■ 



STATE OF INDIANA, 



SHOWING THE KECEIPTS AND DISBUESEMENTS AND OTHER TRANS- 
ACTIONS OF THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT DURING THE 
FISCAL YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1878. 



TO THE G-OVEB2STOE. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL COMPANY, STATE PRINTERS. 
1878. 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, EXECUTIVE DEPAETMENT, \ 

Governob's Office. j 

Eeceived December 13, 1878. 

Examined by the Governor, and transmitted to tbe Secretary of State to be filed 
and preserved in his office, and published as ordered by the Commissioners of the 
Public Printing. 

SAMUEL E. DOWNEY, 

Secretary, Governor's Office. 

Filed in my office December 13, 1878. • 

JOHN E. NEFF, 

Secretary of State. 



INTRODUCTION. 



STATE OF INDIANA, 

Office of Auditor of State, 
Indianapolis, Ind., November 1, 1878. 

To his Excellency, James D. Williams, 

Governor of the State of Indiana : 

In compliance with law, I have the honor to submit for your ex- 
amination and the consideration of the Legislature my annual re- 
port of the financial transactions of the State for the fiscal year 
beginning November 1, 1877, and ending October 31, 1878. This 
report embraces the balances in the various funds at the close of 
the last fiscal year, the receipts and disbursements during the year, 
and balances on hand to the credit of the several funds at the date 
of this report. 

THE FUNDS OF THE TREASURY 

are now classified as follows : General Fund, Common School 
Fund, School Revenue for Tuition, College Fund Principal, Col- 
lege Fund Interest, Swamp Land Fund, Fund of Unclaimed 
Estates, Three Per Cent. Fund, Sinking Fund (excess of bids), 
and New State House Fund. Each of these funds have their sub- 
ordinate accounts of receipts and disbursements, which -are balanced 
into the fund, enabling you to trace the sources of revenues and the 
disbursements of the State government. 

THE GENERAL FUND, 

which consists principally of the revenue paid by County Treasur- 
ers, collected from the people by levy regulated by the Legislature* 



is the principal fund of the treasury ; the disbursements therefrom 
cover the ordinary and extraordinary expenses of the State. This 
fund is exclusively under the control of the Legislature, and for 
the maximum of its expenditures they are responsible. For in- 
formation and convenience of the Legislature at its coming session, 
I have subdivided the expenditures from the General Revenue 
Fund into the following classifications of the cost of the State gov- 
ernment, viz : Administrative, Judicial, Benevolent, Penal, Edu- 
cational, Agricultural, Horticultural, Public Printing and Station- 
ery, State Board of Equalization, Principal State Debt, Interest 
State Debt, Revenue Refunded, Specific Appropriations, Miscellane- 
ous, Contingent, and Cost of Legislation. Each of these classifica- 
tions may be studied and analyzed with profit to the Legislature 
and taxpayers generally. If any branch of the State government 
under the control of the Administrative, Judicial, Penal, or Benev- 
olent boards ■ is extravagant, reckless or careless with public funds, 
it can be reached and the remedy applied by a change through the 
Legislature. 

A comparison of these classifications of expense with the same of 
former years, and with those of other States, the actual cost of pro- 
visions, clothing, wages, etc., the cost to the State per capita for the 
care of the unfortunate in our benevolent institutions, is the proper 
study of the legislature and the financial officers of the State. It 
is the duty of the Auditor of State, at each bi-ennial session of the 
Legislature, to lay before that body an estimate, in detail, of the nec- 
essary appropriations to meet the economical expenditures of the 
State for the ensuing two years, distinguishing between each object 
of expenditure, provided for by permanent or temporary appropria- 
tions. In my report to the legislature two years ago I called atten- 
tion to the expenses of the State institutions, which I repeat : " It is 
but reasonable to expect that the expenses of some of the benevo- 
lent institutions will meet with a considerable reduction the coming 
year. This conclusion is based upon the fact that provisions, wear- 
ing apparel, fuel, and almost every material which is necessary in 
properly conducting these institutions, can be procured for less than 
during former years, and, while every branch of business is being 
transacted with less expense, I can conceive of no reason why the 
same changes can not be effected in these institutions, and work out 
a like result. I do not wish to be understood as advocating a pol- 
icy toward the benevolent institutions — of which the citizens are so 
justly proud — that would, in the least, deprive the unfortunate in- 



mates of the tender care and attention that they now receive at the 
hands of their managers, for, in my opinion, this object should be 
paramount to every consideration. 

" Yet, viewing this matter in the interests of the tax-payers of the 
State, I hope my sympathy toward these institutions will not be 
questioned when I give expression to a reasonable hope that the 
State will meet with some relief by a reduction of these expenses 
in the coming year. Under the present law, the expenditures of 
these institutions are under the direction and control of the Board 
of Commissioners, or Trustees, which is proper and right." 

I know the tax-payers cheerfully pay taxes to provide ample 
accommodations and the best of food for the unfortunate who 
occupy our benevolent institutions ; but if values shrink, if provis- 
ions and clothing are cheap, if wages for help are low, the cost per 
capita for maintenance must decrease in the same ratio, or the mana- 
gers subject themselves to the charge of extravagance. In making a 
recommendation for an appropriation, to be expended by order of a 
Board of Trustees, it is proper to make it sufficiently large to meet the 
expenses of the institution filled to its utmost capacity, but it is not 
expected by the legislature that an appropriation for operating one 
of our institutions shall all be used simply because the maximum 
amount has been set apart, available if required. If the legislature 
had appropriated $ 100,000 for Sheriff's Mileage for the year 1878, 
but $19,374.02 would have been used; if it appropriate twice the 
amount necessary for the support of the Insane or Blind, only the 
amount to economically support them should be used; but the records 
show, as a general rule, the exhaustion of the entire appropriation. 
Therefore, it is necessary to be exact in calculating what is neces- 
sary. • The general appropriation bill of two years ago contained, 
in compliance with the recommendation in my report, the following 
provision in reference to the receipts of the State institutions: 

" dollars is hereby appropriated, which shall include the re- 
ceipts and earnings, as well as the amount paid by counties for clothing 
and otherwise, the amount paid by the United States for the care of 
prisoners, the wages of convicts, profits of shops, and all other 
receipts, all of which shall be covered into the State Treasury. And 
out of such appropriation shall be paid the salaries and per diem of 
all Directors, Commissioners, Managers, Wardens, Superintendents, 
Physicians, Moral Instructors, and all other officers and agents of 
the several institutions. These moneys shall be drawn out in the 
manner provided by law, and for all expenditures therefrom the 



original bills, receipts, and vouchers shall be returned to the Audi- 
tor of State at each monthly or quarterly settlement." 

This provision, by some oversight or otherwise, was only applied 
to the penal and reformatory institution. It was intended by me, 
in the recommendation, to apply to all institutions, including Insane, 
Deaf and Dumb, and Blind. Why these Institutions should not 
pay into the State Treasury their receipts from counties, receipts 
from sales of hides and tallow, donations for the maintenance of 
the incurable insane, and all other receipts, I am unable to see. 
These three institutions have each claimed from the State Treasury 
the full appropriation, in addition to the receipts from the counties 
for clothing. These clothing receipts go into the State treasury, 
but are credited to the institutions, in addition to the appropriations, 
and are drawn out for current expenses. I believe it was the inten- 
tion of the Legislature, when it appropriated one hundred and 
twenty thousand dollars for the current expenses, and ten thousand 
dollars for repairs of the Hospital for the Insane, that said amounts 
should be the maximum cost of the institution to the tax-payers of 
the State. I earnestly recommend the provision quoted from the 
appropriation act, to apply to all institutions supported by the State. 
My experience as Auditor of public accounts has taught me that, as 
a rule, an appropriation authorized is generally used. 

There are creditable exceptions which I shall point out in this 
report by a tabulated statement of unexpended appropriations cov- 
ered into the General Fund on the 31st day of October, 1878. The 
law governing annual reports of the superintendents and officers of 
all State Institutions should require an inventory to be taken at the 
close of each fiscal year by the officer in charge, and published with, 
and form a part of the printed report, and such inventory should 
specify the number and cost of all buildings, the quality and value 
of all lands, the quality and value of all furniture, the amount and 
value of all products raised and on hand; the number, value and 
kind of live stock, agricultural and horticultural implements, num- 
ber and character of vehicles, office and household goods of every 
description, steam engines, and all property of the State connected 
with the institution, specifying and classifying every article, giving 
the original cost and present value. This requirement would fur- 
nish valuable information to the legislative committees and citizens 
of the State generally. 

Any consolidation of boards of managers or trustees of public 
institutions, on the plea of reform, would, in my judgment, be det- 
rimental to the interests of the State. The small salary paid is well 
invested for the benefit of comparison of management. 



INSUFFICIENCY OF SPECIAL JUDICIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

In my report to your Excellency one year ago, I presented the 
embarrassment to this department occasioned by the insufficiency of 
some of the stipulated appropriations to meet the demands of the 
public service. I quote from pages 4 and 5 of Auditor's Report of 
1877: 

"Some of the appropriations have been in excess of the actual 
expenditures, others insufficient to meet the demands of the public 
service. Some embarrassment has been experienced in this office 
on account of the latter class of stipulated appropriations being 
insufficient to meet the demands of public necessity. There can be 
no economy in embarrassing any branch of our State government 
by insufficient appropriations to meet its economical administration. 
There are classes of expenditures governed by circumstances of the 
future, that a legislature can not foresee. The expense of sheriff's 
mileage is governed by the number of criminals convicted in the 
various courts, and sentenced to the State prisons. Judiciary 
special varies in proportion to the changes of venue. The enforce- 
ment of the laws of the State may be seriously interfered with by 
an inadequate appropriation for services of special judges or attor- 
neys, called to hold court by reason of change of venue from the 
regular judge for various causes, that must arise in a state like ours, 
where circuit judges are elected by the people, and their term of 
office so short. A judge selected from the bar where he has been 
practicing for years, is necessarily rendered incompetent to try 
many of the cases on his docket, by reason of previous employment. 
In such cases the rights of litigants should be protected by ample 
provision for a speedy trial, that justice may be administered 
1 speedily, and without delay.' I recommended in my last report an 
appropriation of eight thousand dollars for special judicial services 
for the fiscal year of 1878, and the legislature appropriated five 
thousand dollars, and increased the pay for such services, from five 
dollars per day under the old law, to eight dollars per day under 
the new act, ' burning the candle, as it were, at both ends.' The 
result of which will be an exhaustion of the appropriation before 
one-third of the year has expired. The abuse of an appropriation 
for special services by exchanging circuits, (Judge A. holding Judge 
B.'s court, and vice versa, both judges drawing for special services,) is 
the exception to the rule, and should have been provided against in 
the act; but the salary of a judge, in cases of change of venue, 



should ncT stop by reason of incompetency to hold his own court, 
and a sufficient appropriation should have been made to meet the 
requirements of these circumstances." 

When the appropriation of $ 5,000 for 1878, for such services, 
was exhausted, I asked the Attorney General for his construction of 
Section 5, of the Act approved March 7, 1877, entitled "An act to 
provide for the more speedy trial of causes, etc., fixing the compen- 
sation of Judges called to hold special terms, etc., etc." On receipt 
of his opinion I prepared the following circular letter in reply to 
the many inquiries on the subject: 

" STATE OF INDIANA, 
" Office of Auditor of State. 

"Dear Sir: August 17, 1877, I addressed a communication to 
Hon. C. A. Buskirk, Attorney General, asking his construction of 
Section 5, of an Act approved March 7, 1877, entitled 'An Act to 
provide for the more speedy trial of causes, etc., fixing the compen- 
sation of Judges called to hold special terms, etc., etc' 

"The Attorney General reasoned that the appropriation act, 
approved March 10, 1877, three days later than the act providing 
for the pay of special Judicial services by County Treasurers, might, 
in effect, repeal that part of the former act providing for the 
payment of special Judges by County Treasurers. The latter 
act, the General Appropriation Act, appropriates a specific amount 
for a stipulated time for such special services, 'that shall be 
held to include all appropriations made or expenditures authorized 
by any existing law for said term, on account of the offices, officers, 
institutions and services herein named.' 

" His conclusions were that such services should be paid at the 
rate fixed in said act of March 7th, upon warrants issued against the 
State Treasury by the Auditor of State, under the general law 
relating to payments out of the State Treasury. The appropriation 
of $5,000 for the fiscal year beginning November 1, 1877, and 
ending October 31, 1878, is exhausted; therefore no such warrant 
can issue until the appropriation of 1879 becomes available, (Nov. 
1, 1878). I am compelled to return to you your certificate of 
allowance, having no appropriation to issue on. 

"With great respect, I remain, yours truly, 

"E. HENDERSON, 

" Auditor of State." 



When the current appropriation of 1879 (November 1, 1878,) 
became available, I again requested his opinion, as follows : 

Auditor of State's Office, 

October 29, 1878. 

Hon. C. A. Buskirk, Attorney-General : 

Dear Sir: The general appropriation act of March 10, 1877, 
appropriated for the payment of special Judges, and Judges at 
special terms, as the same may be provided for by law, $5,000 for 
the fiscal year beginning November 1, 1877, and ending October 
31, 1878, and a similar sum for the fiscal year beginning November 
1, 1878, and ending October 31, 1879. Before the middle of the 
year, January, 1878, this appropriation was exhausted by warrants 
drawn on the State treasury for such special services, and during 
the remainder of the fiscal year no warrant has been drawn, allow- 
ing such claims to accumulate in the hands of the owners. Now, 
on the first day of November, 1878, a similar appropriation for the 
fiscal year beginning November 1, 1878, and ending October 31, 1879, 
becomes available. 

* The legal question I desire your opinion on is, whether, under 
section 1 of the appropriation act, which reads, " That for the pur- 
pose of meeting the expenses of the State government and its insti- 
tutions during the terms herein named, there is hereby appropriated 
from the general fund of the treasury the following named sums of 
money, which sums shall be held to include all appropriations made 
or expenditures authorized by any existing law for said terms on 
account of the offices, officers, institutions and services herein named," 
can I use the appropriation of 1879 to meet the deficiency of 1878, 
or will it be my duty to ask the Legislature for a specific appropri- 
ation covering the services rendered the State for such special 
judicial services rendered during the fiscal year ending October 31, 
1878? Your prompt reply is respectfully asked. 

E. HENDERSON, 

Auditor of State. 



10 

Office of Attorney-General, 

Indianapolis, October 30, 1878. 

Hon. E. Henderson, Auditor of State : 

Dear Sir: I have the honor of acknowledging the receipt of 
your communication of yesterday on the subject of the appropria- 
tions made for the payment of special judges. 

I am of opinion that an appropriation made for a given fiscal 
year, under the last general appropriation act, can be used for that 
period of time only. The relief will have to come through the 
Legislature, in the form of a deficiency appropriation. 

Permit me to add that it seems to me that the Legislature should 
not limit the amount to be paid for services required by law when 
such services are proved under the requirements of law. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

C. A. BUSKIEK, 

Attorney-General. 

By reason of the appropriation being insufficient to meet special 
services of courts, it is necessary for the Legislature to pass a de- 
ficiency appropriation, covering the certificates of County Clerks for 
such special services, now held by Judges and attorneys. The 
amount of such outstanding certificates not being known to me, I 
recommend a section in the specific appropriation bill to read, " The 
Auditor of State is authorized to audit and issue his warrant for 
special judicial services rendered prior to November 1, 1878, as 
certified to by County Clerks as provided for by law, and for this 

purpose dollars is hereby appropriated." In my opinion 

the outstanding certificates will amount to near seven thousand 
dollars. As a remedy for this expenditure from the State revenue, 
I recommend the repeal of the act of 1877, providing for the pay of 
special judicial services from the State treasury, and the passage of 
a law requiring such services to be paid from the county revenue, 
where the necessity for such special service arises. I also call the 
attention of the Legislature to an oversight in the appropriations of 
1877, 1878 and 1879. 

A Superior Court was created for Wayne county with a salary 
from the State of $1,000, and no provision made for its payment. 

Your Excellency appointed Hon. W. A. Bickle, Judge. On 
October 29, 1878, he addressed me the following letter, enclosing 



11 

therewith his account against the State. I ask an appropriation of 
$1,697.95, covering salary and interest on each quarter, as set forth 
in the following account : 

Richmond, Ind., Oct. 29, 1878. 
Hon. E. Henderson, Auditor, etc. : ^ 

Dear Sir : — I enclose my account against the State, in which 
you will see that I have calculated interest from the falling due of 
each quarterly indebtedness. 

I do not know whether the State pays interest in such cases. I 
do not know why she should not, after promising by law to pay me 
and neglecting to make appropriations to do so. 

Very truly and respectfully yours, etc. 

WM. A. BICKLE. 

THE STATE OF INDIANA. 

To Wm. A. Bickle, Br. 

For Salary as Judge of the Superior Court, of Wayne 
County, State of Indiana, from the 10th of March, 
1877, to the 28th of October, 1878, inclusive, being 1 
year 7 months and 19 days, at $1,000 per year, 

payable quarterly after the 1st day of April, 1877 $1,636 10 

Interest due on each quarter from the 1st of 
July, 1877, being $250 at each payment, and 
one year 3 months 27 days, on 1st quarter.... $19 87 

1 year 3 months 27 days, on 2d quarter 16 12 

9 months 27 days, on 3d quarter 12 37 

6 months 27 days, on 4th quarter 8 62 

3 months 27 days, on 5th quarter 4 87 6185 

$1,697 95 
Interest to payment from 27th October, 1878 



12 



ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES for Conducting the State Gov- 
ernment for the years 1880 and 1881. 

Inasmuch as the necessary appropriations were made by the Leg- 
islature of 1877 for the year 1879, the years 1880 and 1881 are the 
proper ones to give estimates for. A great majority of the estimates 
are the same as given by statute, which governs the amount required, 
but in order for the legislature to know what amount is necessary, 
in total, to meet the expenses for the two years, all are given. 





For Year 1880 


Total for 1880 


For Year 1881 


Total for 1881. 


Executive and Administrative. 


$6, 000 00 

2, 000 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

800 00 

300 00 

5, 000 00 

i 

5, 000 00 

500 00 

2,000 00 

2,500 00 

1,200 00 

500 00 

900 00 

2,500 00 

3, 000 00 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,500 00 

5,000 00 

3, 000 00 

2..000 00 

700 00 

500 00 

3,000 00 

1, 500 00 

500 00 

2,500 00 

1, 800 00 

1, 000 00 

1,000 00 

1,200 00 

750 00 

1,200 00 

1,000 00 

1, 000 00 

2,000 00 

500 00 

$20, 000 00 

1,200 00 
200 00 
720 00 

2,500 00 

5, 000 00 

107,500 00 . 




$6, 000 00 

2,000 00 

1, 000 00 

600 00 

. 800 00 

; 300 oo 

5,000 00 

5, 000 00 

500 00 

2,000 00 

2,500 00 

1,200 00 

500 00 

900 00 

2,500 00 

3, 000 00 

3, 000 00 

1, 000 00 

1,500 00 

5,000 00 

3, 000 00 

2, 000 00 

700 00 

500 00 

3, 000 00 

1,500 00 

500 00 

2, 500 00 

1,800 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,200 00 

750 00 

1, 200 00 

1, 000 00 

1,000 00 

2,000 00 

500 00 

$20,000 00 

1,200 00 
200 00 
720 00 

2, 500100 

5,000X00 

107, 500 a 00 




Foi salary of Governor's Private Secretary 



































For military contingent expenses of Gov- 






















































For salary of Auditor's Insurance and Land 
Clerks 












For salary of Janitors of State Building.... 
For fuel, light, and water for State Building 






























































For salary of Superintendent's Janitor and 
















• 








For salary of State Librarian's Janitor and 






For purchase of books and papers for State 






For fuel, light, and water for State Library 








\ 








Judiciary. 
For salaries of five Supreme Judges 


$69,430 00 


$69,430 08 


For salary of Law Librarian of Supreme 






For salary of sheriff- of Supreme Court 






For salary of Janitor of Supreme Court;.... 






For chamber and office expenses of Su- 
preme Court 






For Supreme Court Reports , 






For salary of forty-three Circuit Judges.... 







13 



Judiciary— Continued. 

For salaries of forty-three Prosecuting At 
torneys 

For salaries of nine Superior Court Judges 
(State's proportion) "... 

For payment of Special Judges , 

For mileage of Sheriffs 



Agricultural and Horticultural. 



For salary of State Geologist , 

For Geological survey 

For State Agricultural Society... 
For State Horticultural Society.. 



Educational Institutions. 



For State University 

For Purdue University 

For State Normal School 

For State Board of Education.. 



Benevolent Institutions. 

For Insane Hospital, maintenance ... 

For Insane Hospital, repairs 

For Deaf and Dumb Institution 

For Blind Asylum 

For Soldiers' Orphans' Home 



Penal and Reformatory Institutions. 



For State Prison North 

For State Prison South 

For House of Refuge 

For Female Prison and Reformatory. 



Public Printing and Advertising. 

For printing, binding, stationery and ad- 
vertising 



Miscellaneous. 

For interest on Non-negotiable School 
Bonds 

For interest on Temporary Loan Bonds 

For interest on War Loan Bonds 

For interest on Internal Improvement 
Bonds 

For repairs of State Building and extraor- 
dinary expenses that may arise 

For State Board of Equalization 

For Legislation 



Total. 



For Year 1880. 



$21, 500 00 

9,000 00 
10,000 00 
20,000 00 



$3,000 00 

3,000 00 

1,500 00 

300 00 



$23, 000 00 
6,500 00 
3, 000 00 
1,000 00 



$110,000 00 
10,000 00 
50,000 00 
25,000 00 
30, 000 00 



$75, 000 00 
75,000 00 
45, 000 00 
20,000 00 



$15,000 00 



$234, 286 99 

54,600 00 

8,340 00 



10,000 00 
1,000 00 



Total for 1880. 



$197,620 00 



$7, 800 00 



$33,500 00 



$225, 000 00 



$215, 000 00 



$15, 000 00 



3,226 99 



, 071, 576 99 



For Year 1881. 



$21,500 00 

9, 000 00 
10,000 00 
20, 000 00 



$3, 000 00 

3, 000 00 

1,500 00 

300 00 



$23,000 00 
6, 500 00 
3, 000 00 
1,000 00 



$110,000 00 
10, 000 00 
50, 000 00 
25,000 00 
30,000 00 



$75, 000 00 
75, 000 00 
45, 000 00 
20, 000 00 



$30, 000 00 



$234,286 99 
54,600 00 
8,340 00 



10,000 00 

1,000 00 

120,000 00 



Total for 1881. 



$197, 620 00 



$7,800 00 



,500 00 



, 000 00 



$30,000 00- 



$429,226 99 



1,206,576 99 



TAX LEVY FOR STATE PURPOSES. 



The value of taxable property in the State, April 1, 1878, 
amounted in the aggregate to $850,616,987, showing a decrease of 
$4,573,138 on the valuation of the preceding year. On the valua- 
tion of 1878, as given above, the probable amount of taxes accru- 
ing on a levy of twelve cents on the one hundred dollars as fixed 
by the Legislature of 1877, including collections of delinquent taxes 
and polls, will approximate $1,100,000; add to this amount Circuit 



14 

and Supreme Court docket fees $35,000, insurance tax and insur- 
ance fees $50,000, earnings of the penal, reformatory, and benevo- 
lent institutions, and all other sources, $200,000. Balance on hand 
October 31, 1878, to the credit of the general fund, $363,421.41, 
gives an aggregate amount of $1,748,421.41 to meet the ordinary 
and extraordinary expenses of the State for the year 1879. The 
ordinary expenses of the State for the year, as appropriated by the 
Legislature of 1877, including the expenses of the General Assem- 
bly of 1879, will approximate $1,200,000. This leaves a balance 
of $548,421.41 for the Legislature to apply on the temporary State 
debt and extraordinary and specific purposes. The foregoing esti- 
mate of receipts is made on the basis of the twelve cent levy 
fixed by the last Legislature, and, with these receipts, in my 
judgment, the State's temporary debt can in the coming year be 
reduced at least $200,000. Seven hundred and ten thousand dol- 
lars of the State's temporary loan bonds, drawing six per cent, 
interest, fall due in the year 1879, $510,000 April 1, and $200,000 
December 1. The bonds which fall due April 1 can be renewed at 
a lower rate of interest, and those falling due December 1 can be 
redeemed without depleting the balance in the treasury to such an 
extent as to endanger the State's interests. Special appropriations 
for specific purposes will be asked for in instances where it will be 
strictly necessary to grant them. The Southern Prison should have 
additional cell houses for convicts. Parties well informed in this 
matter will not call into question the importance of an appropria- 
tion for this purpose. An additional appropriation will be neces- 
sary to complete and furnish the new Female Insane Hospital; 
also for necessary improvements for the Female Reformatory Insti- 
tution. The receipts for the year 1880 can be safely estimated at 
the same as given for the year 1879, provided the levy remains the 
same. But the levy for the year 1880, to provide receipts for the 
year 1881, can not be safely reduced, from the fact of the re-assess- 
ment of real estate occurring in that year, and it is very probable 
that a very large reduction on the total valuation will occur, owing 
to the shrinkage in the value of all classes of real estate since the 
year 1875. To what an extent this re-assessment will reduce the 
total valuation of taxable property in the State as it now exists, I 
am unable to state to a degree that is even satisfactory to myself. 
I am inclined to believe, however, judging from the prevailing 
sentiment of the citizens of the State, that it will not be less than 
twenty-five per cent. The total value of real estate and improve- 



15 

ments for the year 1878, as shown by the reports of county audi- 
tors, now on file in this office, is given at $631,981,122. Twenty- 
five per cent, reduction on this sum amounts to $157,995,280, re- 
ducing the present total valuation from $850,616,987 to $692,621,- 
707. This exigency is to be met by the Legislature, and the matter 
given careful thought before fixing the levy for 1880. The years in 
which real estate is assessed places the Legislature in an embarass- 
ing position as to fixing levies for taxes to conduct the State gov- 
ernment. This difficulty can be obviated by amending section one 
of the act approved February 11, 1875, striking out the word five 
and inserting the word six, and providing for the assessment every 
four or six years thereafter, as the Legislature may think proper. 
Real estate should be appraised in the years the Legislature meets, 
in order that correct estimates of receipts from State levy from one 
session to another may be correctly given, for, as will be observed, 
the basis of levy is the appraisement of real estate. 

DEPARTMENTS OF THE REPORT. 

I call special attention to the various departments of this report. 
The State Department, embracing the receipts and disbursements 
into and from the various funds, and the subordinate accounts of 
each; the Bank Department, embracing the savings banks and 
banks organized under the State law, the reports of examination of 
each by competent examiners, and such recommendations as are 
deemed important; the Land Department, showing the various 
divisions of lands, the manner in which the State acquired title 
from the United States, a list of lands forfeited, the lands and lots 
belonging to the State, etc. ; the Insurance Department, giving the 
fire and life companies transacting business in the State and their 
condition, and an appendix containing the proceedings of the State 
Board of Equalization in the assessment of railroad property, and 
the settlements with county treasurers and auditors for revenues 
coming into the State treasury. 

CONCLUSION. 

This is the last report I shall make as Auditor of State, haviag 
filled the office the limit, two terms, as provided by the Constitu- 
tion. I take this opportunity to express my gratitude to my polit- 
ical party for its generous preferences, and to the voters of the 
State who gave me, over honorable competitors, a handsome major- 



16 

ity at each election. The duties and responsibilities of the office 
are manifold and great, and to the efficient, industrious and honora- 
ble gentlemen who have assisted me as deputies, clerks and assist- 
ants during my term, I owe much for the clear and comprehensive 
system of public accounts, plainly set forth in each annual report. 
The State and county officers with whom I have been officially con- 
nected will ever be remembered for their prompt official duty and 
valuable counsel on matters of public interest. To your Excel- 
lency, and the Legislature, it is with pride I say, not an appropria- 
tion is overdrawn, neither has any doubtful construction permitted 
the issuing of a warrant when the law did not justify it fully. 

I have the honor to be, 

Yours, very respectfully, 

E. HENDERSON, 

Auditor of State. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



The following statement is a condensed exhibit of the balance in 
the State Treasury of each of the funds November 1, 1877; the 
amount received and disbursed during the fiscal year from the sev- 
eral funds at the close of the fiscal year October 31, 1878 : 

The amount of cash in Treasury October 31, 1877.... $405,303 27 

The above amount was the aggregate of the balance 
belonging to the various funds in the Treasury as 
follows : 

Balance in General Fund $269,237 47 

Balance in Common School Fund 1,523 28 

Balance in School Revenue for Tuition. 119,870 09 

Balance in College Fund 939 60 

Balance in College Fund Interest 233 25 

Balance in Swamp Land Fund 55 84 

Balance in Fund Unclaimed Estates.... 11,323 09 

Balance in Three Per Cent. Fund 32 13 

Balance in Sinking Fund Excess of 

Bids 2,088 52 



$405,303^27 

Receipts during the year ending October 31, 1878, from all 
sources, weres as follows : 

To General Fund $1,591,540 14 

To Common School Fund 1,168 92 

To School Revenue for Tuition 1,903,540 35 

To College Fund 9,823 23 

To College Fund Interest 8,457 44 

2 Aud. Rep. 



18 

To Swamp Land Fund $367 71 

To Fund of Unclaimed Estates 1,097 82 

To New State House Fund 42,386 37 

$3,558,381 98 
Deduct amount of transfer and refund- 
ing receipts filed during the year.. 436,950 68 

Leaves net amount receipts filed during 

the year $3,121,431 30 

Add balance in treasury October 31, 

1877 405,303 27 

Total Keceipts, including balance.. $3,526,734 57 

The amount of warrants drawn on the State Treasury 
from the several funds from October 31, 1877, to Oc- 
tober 31, 1878, are as follows : 

From General Fund $1,497,356 20 

From School Revenue for Tuition 1,899,238 67 

From College Fund 8,500 00 

From College Fund Interest 7,730 50 

From Swamp Land Fund 38 44 

From Fund of Unclaimed Estates 169 84 

From New State House Fund 26,295 14 

Total amount warrants drawn during 

year $3,439,328 79 

Deduct amount transfer and refunding 

warrants 436,950 Q8 

Leaves net cash disbursements from the 

treasury during year 3,002,378 11 

"Which being deducted from total re- 
ceipts, leaves cash in Treasury Oc- 
tober 31,1878 $524,356 46 

The above balance of cash in Treasury October 31, 
1878, consists of balance of the various funds as fol- 
lows : 

Balance in the General Fund $363,421 41 

Balance in Common School Fund 2,692 20 



19 



Balance in School Revenue for Tuition. $ 124 ; 171 77 

Balance in College Fund 2,262 83 

Balance in College Fund Interest 960 19 

Balance in Swamp Land Fund 385 11 

Balance in Fund of Unclaimed Estates. 12,251 07 

Balance in Three Per Cent. Fund 32 13 

Balance in Sinking Fund Excess of Bids 2,088 52 

Balance in New State House Funds.... 16,091 23 



$524,356 46 



DETAILED STATEMENT of Receipts and Disbursements of 
the Treasury by Funds. 

GENERAL FUND. 

Receipts. 

From Insane Hospital — Collection of 

Clothing Accounts from Counties.. $15,715 30 

From Deaf and Dumb Institution — 
Collection of Clothing Accounts 
from Counties 5,085 42 

From Blind Asylum — Amount refund- 
ed to correct an error 100 00 

From Blind Asylum — Collection of 

Clothing Accounts from Counties.. 946 65 

From State Prison North— Earnings .. . 69,676 13 

From State Prison South — Earnings... 34,745 29 

From House of Refuge — Collection of 

Clothing Accounts from Counties. 23,192 23 

From House of Refuge — Earnings of 

Inmates and Farm Products 5,536 73 

From Female Prison and Reformatory 

Institution — Earnings of Inmates. 45 05 

From Female Prison and Reformatory 
Institution — Collection of Cloth- 
ing Accounts from Counties 9,520 37 

From Temporary Loan of 1878 — re- 
. newal 200,000 00 

From Docket Fees Supreme Court 1,410 00 



20 

From Kevenue of 1876 $520,293 13 

From Delinquent Kevenue of 1876 72,561 72 

From Docket Fees Circuit Court 33,162 33 

From Insurance Fees 14,624 00 

From Insurance Tax 36,292 00 

From Miscellaneous Receipts to Gen- 
eral Fund 222 32 

From Revenue of 1877 548,411 47 

Total ■ $1,591,540 14, 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND. 

Receipts. 

From Sales of Saline Lands $1,168 92 

1,168 92 



SCHOOL REVENUE FOE TUITION FUND. 

Receipts. 

From General Fund interest on non- 
negotiable school bonds $234,286 99 

From School Tax, 1876 655,554 99 

From Delinquent School Tax, 1876 ... 89,850 76 

From School Tax, 1877 723,440 55 

From School Fund interest from coun- 
ties 198,526 43 

From Unclaimed'Fees 1,880 63 

Total 1,903,540 35 

COLLEGE FUND. 

From College^Fund loans collected $8,237 00 

From sales of University Lands 1,586 23 

Total 9,823 23 

COLLEGE FUND INTEREST. 

From collections of interest on loans... $8,133 52 
From College Fund damages 197 78 



21 

HVom College Fund costs $126 14 

Total $8,457 44 

SWAMP LAND FUND. 

JVom sales of Swamp Lands $367 71 

Total 367 71 

FUND OF UNCLAIMED ESTATES. 

From collections from various counties $1,097 82 

Total 1,097 82 

NEW STATE HOUSE FUND. 

Trom New State House Tax, 1877 $42,023 56 

Miscellaneous receipts from sales of old 

building, etc 362 81 

Total 42,386 37 

Total amount of Treasurer's re- 
ceipts filed during year $3,558,381 98 

Deduct amount of transfer and refund- 
ing receipts 436,950 68 

Xeaves net receipts to the Treasury dur- 
ing year $3,121,431 30 

GENERAL FUND. 

Disbursements. 

Tor Governor's salary $6,000 00 

J"or Governor's Private Secretary, sal- 
ary 2,166 67 

For Governor's clerk, salary 1,083 32 

For Governor's janitor 665 00 

JFor Adjutant-General's salary 933 32 

JFor Quartermaster-General's salary 300 00. 

For Governor's civil contingent ex- 
penses 281 05 



22 



For Governor's military contingent ex- 
penses 83,186 45 

For Governor's office expenses 247 26 

For Secretary of State, salary 2,000 00 

For salary of Secretary of State's dep- 
uty." 1,500 00 

For salary of Secretary of State's clerk 1,000 00 

For salary of the Clerk of Printing 

Bureau 900 00 

For distribution of laws 900 00 

For office expenses of Secretary of State 500 00 

For Auditor of State's salary 2,500 00 

For salary of Auditor of State's depu- 
ty and clerk 3,000 0O 

For salary of Auditor of State's insu- 
rance and land clerks 3,000 00 

For office expenses of Auditor of State 1,000 00 

For salaries of janitor of State build- 
ing $1,500 00 

For fuel, light and water, State build- 
ing 1,399 56 

For Treasurer of State's salary 3,000 OQ 

For Treasurer of State's clerk's salary. 2,000 00 

For Treasurer of State's watchman 720 00 

For Treasurer of State's office expenses 497 96 

For Attorney-General's salary 3,000 00 

For Attorney-General's clerk's salary .. 1,500 00 

For Attorney-General's office expenses. 500 00 

For salary of Superintendent of Public 

Instruction 2,500 00 

For salaries of Superintendent's clerks 1,800 00 

For pay for rent and janitor of Super- 
intendent's office 1,000 00 

For Superintendent's traveling ex- 
penses 1,000 00 

For State Librarian's salary 1,200 00 

For salary of State Librarian's assist- 
ant 750 00 

For salaries of State Librarian's janitor 

and watchman 1,200 00 



23 



For books and binding for State Li- 
brary $969 97 

For fuel, light and water State Library 342 20 
For State Librarian's incidental ex- 
penses 169 35 

For Supreme Court Judges' salaries.... 20,000 00 

For Law Librarian's salary 1,200 00 

For Sheriff Supreme Court's salary 224 05 

For salary of janitor Supreme Court... 720 00 

For office expenses Supreme Court 1,576 17 

For Supreme Court Reports 5,502 00 

For Circuit Court Judges' salaries 105,458 43 

For Prosecuting Attorneys' salaries 20,361 80 

For Superior Court Judges' salaries 9,035 25 

For special services of Judges 5,002 16 

For Sheriffs' mileage 19,374 02 

For State Board of Agriculture 7,500 00 

For State Board of Agriculture, old in- 
debtedness 10,000 00 

For State Horticultural Society 300 00 

For State Board of Education 969 71 

For State Board of Equalization 806 80 

For Insane Hospital maintenance 122,412 48 

For Insane Hospital repairs 9,717 19 

For Female Insane Hospital, new build- 
ing 180,801 62 

For Deaf and Dumb Institution 62,997 99 

For Blind Asylum 31,378 25 

For Sold iers' Orphan Home 34,000 00 

For State Prison North, current ex- 
penses 75,276 13 

For State Prison North, extra pay of 

Deputy Warden and Chaplain 400 00 

For State Prison North, new cell-house 20,920 99 
For State Prison South, current ex- 
penses 67,588 57 

For State Prison South, extra pay of 

Deputy Warden and Chaplain 400 00 

For State Prison South, new foundry 

building 8,500 00 

For House Refuge, current expenses . . . 43,000 00 



24 

For House Refuge, old debts $2,600 00 

For Female Prison and Reformatory 

Institution 21,500 00 

For State University 23,000 00 

For State Normal School 3,068 20 

For Purdue University 6,930 43 

For public printing 6,696 84 

.For public stationery 1,332 49 

For interest on non-negotiable School 

Bonds (a transfer amount) 234,286 99 

For interest on Temporary Loan Bonds 54,600 00 

For interest on War Loan Bonds 8,340 00 

For interest on Internal Improvement 

Bonds 800 00 

For principal of Internal Improvement 

Bonds 1,900 00 

For principal of Five per Cent. State 

Stocks 2,000 00 

For principal of Two-and-one-half per 

Cent. State Stocks 360 00 

For interest on Five per Cent. State 

Stocks 8 33 

For general and miscellaneous expenses 

of the State government 7,677 08 

For principal of Temporary Loan 

Bonds of 1875 200,000 00 

For revenue of 1877 refunded 592 19 

For Insurance Tax 1878, overpayment 

refunded 27 93 

Total $1,497,356 20 



SCHOOL REVENUE FOR TUITION. 

For School Tax 1876 — overpayment 

refunded $278 69 

For School Tax 1877 — overpayment 

refunded 95 6Q 

For School Fund Interest — overpay- 
ment refunded 1,478 72 



25 

For distribution of School Revenue to 

the counties for January, 1878 $869,206 90 

For distribution of School Revenue to 

the counties for May, 1878 1,028,178 70 

Total #1,899,238167 

COLLEGE FUND. 

For Distribution Fund on Loans $8,500 00 

Total 8,500 00 

COLLEGE FUND INTEREST. 

For Professors' Salaries at State Uni- 
versity $6,520 00 

For Excess of Bids on College Fund 

Land Sales 176 65 

For College Fund expenses 365 06 

For overpayment of interest refunded. 90 50 

For College Fund damages 362 29 

For College Fund costs 216 00 

Total 7,730 50 

SWAMP LAND FUND. 

For expense of issuing Certificates and 

Patents $38 44 

Total 38 44 

FUND OF UNCLAIMED ESTATES. 

For amount refunded to heirs $169 84 

Total 169 84 

NEW STATE HOUSE FUND. 

For New Building and Miscellaneous 

Expenses $14,687 06 

For Salaries of Commissioners 6,611 00 

For Salary of Secretary 1,779 22 

For Pay of Experts 3,217 86 

Total 26,295 14 



26 

Total amount warrants drawn dur- 
ing the year $3,439,328 79 

Less amount of transfer and refunding 

warrants 436,950 68 



Leaves net cash disbursements from 

the Treasury during year $3,002,378 11 



SUMMARY. 

Net cash receipts during year $3,121,431 30 

Deduct net cash disbursements during year 3,002,378 11 

Leaves excess of receipts over disbursements $119,053 19 

Add balance cash in Treasury October 31, 1877 405,303 27 

Makes balance cash in Treasury October 31, 1878.... $524,356 46 



ACCOUNTS OF THE STATE TREASURY, 



In the order laid down in the General Appropriation Act of 1877, 
for the year ending October 31, 1878. 

FOE THE EXPENSES OF THE GOVERNOR'S OFFICE. 

Governor's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn 1500 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 6,000 00 

To amount of salary drawn during 

year $6,000 00 

To amount of salary undrawn at close 

of year 500 00 

$6,500 00 $6,500 00 



Governor's Private Secretary's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $166 67 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 2,000 00 

To salary drawn during year $2,166 67 

$2,166 67 $2,166 67 



28 

Governor's Clerk's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $83 32 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 1,000 00 

To salary drawn during year $1,083 32 

$1,083 32 $1,083 32 

Governor's Janitor's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $80 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 600 00 

To salary drawn during year $665 00 

To balance of appropriation undrawn 

to remain in Treasury 15 00 

$680 00 $680 00 



Adjutant General's Salary. 

By balance of last year's salary un- 
drawn $133 32 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 800 00 

To salary drawn during year $933 32 

$933 32 $933 32 

Quarter Master General's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $25 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 300 00 

To salary drawn during year $300 00 

To balance of salary undrawn at 

close of year 25 00 

$325 00 $325 00 



29 

Governor's Civil Contingent Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $5,000 00 

To amount expended $281 05 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended 4,718 95 

f5,000 00 $5,000 00 



Governor's Military Contingent Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $5,000 00 

To amount expended $3,186 45 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended 1,813 55 

$5,000 00 $5,000 00 



Governor's Office Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $500 00 

To amount expended 247 26 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended 252 74 

$500 00 $500 00 



SECKETARY OF STATERS OFFICE. 

Secretary's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $166 66 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 

• tober 31, 1878 2,000 00 

To salary drawn $2,000 00 

To balance of salary undrawn 166 QQ 



,166 66 $2,166 6Q 



I 
30 

Secretary's Deputy's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $138 86 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 1,500 00 

To salary drawn during year $1,500 00 

To balance of salary undrawn 138 86 

$1,638 86 $1,638 86 

Secretary's Clerk's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $69 47 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 1,000 00 

To salary drawn during year $1,000 00 

To balance of appropriation at close 

of year 69 47 

. $1,069 47 $1,069 47 

Clerk of Printing Bureau, Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $75 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 900 00 

To salary drawn during year $900 00 

To balance of appropriation undrawn 75 00 

$975 00 $975 00 

Distribution of Laivs. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878.. $900 00 

To amount expended during year $900 00 

$900 00 $900 00 



31 
Secretary's Office Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $500 00 

To amount expended $500 00 

$500 00 $500 00 

AUDITOR OF STATE'S OFFICE. 
Auditor's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $208 66 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 2,500 00 

To salary drawn during year $2,500 00 

To balance of appropriation at close 

of year undrawn 208 66 

$2,708 66 $2,708 66 

Auditor's Deputy and Clash's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $258 66 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878../. 3,000 00 

To salary drawn during year $3,000 00 

To balance of salary undrawn at close 

of year 258 66 



$3,258 66 |3,258 66 

Auditor's Insurance and Land Clerk's Salaries. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $250 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 3,000 00 

To salaries drawn during year $3,000 00 

To balance of appropriation undrawn 

at close of year 250 00 



$3,250 00 $3,250 00 



32 

Salaries — Janitors of State Building. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $1,500 00 

To Salaries drawn during year $1,500 00 



$1,500 00 $1,500 00 



Fuel, IAght and Water for State Offices. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $5,000 00 

To amount expended during year.... $1,399 56 
To balance appropriation unexpended 3,600 44 



),000 00 $5,000 00 



- Auditor's Office Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending^Oc- 

tober31, 1878 $1,000 00t< 

1877. 

Nov. 13, for Daily Evening News... $1 20 

Dec. 7, for Postage 150 00 

1878. 

Jan. 9, for Daily Journal 6 00 

Jan. 9, for Daily Enquirer 5 50 

Jan. 9, for Postage and Express- 
age 190 00 

Jan. 9, for washing towels in Aud- 
itor's office for year 12 50 

Feb. 6, for expressage 8 15 

Feb. 6, for Daily Sentinel 5 00 

Feb. 6, for traveling expensesj to 
Ft. Wayne for State 
maps 10 60 

Feb. 6, for drayage on Land De- 
partment Records from 
old bank building to 
State Auditor's office... 1 00 



33 

April 24, for postage $100 00 

May 15, for Daily Evening N«ws... 5 00 

May 29, for postage 75 00 

June 6, for pen and holder for office 4 25 

July 8, for postage 150 00 

July 10, for Daily Journal 6 00 

July 26, for Daily Enquirer 6 50 

Aug. 9, for postage 100 00 

Aug. 15, for extra clerical work in 

Auditor's office 20 00 

Sept. 14, for extra clerical work and 
amount paid for prepar- 
ing statistical matter for 

annual report 60 00 

Oct. 11, for postage and expressage. 83 30 

$1,000 00 . $1,000 00 

TREASUEEE OF STATE'S OFFICE. 

Treasurer's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $250 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- • 

tober 31, 1878 3,000 00 

To salary drawn during year $3,000 00 

To balance of salary undrawn at close 

of year 250 00 

$3,250 00 $3,250 00 

Treasurer's Clerks' Salaries. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $166 66 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 2,000 00 

To salaries drawn during year $2,000 00 

To balance of salaries undrawn at 

close of year 166 66 

$2,166 QQ $2,166 6Q 

3 Aud. Rep. 



34 

Treasurer's Watchman's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $60 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 725 00 

To salary drawn during year $725 00 

To balance of salary undrawn at close 

of year 60 00 



$785 00 $785 00 



Treasurer's Office Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $500 00 

To amount expended during year $497 96 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended • 2 04 



$500 00 $500 00 



attoeney-geneeal's office. 

Attorney- General's Salary. 

By balance of last year's salary un- 
drawn $250 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 3,000 00 

To salary drawn during year $3,000 00 

To balance of salary undrawn at close 

of year 250 00 

$3,250 00 $3,250 00 



35 

Attorney- General's Clerk's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $125 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 1,500 00 

To salary drawn during year $1,500 00 

To balance of salary undrawn at close 

of year 125 00 

$1,625 00 $1,625 00 

Attorney- General's Office Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 * $500 00 

To amount expended during year $500 00 

$500 00 $500 00 

supekintendent's office. 

Superintendent's Salary. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $198 33 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 2,500 00 

To salary drawn during year $2,500 00 

To balance of salary undrawn at close 

of year 198 33 

$2,698 33 $2,698 33 

Superintendent's Clerks' Salaries. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $150 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 1,800 00 

To salaries drawn during year $1,800 00 

To balance of salaries undrawn at 

close of year 150 00 

$1,950 00 $1,950 00 



36 

Superintendent's Rent and Janitor. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $80 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 1,000 00 

To amount of appropriation drawn 

during year $1,000 00 

To balance of appropriation undrawn 

at close of year 80 00 

$1,080 00 $1,080 00 

Superintendent's Traveling Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $1,000 00 

To amount of appropriation drawn 

during year $1,000 00 

$1,000 00 $1,000 00 



STATE LIBRARIAN'S OFFICE. 

Librarian's Salary. 

By balance of last year's salary un- 
drawn $100 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 1,200 00 

To salary drawn during year $1/200 00 

To balance of salary undrawn at close 

of year 100 00 

$1,300 00 $1,300 00 

Librarian's Assistant's Salary. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $750 00 

To salary drawn during year $750 00 

$750 00 $750 00 



37 

Janitor and Watchman at State Library. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $1,200 00 

To salaries drawn during year $1,200 00 

$1,200 00 $1,200 00 

Books and Binding, State Library. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $1,000 00 

To amount of appropriation expended 

during year $969 97 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended at close of year 30 03 

$1,000 00 $1,000 00 

Fuel, Lights and Water for State Library. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $1,000 00 

To amount of appropriation expended 

during year $342 20 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended at close of year 657 80 

* ______________ ____________ 

$1,000 00 $1,000 00 

Incidental Expenses of State Librarian. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $500 00 

To amount of appropriation expended 

during year $169 35 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended at close of year 330 65 

$500 00 $500 00 



38 

JUDICIARY. 
Salaries of Supreme Judges. 

By balance of last year's salaries un- 
drawn $1,666 66 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 20,000 00 

To salaries drawn during year $20,000 00 

To balance of salaries undrawn at 

close of year 1,666 66 

$21,666 66 $21,666 66 

Salary, Law Librarian? 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $1,200 09 

To salary drawn during year $1,200 00 

$1,200 00 $1,200 00 

Salary, Sheriff Supreme Court. 

By balance of last year's salary un- 
drawn $100 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 200 00 

To salary drawn during year $224 05 

To balance salary undrawn at close 

of year 75 95 

$300 00 $300 00 

Salary, Janitor Supreme Court. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $720 00 

To salary drawn during year $720 00 

$720 00 $720 00 



39 

Office Expenses, Supreme Court. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 82,500 00 

To amount of appropriation expended 

during year $1,576 17 

To balance unexpended at close of 

year 923 83 

$2,500 00 $2,500 00 



Supreme Court Reports. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion unexpended $227 75 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878, as allowed in Ap- 
propriation Act of 1877 5,000 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878, as allowed in Ap- 
propriation Act approved March 
12, 1877 274 25 

To amount drawn during year $5,502 00 

$5,502 00 $5,502 00 



Circuit Judges' Salaries. 

By balance of last year's salaries un- 
drawn $13,791 77 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 107,500 00 

To salaries drawn during year $105,458 43 

To balance of salaries undrawn at 

close of year 15,833 34 

$121,291 77 $121,291 77 



40 

Special Service of Judges. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion unexpended $2 16 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 5,000 00 

To amount drawn during year $5,002 16 

$5,002 16 $5,002 16 

Superior Court Judges' Salaries. 

By balance of last year's salaries un- 
drawn $2,036 25 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 8,000 00 

To salaries drawn during year $9,035 25 

To balance of salaries undrawn at 

close of year 1,001 00 

$10,036 25 $10,036 25 

Prosecuting Attorneys' Salaries. 

By balance of last year's salaries un- 
drawn $2,562 54 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878..., 21,500 00 

To salaries drawn during year $20,361 80 

To balance of salaries undrawn at 

close of year 3,700 74 

$24,062 54 $24,062 54 

Sheriffs' Mileage. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $20,000 00 

To amount drawn during year $19,374 02 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended at close of year 625 98 

$20,000 00 $20,000 00 



41 

STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

By appropriation for salary of State 
Geologist for year ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1878 $3,000 00 

By appropriation for expenses of Geo- 
logical Survey, for year ending 
October 31, 1878 3,000 00 

By appropriation for expenses of 
State Fair for year ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1878 1,500 00 

By appropriation to pay old debt 10,000 00 

To amount drawn during year $17,500 00 

$17,500 00 $17,500 00 

STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $300 00 

To amount drawn during year $300 00 

$300 00 $300 00 

STATE BOARD OP EDUCATION. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $1,500 00 

To amount drawn during year $969 71 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended at close of year 530 29 

$1,500 00 $1,500 00 

STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $1,000 00 

To amount expended during year $806 80 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended at close of year 193 20 

$1,000 00 $1,000 00 



42 

BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 

Insane Hospital, Maintenance and Repairs. 

By appropriation for maintenance for 

year ending Oct. 31, 1878 $120,000 00 

By appropriation for repairs for year 

ending Oct. 31, 1878 10,000 00 

By cash collections from counties for 

clothing 15,715 30 

To amount of last year's appropria- 
tion overdrawn for maintenance $765 76 

To amount expended for mainten- 
ance during year ending Oct. 31, 
1878 122,412 48 

To amount expended for repairs du- 
ring year ending Oct, 31, 1878.. 9,717 19 

To balance of credits unexpended ... 12,819 87 

$145,715 30 $145,715 30 

Female Insane Hospital, New Building. 

By balance of former appropriations 

undrawn $213,126 30 

To amount expended during year $180,801 62 

To balance of appropriations unex- 
pended at close of year 32,324 68 

$213,126 30 $213,126 30 

: « /or., : 

Deaf and Dumb Institution, Current Expenses. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $109 30 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 58,000 00 

By cash collections from counties for 

clothing 5,085 42 

To amount expended during year $62,997 99 

To balance of credits unexpended.... 196 73 

194 72 $63,194 72 



43 

Blind Asylum — Current Expenses. 

By cash to correct error of warrant 

in year 1877 8100 00 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn 667 05 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 30,000 00 

By cash collections from counties for 

clothing 946 65 

To amount expended during year.... $31,378 25 

To balance unexpended at close of 

year 335 41 

$31,713 66 $31,713 66 

Soldiers' Orphans' Home — Current Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $34,000 00 

To amount expended during year.... $34,000 00 

$34,000 00 $34,000 00 



PENAL AND REFORMATORY INSTITUTIONS. 

State Prison North — Current Expenses. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn » $6,241 15 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 80,000 00 

To amount of expenditures reported 

during year $75,276 13 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended at close of year 10,965 02 



,241 15 $86,241 15 



44 

State Prison North — Deputy Warden and Chaplain, Extra Pay. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 

tianundrawn $33 33 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 400 00 

To amount drawn during year $400 00 

To balance of appropriation undrawn 

at close of year 33 33 

$433 33 1433 33 



State Prison North — New Cell-House. 

By balance of former appropriation 

unexpended $42,174 90 

To amount expended during year for 

completion of building $20,920 99 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended 21,253 91 

$42,174 90 $42,174 90 

State Prison South — Current Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $70,000 00 

To amount expended during year ... • $67,588 57 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended at close of year 2,411 43 

$70,000 00 $70,000 00 

State Prison South — Deputy Warden and Chaplain, Extra Pay. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $33 33 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 400 00 

To amount drawn during year $400 00 

To balance of appropriation undrawn 

at close of year 33 33 

$433 33 $433 33 



\ 



45 

State Prison South — New Foundry Building. 

By balance of appropriation undrawn $8,500 00 

To amount expended duriug year $8,500 00 

$8,500 00 $8,500 00 

Souse of Refuge — Current Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $53,000 00 

To amount expended during year $43,000 00 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended .. 10,000 00 

$53,000 00 $53,000 00 

. r.-'T , ; id , .. . - , ■■■! „~ 

House of Refuge — Old Indebtedness. 

By balance held in reserve for past 

year to old debts $5,484 56 

To amount of debts paid off $2,600 00 

To balance unexpended 2,884 56 

$5,484 56 $5,484 56 



Female Prison and Reformatory Institution — Current Expenses. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $21,500 00 

To amount expended during year $21,500 00 

$21,500 00 $21,500 00 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

State University. 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 $23,000 00 

To amount drawn during year $23,000 00 

$23,000 00 $23,000 00 



46 

State Normal School. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion for salaries undrawn $68 20 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878, for current ex- 
penses 3,000 00> 

To amount drawn during year $3,068 20 

$3,068 20 $3,068 20 



Purdue University. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $430 43 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 6,500 00 

To amount drawn during year $6,930 43 



5,930 43 $6,930 43 



PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

By balance of last year's appropria- 
tion undrawn $3,817 00 

By appropriation for year ending Oc- 
tober 31, 1878 15,000 00- 

To amount expended for printing du- 
ring year $6,696 84 

To amount expended for stationery 

during year 1,332 49 

To balance of appropriation unex- 
pended 10,787 67 

$18,817 00 $18,817 00 



47 

INTEREST ON STATE DEBT. 

By Appropriation Act of 1877 $300,000 00 

To interest paid on Non-negotiable 

School Fund Bonds $234,286 99 

To interest paid on Temporary Loan 

Bonds 54,600 00 

To interest paid on War Loan Bonds 8,340 00 

To interest paid on Internal Im- 
provement Bonds 800 00 

To balance of appropriation undrawn 1,973 01 

$300,000 00 $300,000 00 



48 



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STATEMENT 

Of Unexpended Balances of Appropriations made by the Legisla- 
ture of 1877. 



On account of Governor's Office expenses $252 74 

On account of Governor's Civil contingent expenses ... 4,718 95 

On account of Governor's Military contingent expenses 1,813 55 
On account of fuel, light, and water — State Officers and 

Supreme Court 3,600 44 

On account of office expenses of Treasurer of State 2 04 

On account of books and binding — State Library 30 08 

On account of fuel, light, and water — State Library 657 80 

On account of State Librarian — Incidental expenses 330 65 

On account of office expenses Supreme Court 923 83 

On account of Sheriffs' mileage 625 95 

On account of State Board of Education 530 29 

On account of State Board of Equalization 193 20 

*On account of State Prison North 10,965 02 

*On account of State Prison South 2,411 43 

On account of House of Refuge 10,000 00 

*On account of Public Printing and Stationery 10,787 67 

On account of General Contingent Expenses 2,322 92 

Total $50,166 51 

®JSote. — In these accounts, balances unexpended of last year's appropriation are 
included in the credits given the accounts at beginning of year. 



CLASSIFICATION 

Of the Ordinary Expenses of the State Government for the fiscal 
year ending October 31, 1878. 



EXECUTIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE. 



Salaries of the State officers, assist- 
ant deputies, clerks, janitors, of- 
fice expenses, pay for fuel, light 
and water ... $56,212 11 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 

Insane Hospital, current expenses.... $132,129 67 

Deaf and Dumb Institution, current 

expenses 62,997 99 

Blind Asylum, current expenses 31,378 25 

House of Refuge, current expenses.. 43,000 00 

Female Reformatory Institution, cur- 
rent expenses 21,500 00 

Soldier's Orphan's Home, current 

expenses 34,000 00 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS. 

State Prison South, current expenses. $67,988 57 
State Prison North, current expenses. 75,676 13 



,212 11 



325,005 91 



143,664 70 



53 

JUDICIAEY. 

Salaries of Supreme Court Judges... $20,000 00 

Salaries of Circuit Judges 105,458 43 

Salaries of Superior Court Judges... 9,035 25 

Salaries of Prosecuting Attorneys ... 20,361 80 

Sheriff's mileage 19,374 02 

Special services of Judges 5,002 16 

Office expenses of Supreme Court... 1,576 17 

Salary of Sheriff Supreme Court 224 05 

Salary Janitor Supreme Court 720 00 

Supreme Court Reports 5,502 00 

Salary of Law Librarian 1,200 00 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

State University at Bloomington $ 23,000 00 

State Normal School at Terre Haute. 3,068 20 

Purdue University at Lafayette 6,930 43 

State Board of Education 969 71 



$188,453 88 



33,968 34 



AGRICULTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL SOCIETIES. 

State Board of Agriculture $7,500 00 

State Horticultural Society 300 00 



STATE PRINTING. 

Printing and Stationery $8,029 33 



7,800 00 



8,029 33 



STATE DEBT. 

Interest on non-negotiable School 

Fund Bonds $234,286 99 

Interest on Temporary Loan Bonds. 54,600 00 

Interest on War Loan Bonds 8,340 00 

Interest on Internal Improvement 

Bonds 800 00 



298,026 99 



54 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



State Board of Equalization $806 80 

General contingent expenses, repairs 

on State buildings, rents, etc 7,677 08 

$8,483 88 



Total ordinary expenditures dur- 
ing year $1,069,645 14 

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENSES. 

For labor and material, new Female 

Insane Hospital $180,801 62 

For old indebtedness of House of 

Refuge 2,600 00 

For labor and material, new Foundry 

Building State Prison South 8,500 00 

For labor and material new Cell 

House State Prison North 20,920 99 

For old indebtedness State Board of 

Agriculture 10,000 00 

For payment Internal Improvement 

Bonds, principal 1,900 00 

For payment Five Per Cent. State 

Stocks, principal 2,000 00 

For payment of Two and One-Half 

Per Cent. State Stocks, princi- 
pal 360 00 

For payment Five Per Cent. State 

Stocks, interest 8 33 

*For payment Temporary Loan of 

1875 (by renewal) 200,000 00 

For payment of Revenue of 1877, 

overpayments refunded 592 19 

For payment Insurance Tax 1878, 

overpayment refunded 27 93 

'Total extraordinary expendi- 
tures during year 427,711 06 



55 

Total amount of warrants drawn 

on General Fund during 

year $1,497,356 20 

Deduct amount of Temporary Loan 

paidbyrenewal 200,000 00 

Leaves net amount for conducting the 

State government during year... $1,297,356 20 



MONTHLY STATEMENTS 

In Gross of Receipts into and Disbursements from the State Treas- 
ury, including Balances Brought Forward each Month 
from October 31, 1877, to October 31, 1878. 



NOVEMBER. 

Receipts. 



Balance in Treasury November 1, 

1877 $405,303 27 

Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 63,948 07 



Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $61,889 10 

Balance cash in Treasury November 

30,1877 407,362 24 



DECEMBER. 

Receipts. 

Balance in Treasury December 1, 

1877 $407,362 24 

Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 962,948 42 



251 34 



$469,251 34 



$1,370,310 66 



57 

Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $88,167 11 

Balance cash in Treasury December 

31,1877 1,282,143 55 

$1,370,310 66 

JANUARY. 

Receipts. 

Balance in Treasury January 1, 1878.$1,282,143 55 
Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 286,644 12 

$1,568,787 67 

Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $983,835 27 

Balance cash in Treasury January 

31,1878 584,952 40 

$1,568,787 67 

FEBRUARY. 

Receipts. 

Balance in Treasury February 1, 

1878 $584,952 40 

Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 25,571 86 

$610,524 26 

Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $110,616 84 

Balance cash in Treasury February 

28,1878 499,907 42 

$610,524 26 



58 

MARCH. 

Receipts. 

Balance cash in Treasury March 1, 

1878 $499,907 42 

Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 29,637 33 

Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $84,506 22 

Balance cash in Treasury March 31, 

1878 445,038 53 

APRIL. 

Receipts. 

Balance cash in Treasury April 1, 

1878 $445,038 53 

Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 496,619 04 

Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $421,841 00 

Balance cash in Treasury April 30, 

1878 519,816 57 

MAY. 

Receipts. 

Balance cash in Treasury May 1, 

1878 $519,816 57 

Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 1,211,801 73 



,544 75 



$529,544 75 



$941,657 57 



$941,657 57 



L,731,618 30. 



59 

Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $690,128 31 

Balance cash in Treasury May 31, 

1878 1,041,489 99 

$1,731,618. 30 

JUNE. 

Receipts. 

Balance cash in Treasury June 1, 

1878 $1,041,489 99 

Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 187,283 21 

$1,228,773 20 

Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $437,815 93 

Balance cash in Treasury June 30, 

1878 790,957 27 

$1,228,773 20 

JULY. 

Receipts. 

Balance cash in Treasury July 1, 

1878 $790,957 27 

Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 67,781 08 

$858,738 35 

Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $145,085 97 

Balance cash in Treasury July 31, 

1878 1 713,652 38 

— $858,738 35 



60 
AUGUST. 

Receipts. 

Balance cash in Treasury August 1, 

1878 $713,652 38 

Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 18,458 69 



Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $71,237 00 

Balance cash in Treasury August 31, 

1878 660,874 07 



SEPTEMBER. 

Receipts. 

Balance cash in Treasury September 

1,1878 $660,874 07 

Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 12,217 56 



Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $72,001 00 

Balance cash in Treasury September 

30,1878 601,090 63 



$732,111 07 



$,732,111 07 



$673,091 63 



$673 091 63 



61 
OCTOBER. 

Receipts. 

Balance cash in Treasury October 1, 

1878 $601,090 63 

Amount of Treasurer's receipts filed 

during month 195,470 87 

$796,561 60 

Disbursements. 

Amount of warrants issued during 

month $272,205 04 

Balance cash in Treasury October 31, 

1878 524,356 46 

>,561 50 



THE STATE OEBT. 



The condition of the Public Debt of the State at the date of this 
report, October 31, 1878, is as follows: 

FOREIGN DEBT. 

Five per cent. Certificates, State Stock $14,469 99 

Two and one-half per cent. Certifi- 
cates State Stock 2,925 13 

War Loan Bonds, six per cent 139,000 00 

Temporary Loan Bonds, six per cent., 

due April 1, 1879 510,000 00 

Temporary Loan Bonds, registered 

six per cent., due -December 1, 1879 200,000 00 

Temporary Loan Bonds, held by 
Purdue University, five per cent., 
due April 1, 1881 200,000 00 

Internal Improvement Bonds 27,000 00 

Total $1,093,395 12 

DOMESTIC DEBT. 

School Fund Bond No. 1, January 1, 

1867 $709,024 85 

School Fund Bond No. 2, January 

20,1867 2,658,057 30 

School Fund Bond No. 3, May 1, 

1, 1868 184,234 00 

School Fund Bond No. 4, January 

20, 1871..... 177,700 00 

School Fund Bond No. 5, May 3, 

1873 175,767 07 

Total . # . 3,904,783 22 

Total debt $4,998,178 34 



63 



LIST OF BORROWERS FROM THE COLLEGE FUND. 



NAMES OF BORROWERS. 



Arbuclde, Matthew 

Bailey, Mary M 

Bailey, Lewis 

Barlow, Theophilus H 

Barth, Sebastain 

Ball, Abner 

Blanch, Willis 

Boles, John 

Bowen, Peter 

Brown, Ebenezer 

Brown, Wm.'J 

Brown, Margaret 

Brown, Edgar A 

Brown, Edgar A 

Brown, C.J 

Bradley, William B.... 

Barbour, Harriet 

Brumfield, Wm. F 

Bruce, George 

Brunneman, Wm. M.„. 

Butt, Wm. S 

Bundy, Eliza J 

Buchanan, James M.... 

Burly, Martha 

Burnett, Jerome C 

Bolton, Mrs. N. C 

Brake, John J 

Cattersun, Robert F 

Catterson, Mrs. R. F.... 

Case, L. R 

Carson, W. W 

Clark, Haymond W... . 

Clark, J. M 

Clark, Rachel K 

Cheny, James H 

Chase, Joseph W 

Chittenden, George F.. 

Carter, Leonard..... 

Cole, James W 

Cooper, John J 

Coleman, James M 

Coonfield, Isaac 

Coppersmith, Lewis F. 

Crane, Charles E 

Crum, Mehitable 

Craig, Ann E 

Crimmons, Patrick 

Daniel, Sarah A 

Darling, Justin 

Decker, Christian 

Delph, Mahala A 

Dilliman, Jacob 

Daugherty, Joseph F. . 

Doyle, Jordon 

Driggs, Robert B 

Elliott, C. A 



DATE. 



January 4, 1869 

April 12, 1878 

July 25, 1876 

November 29, 1852, 

July 27, 1865 

April 6, 1863 

April 2,1874 

December 16, 1868.. 
November 7, 1864.., 

Mavl3, 1850 

October 19, 1868 

February 3, 1874... 

April 22, 1878 

April 22, 1878 

June 1, 1874 

April 5, 1865 

September 24, 1877 
February 10, 1866., 
November 7, 1873.., 
December 31, 1873., 
December 18, 1852., 

March 1,1865 

December 21, 1866., 
September 3, 1869... 

May 9, 1874 

May 25, 1863 

December 10, 1874.. 

March 12, 1864 

January 14, 1871.., 

March 1, 1877 

Mav 16, 1878 

September 28, 1839, 

April 2, 1872 

September 29, 1876., 

May 9, 1843 

August 10, 1864 

August 9, 1869 

March 24, 1865 

September 16, 1876, 

May 21, 1878 

September 3, 1875... 
December 11, 1865., 
February 13, 1847.. 
December 21, 1875.. 
Januarv 15, 1867... 

June 18, 1875 

November 10, 1878. 
December 15, 1868.. 
December 1, 1862... 

June 25, 1861 

December 16, 1873.. 

April 30, 1864 

May 14,1873 

September 23, 1876 
November 16, 1875 
March 15, 1877 



64 



LIST OF BOEKOWERS FROM THE COLLEGE FUND.— Continued. 



NAMES OF BORROWERS. 



DATE. 



Elkins, Henry 

Elkins, Joseph 

Ellis, E. W. H 

Elliott, Harriet A 

Elliott Thomas M 

Egbert, George W 

Egbert, Israel 

Estepp, James 

Farmer, Geo. G. and Downie C. L 

Findley, Thomas D 

Fisher, George 

Farry, Silas H 

Fletcher, Henry F 

Fordyce, William B 

Flaig, Matthew V 

Francis, Harry H 

Franks, Mary 

Foulks, Hiram A 

Freeland, John T 

Freeland, Robert , 

French, Harriet 

Frank, Julia M 

French, John 

Gilkey, O. B 

Gilmore, Joseph 

Girt, Nancy 

Goar, Joseph 

Gooding, Oliver P 

Green, Sarah 

Greer, Lyman M 

Gregory. W. L 

Hart, Jacob H 

Harper, Peter F 

Haskitt, Addison 

Hawkins, Jesse F 

Hamrick, Ambrose D 

Hyde, Margaret J 

Karman, John M 

Hayden, J. J 

Hayes, B. S 

Henderson, Samuel 

Hester, James S 

Holmes, Josephus 

Holmes, Henry 

Hunt, Bazel 

Hummel, Jacob 

Hunt, John A 

Hunt, Erastus F 

Huffman, Peter 

Hayes, Eugenia 

Irvin, Newton 

Jennings, Williams 

Johnston, William 

Jones, Nancy 

Jones, Dan R 

Jones, Henry C 



February 15, 1865.. 
February 15, 1865.. 

August 29, 1853 

March 22, 1869 

December 15, 1870.. 

Mav 24, 1876 

January 24, 1878... 

April 17,1873 

March 16, 1876 

January 9, 1864 

October 2, 1874 

September 23, 1869. 
February 13, 1865.. 

March 21, 1866 

August 23, 1877 

November 4, 1875... 

April 6, 1876 

August 25, 1876 

April 7, 1855 

April 7, 1855 

July 23, 1878 

January 31, 1877... 

July 20, 1874 

December 28, 1864.. 
December 22, 1865.. 

June 1, 1877 

February 14, 1851... 
December 14, 1870.. 
December 14, 1870.. 

March 15,1867 

November 26, 1875. 
November 27, 1875. 
February 29, 1876.. 
February 8, 1876.., 

March 2, 1876 

January 14, 1874... 

January 9, 1878 

March 8,1866 

June 15, 1865 

July 10, 1867 

November 22, 1842, 

July 25, 1871 

November 8, 1862.., 

July 1, 1872 

December 20, 1851., 
February 23, 1S52., 
December 1, 1863.., 
November 3, 1870., 
December 20, 1869., 
January 2, 1878...., 
September 18, 1872 

March 29,1866 

March 10,1862 

August 24, 1877...., 
December 27, 1873. 
September 3, 1875.., 



65 



LIST OF BOEEOWEES FEOM THE COLLEGE FUND.— Continued. 



NAMES OF BORROWERS. 



Jones, John D 

Keeley, Oliver S 

Kattenhorn, Laura 

Keiper, George H 

Kimball, James N , 

Kirkpatrick, Thomas N 

Kirby, George W 

Kirk, William 

Koppe, Edward 

Lamb, Samuel 

Lang, Fred , 

Leeds, J. M 

Leary, Levi 

Lefler, John 

Luark, Elizabeth 

Lingenfelter, Wm. L , 

Lake, Thomas 

McCaslin, George 

McCormick, John P , 

McClain, Thomas D 

McDonald, E. A 

McFadden, James B 

McGinnis, George F (guardian) 

McCormack, Eebecca 

Mankedick, Henry 

Mallon, Mary A 

Mavity, W. K 

May, Allen 

Meek, Jeremiah V 

Maloney, Hannah 

Milness, George A 

Millner, John .', 

Miles, Lucinda 

Merryman, Nancy E , 

Mettler, Theresa 

Messick, Margaret 

Messick, George 

Monaghan, P. T 

Moore, Euhama , 

Moore, Julia M , 

Moore, Julia M , 

Moody, William 

Morgan, James 

Morrison, Clara 

Mullen, Isaac 

Myerly, George 

Miles, Thomas 

Miller, Vincent G 

Moss, Mary E 

Mauzy, James F 

Mason, James L 

Mason, James L 

Naltner, Edward 

Nieman, Fred 

Newman, Harmon 

Norvell, Thomas J 

5 Aud. Eep. 



DATE. 



September 17, 1864. 

January 6, 1863 , 

March 27, 1865 

November 1, 1876.. 
January 12, 1874... 
December 27, 1865.. 
February 26, 1853.. 

April 27,1877 

January 8, 1875 , 

June 9, 1866 , 

December 20, 1870.. 

April 29, 1868 

December 5, 1863..., 
October 15, 1853...., 
September 13, 1864. 
February 24, 1864.. 

October 26, 1875 

February 5, 1845..., 
January 20, 1854..., 

March 2, 1836 

June 26, 1878 

April 10, 1866 

December 10,1874.. 

January 9, 1878 

January 29, 1868..., 

April 12, 1866 

December 3, 1874... 
September 9, 1852... 
September 6, 1871... 

August 1, 1871 

December 16, 1858.. 

August 15, 1860 

March 18, 1875 

December 28, 1866.. 
January 20, 1877..., 

April 24, 1875 

March 8, 1878 

Julvl2, 1877 

January 12, 1871.... 
September 16, 1876. 
September 16, 1876. 
January 22, 1863..., 
January 20, 1871..., 

May 27, 1874 

December 29, 1875.. 

June 25, 1857 

December 8, 1875... 

Januarv 5, 1876 

August" 10, 1876 

September 4, 1876... 
September 15, 1876. 

April 22, 1878 

March 17, 1877 

March 5, 1878 

November 12, 1864. 
July 23, 1845 



Amount of 
Loan. 



500 00 
187 50 
400 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
250 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
300 00 
300 00 
500 00 
400 00 
500 00 
400 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
400 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
330 00 
100 00 
500 00 
250 00 
100 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
250 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
400 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
250 00 
500 00 
500 00 
100 00 



66 



LIST OF BORROWERS FROM THE COLLEGE FUND— Continued. 



NAMES OF BORROWERS. 



Ncrvell, Thomas J 

Ott, John 

O'Harrow, Henrv 

Palmer, T. J...." 

Palmer, John J 

Parker, Wilson 

Parker, Ellen 

Peters, John C 

Perry, Nathan and Thompson, Wm. 

Pearce, William 

Perrott, Sarah 

Porter, Martha V 

Popp, Wolfgang 

Poyner, Joseph 

Piercy, John H 

Pilkington, John F 

Powers, David J 

Price, Charles A 

Ray, Polly 

Ray, James M 

Rains, Joab F 

Reading, T. C 

Reading, William V 

Redforen, Johanna 

Renihan, Mary 

Reynolds, Harris 

Reynolds, Clinton 

Riley, B. F 

Richmond, N. P 

Ristine, Joseph 

Ritter, James 

Robinson, Wm. J. H 

Rubush, Jacob ,. 

Rubush, Fletcher 

Russell, Thomas G 

Ryan, John W 

Sage, Charles 

Spencer, Clinton E 

Shuler, David 

Smith, Zadock 

Smith, Eli 

Smith, John J 

SmocU, Harvey 

Stuck, William 

Stokely, Benjamin 

Stivers, Matilda A 

Sluss, David E., Sandy, Philip M 

Tarkincton, Simpson 

Thalman, E. O 

Thompson, John W 

Thompson, James M 

Thompson, Samuel L 

Tliornbury, John 

Trissal, Francis M 

Trissal, Francis M 

Turner, Jacob 



DATE. 



March 24, 1865 

November 16, 1870.. 

July 10,. 1878 

May 24,1859 

December 20, 1873.. 

January 8, 1853 

March 31, 1863 

May 8, 1877 

January 1, 1864 

December 24, 1863... 
November 27, 1871. 
February 13, 1877... 
February 19, 1874.., 
February 20, 1839... 
November 27, 1875.. 
February 29, 1876... 

July 28, 1876 

November 21, 1877.. 

May 24, 1876 

August 20, 1866 

July 31, 1876 

March 18. 1875 

April 20,1875 

June 12, 1874 

April 14, 1875 

March 6, 1855 

March 6, 1855 

February 15, 1875... 
September 7, 1868.... 
January 24, 1865.... 
February 3, 1843 .... 
January 14, 1854.... 

March 9,1865 

November 20, 1865 . 
November 18, 1874.. 
December 14, 1871... 

July 30, 1866 

May 29, 1878 

May 21, 1863 

Januarv 26, 1835.... 
December 31,1851... 

August 10, 1868 

June 20, 1874 

September 7, 1867... 

June 11, 1874 

January 18, 1870.... 

April 3, 1876 

June 25, 1S74 

March 16,1877 

March 8,1864 

January 13, 1864.... 

January 7, 1874 

December 22, 1865... 

March 9,1875 :. 

May 28, 1875 

February 9,1866 



67 



LIST OF BORROWERS FROM THE COLLEGE FUND— Continued. 



No. of 
Loan. 



930 

1049 

1067 

1071 

1072 

761 

656 

859 

981 

1023 

1041 

1035 

991 

952 

1110 

797 

955 

751 

718 

926 

1058 

861 

986 

1115 

1089 

1116 

996 

999 

909 

921 

1038 



NAMES OF BORROWERS. 



Trucksess, Lncinda 

Tibbits, Janies I 

Tibbits, John C 

Thompkins, J. H. F... 

Thomas, James W 

Vail, John B 

Vail, Sarah A 

VanSyoc, John W 

Veatch, Cynthia E 

Veatch, John S 

Walsh, James J 

Wagamon, Joshua 

Ward & Graham 

Westlake, Thomas 

Whitman, Quincey A. 

White, W. H 

White, Frank 

Williams, John S 

Williams, John S 

Wilson, Mary A 

Winter, Frederick W. 

Witt, Lucy C 

Wood, Thomas J 

Wood, Thomas J 

Walsh, Ellen 

Wallace, Wm. H 

Wright, G.S 

Wright, Jacob T 

Wylie, Theophilus A» 

Young, John 

Yeoman, John 



Total 



DATE. 



April 10, 1868 

November 15, 1875. 

May 8, 1876 

June 17, 1876 

July 21, 1876 

December 15, 1866.. 
February 4, 1875.... 

April 5, 1865 

November 1, 1871... 

August 14, 1874 

July 14, 1875 

April 16,1875 

July 28, 1873 

November 15, 1869. 

June 15, 1878 

October 2, 1866 

December 22, 1869.. 

July 8, 1859 

December 10, 1874.. 
November 22, 1867. 

January 7, 1876 

April 22, 1865 

June 13,1872 

August 7, 1878 

April 27, 1877 

August 16, 1878 

November 4, 1873.... 
November 24, 1873. 
September 10, 1866. 

June 4,1867 

May 19, 1875 



Amount of 
Loan. 



500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
600 00 
674 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
250 00 
400 00 
390 97 
500 00 
200 00 
400 00 
500 00 
500 00 
1,256 78 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
250 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
400 00 
500 00 
655 23 

$110,725 05 



STATE ENUMERATION 



LEGISLATIVE PURPOSES 



Tabular Statement showing the number of White and Col- 
ored Male Inhabitants over the age of twenty-one years in the State 
of Indiana, by Townships and Counties, in the year 1877, as certi- 
fied to the Auditor of State by the County Auditors, to be placed 
by him before the Legislature as the official basis of the voting 
population of the State for Legislative and Congressional Appor- 
tionment of 1879, as provided for by the Constitution and Laws of 
the State : 

ADAMS COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 





03 










C3 






ng 


B45 








s § 




H 








S2 


I s 


a 


£3 


©J 


~.& 


. a 


. a 


2 Ja 


OM 


OM 




fc 


H 


H 



Union 

Root 

Preble 

Kirtland 

Washington 

St. Mary's 

Blue Creek 

Monroe 

French 

Hartford 

Wabash 

Jefferson 

Total in county 



209 




209 
289 
211 
169 
720 
197 
212 
274 
199 
236 
406 
140 


289 
211 
169 
719 
197 
212 
274 
199 
236 
406 
140 








1 
















3,261 


1 





H 



3,262 



69 



ALLEN COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


II 

. a 


O.tS 

§| 
.a 


1 

a 


H 

a 

■ 


_a 

h 
O 

,a 

a . 
Si 

ft a 

— s 
< 

i 6 




6,337 
493 
452 
361 
326 
326 
440 
330 
131 
337 
304 
375 
305 
348 
619 
254 
396 
127 
336 
90 


31 


6,368 
493 
452 
361 
327 
326 
440 
330 
131 
337 
304 
375 
305 
348 
619 
254 
396 
127 
336 
90 






















1 












































Eel .River , 
























































12, 687 


32 




12,719 





BARTHOLOMEW COUNTY. 





621 

344 
317 

198 
217 
252 
205 
1,545 
254 
284 
386 
486 
186 
161 


1 


622 

344 
325 
200 
217 
252 
205 
1,546 
254 
284 
386 
486 
186 
161 




Flat Bock 






8 
2 












Cliftv 






Clay 








1 


























Ohio 




















5,456 


12 




5,468 





BENTON COUNTY. 





115 
140 
362 
254 
181 
466 
280 
206 
244 
266 
153 




115 
140 
364 
254 
181 
466 
280 
206 
244 
266 
153 




Pine 








2 








York 
























Richland 












Hickory Grove 












Total in county 


2,667 


2 




2,669 





70 



BLACKFORD COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


e "5 


^ a 


a 

■3.S 1 

.p'S 
H 


a 

o 

a 

fit 

I 6 




656 
312 
451 
386 


2 


658 
312 
451 
386 




























1,805 


2 




1,807 





BOONE COUNTY. 



Marion 

Clinton 

Washington 

Sugar Creek 

Jefferson 

Center 

Union 

Eagle 

Perry 

Harrison 

Jackson 

Worth 

Total in county 



5,992 



495 


2 


497 


329 




329 


329 


1 


330 


717 


24 


741 


483 


1 


484 


1,205 


14 


1,219 


251 


1 


252 


518 


5 


523 


298 




298 


306 




306 


715 


2 


717 


345 


3 


348 



BROWN COUNTY. 





421 
443 
515 
462 
154 




421 
444 
515 
462 
154 






1 ' 




VanBuren 




















1,995 


1 




1,99* 







CARROLL COUNTY. 



Jackson 

Madison 

Deer Creek 

Tippecanoe 

Jefferson 

Adams 

Rock Creek 

Washington 

Carrollton 

Burlington 

Monroe 

Democrat 

Clay 

Total in county 



356 
210 
870 
276 
280 
238 
370 
278 
268 
330 
294 
309 
232 



4,311 



356 
210 
877 
276 
280 
238 
370 
278 
268 
330 
294 
309 
232 



71 



CASS COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


"3 

so 
MS 


q g 
°."B 


o 
H 


a 

M 

u 

a 

31 

£ 6 




369 

295 
284 
283 
217 
190 
196 
230 
3,056 
275 
312 
543 
370 
389 




369 
295 
284 
283 
217 
190 
196 
230 
3,100 
276 
312 
543 
374 
389 










Bethlehem 












Noble 






Clay 


















Eel 


44 
1 




Clinton 








Tipton 








4 
















7,009 


49 




7,058 





CLARK COUNTY. 





2,251 
346 
699 
187 
177 
316 
407 
264 
256 
306 
240 
189 


328 

54 

81 

1 


2,579 
400 
780 
188 
177 
318 
410 
265 
256 
306 
242 
203 






















2 
3 
1 












Wood 












2 
14 














5,638 


486 




6,124 





CLAY COUNTY. 





576 
245 
970 
594 
388 
i<35 
602 
461 
109 
315 
997 




576 
245 
979 
623 
388 
339 
603 
462 
109 
315 
1,076 






9 

29 




"Van Buren 














4 
1 
1 












Cass 












79 










5,592 


123 




5,715 





72 



CLINTON COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


Q 

ffl a 


o 
11 


a 

a 

■3 .2* 
H 


Total Number in 
County. 




1,042 
346 
292 
435 
237 
486 
380 
512 
480 
270 
311 
469 


9 
1 


1,051 
347 
292 
435 
237 
486 
380 
513 
480 
270 
311 
469 






























Kirklin 








1 


































5,260 


11 




5,271 





CRAWFORD COUNTY. 



Jennings 

Whisky Run 

Liberty 

Sterling 

Patoka 

Johnson 

Union 

Ohio 

Boone 

Total in county 



470 
251 
152 
347 
281 
186 
277 
246 
132 



470 
251 
152 
347 
281 
186 
277 
247 
132 



2,343 



DEARBORN COUNTY. 



Harrison , 

Logau 

Miller 

Lawrenueburg 

Centre 

Hogan 

Manchester 

York 

Kelso 

Jackson 

Sparta 

Clay 

Cedar Creek , 

Washington 

Total in county 



269 
215 
248 
1,239 
1,358 
202 
474 
250 
374 
270 
427 
361 
109 
129 

5,925 



269 
215 
248 
1,246 
1,358 
202 
477 
250 
374 
270 
428 
361 
109 
129 



73 



DAVIESS COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


£ 03 

>^= 


05 

"3 

"©■2 


a 
■s 

o 
H 

_g 
H 


a 
u 

0) 

If 

I s 




1,719 
236 
352 
289 
603 
285 
342 
240 
323 
274 


44 


1,763 
236 
352 
289 
603 
285 
342 
240 
323 
274 
































































4,663 


44 




4,707 





DECATUR COUNTY. 





1,404 
462 
156 
537 
468 
398 
523 
513 
327 


21 
1 


1,425 
463 
156 
537 
469 
398 
523 
513 
327 




Fugit 














Clay 


1 




















Salt Creek 














4,788 


23 




4,811 







DeKALB county. 



Butler .- 


204 
332 
404 
211 
150 
640 
1,144 
306 
380 
333 
313 
145 
659 




204 

332 
404 
211 
150 
640 
1,144 
306 
380 
333 
313 
145 
659 






















Stafford 
























Fairfield 






Smithfield 












Troy 




















5,221 






5,221 





74 



DELAWARE COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


9 

13 

si 

J3 


OS 


o 

□ 

ll 


a 
u 

If 




368 
433 
363 
289 
348 
1,421 
259 
296 
274 
376 
292 
293 


2 
1 


370 
434 
363 
289 
349 
1,472 
259 
296 
274 
376 
292 
293 




















1 

51 


















































5,012 


55 




5,06T 







DUBOIS COUNTY. 





167 
244 
233 
228 
392 
198 
237 
205 
239 
421 
318 
355 




167 
244 
233 
228 
392 
198 
237 
205 
239 
421 
323 
360 


































Hall 


















Patoka 








5 
5 














3,237 


10 




3,247 





ELKHART COUNTY. 



Elkhart 

Clinton 

Benton 

Jackson 

Harrison 

Concord 

Bango 

Olive 

Jefferson 

Middleburg 

York 

Washington 

Osole 

Cleveland 

Union 

Locke 

Total in county 



1,332 
467 
359 
403 
457 

2,063 
183 
289 
292 
442 
226 
343 
263 
134 
377 
285 



7,91c 



1,335 
467 
359 
403 
457 

2,070 
183 
289 
292 
443 
226 
343 
263 
134 
377 
285 



75 



FAYETTE COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


S3 




a 

c 
H 

.2 
If 


a 
as 

s 

a 

I 1 




1,125 
202 
262 
222 
223 
236 
171 
268 
166 


41 
1 


1,166 
203 
262 
222 
223 
237 
171 
268 
166 


























1 




























2,875 


43 




2,918 







FLOYD COUNTY. 



City of New Albany 

New Albany township, 

Greenville 

Georgetown 

Lafayette 

Franklin 

Total in county 



3,066 
517 
367 
324 
359 
184 



4,817 



229 


3,295 


42 


559 


2 


369 


3 


327 


3 


362 


1 


185 



5,097 



FOUNTAIN COUNTY. 



Jackson 

Mill Creek 

Fulton 

Wabash 

Cain , 

Van Buren 

Troy , 

Richland , 

Shawnee 

Logan , 

Davis 

Total in county 



321 
432 
226 
527 
438 
533 
776 
436 
281 
697 
218 



321 
432 
226 
527 
438 
533 
779 
436 
281 
704 
222 



4,89* 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 



Bath 

Springfield 

White Water 

Highland 

Brookville 

Fairfield 

Blooming Grove 

Laurel 

Metamora 

Butler 

Ray 

Salt Creek 

Posey 

Total in county 



174 
384 
321 
371 
1,134 
208 
186 
508 
262 
329 
433 
279 
220 



4,809 



174 
385 
321 
371 
1,135 
208 
186 
510 
262 
329 
433 
279 
220 



4,81S 



76 



FULTON COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


"3 

•IS i 

J3 


"3 


a 

a 


a 

h 

.8 

s 

sf 
I s 




304 

302 
189 
403 
1,065 
269 
450 
331 




304 
302 
189 
403 
1,071 
269 
450 
331 
























6 




























3,313 


6 




3,319 







GIBSON COUNTY. 



Columbia 

Patoka 

Princeton Corporation 

White River 

Washington 

Montgomery 

Johnson 

Wabash 

Barton 

Center 

Total in county ... 



672 
495 
517 
267 
725 
680 
113 
414 
324 



4,573 



368 
761 
548 
561 
267 
729 
680 
113 
415 
324 



4,776 



GRANT COUNTY. 





304 
314 
418 
245 
999 
405 
273 
390 
440 
470 
348 
240 
424 




304 
314 
418 
245 
1,044 
411 
273 
390 
450 
564 
348 
240 
458 
























45 
6 




Mm 
















10 

94 




Liberty 




Green 




Sims 






Franklin 


34 








Total in county 


5,270 


189 




5,459 







77 



GREENE COUNTY. 

























L 


^ 












H 


,S 




£ eJ 


a a 




a 


TOWNSHIPS. 




Li - 


c 


£>> 






^J3 


"S.& 


5« 
« 5 














£h 




Om 


oo 




!zi 


fc 


Eh 


Eh 




465 

346 




465 
346 












196 
459 
414 
448 
269 




196 
459 
414 
449 
270 


















i 

1 








Eel River 


83 
211 




83 
212 






1 




Smith 


176 

360 




176 

360 




Wright 








292 
245 
310 
394 
151 




292 
246 
331 
398 
151 




Stafford 


1 

21 
4 
























4,819 


29 




4,848 







HAMILTON COUNTY. 



NoWesville , 

Washington 

Clay 

Delaware 

Fall Creek 

Wayne 

White River 

Jackson 

Adams 

Total ia county 



5,404 



1,058 


76 


1,134 


862 


28 


890 


352 


2 


354 


374 


7 


381 


382 




382 


342 




342 


514 




514 


930 


39 


969 


590 


18 


608 



170 



5,574 



HANCOCK COUNTY. 



Blue River 

Brown 

Brandy wine 

Buck Creek 

Center , 

Green 

Jackson 

Sugar Creek 

Vernon 

Total in county 



301 
282 
287 
345 
1,014 
277 
459 
495 
500 



3,960 



303 
282 
287 
345 
1,025 
277 
462 
499 
500 



3,980 



78 



HARRISON COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


03 

.- ci 
,4 


I_ 03 


a 

o 
H 

# g 

"3.& 

o-S 
H 


c 
u 

M 

a 

c 

33 
S 6 




695 
413 
362 
387 
331 
332 
250 
243 
278 
235 
295 
259 
194 


36 
16 
5 


731 
429 
367 
387 
332 
333 
250 
244 
278 
240 
296 
259 
194 








Heth 










1 
1 














1 




Taylor 






5 
1 












Scott 














4,274 


66 




4,34* 







HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Center 

Washington. 

Guilford 

Liberty 

Franklin 

Clay 

Marion 

Eel Eiver .... 

Union 

Middle 

Brown 

Lincoln 



Total in county. 



744 


19 


376 


4 


534 


48 


601 


1 


326 


1 


405 


8 


314 


4 


463 


1 


300 


2 


385 




283 




373 


2 



763 
380 
582 
602 
327 
413 
318 
464 
302 
385 
283 
375 



HENRY COUNTY. 



Wayne 

Franklin 

Dudley 

Liberty 

Henry 

Greensboro 

Harrison 

Fall Creek 

Prairie 

Stoney Creek 

Spiceland 

Jefferson 

Blue River 

Total in county 



798 


25 


408 


6 


346 


5 


472 


2 


820 


47 


350 


22 


412 


13 


505 


3 


403 


1 


216 


4 


471 


25 


263 




195 


3 



823 
414 
351 
474 
867 
372 
425 
508 
404 
220 
496 
263 
198 



79 



HOWARD COUNTY. 







<v 












a 






*J 


Srf 




u 


TOWNSHIPS. 


a> a 


"1 

3« 


a 


■a 

!# 

"3 g 




£3 




•-H ft 














°H 


££ 




oo 




& 


fc 


H 


H 




1,303 
461 
274 
316 
230 
378 


44 

40 

6 

9 


1,347 
561 
280 
325 
230 
378 




Edwin 








Clay , 








Taylor 








291 
367 


2 


293 
367 










426 
223 
272 




426 
223 
279 












7 










4,541 


108 




4,649 







HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 





517 
369 
258 
338 
1,246 
306 
450 
408 
256 
238 
326 
398 




517 
369 
258 
338 

1,246 
306 
450 
408 
257 
238 

. 326 
398 
















Dallas 






























Polk 


1 




























5,050 


1 




5,051 





JACKSON COUNTY. 



1 

Driftwoed 


186 
241 
637 
223 
1,151 
400 
391 
393 
387 
339 
450 




186 
241 
637* 
223 
1,203 
400 
391 
396 
387 
339 
450 




Grassy Fork 






Browiistown 






Washington 








52 




Redding 












3 




Carr 










Salt Creek 












Total in county 


4,798 


55 




4 853 







80 



JASPER COUNTY. 







V 


















§ • 


s^ 


o 










s 


£* 


TOWNSHIPS 


SS <3 


» 2 


p 


a 




H 




"3 * 


a 

«3 




5m 


<=5 


o-g 


§<3 




fc 


fc 


H 


P 




111 




111 






152 




152 




Walker 


129 

227 

497 

147 

137 

90 

58 

55 

502 




129 

227 

497 

147 

137 

90 

53 

55 

502 








































Wheatfield . 














60 
95 




60 
95 


















2,260 






2,260 







JAY COUNTY. 





440 
186 
363 
357 
315 
290 
360 
617 
370 
293 
323 
217 


4 


444 
186 
364 
357 
315 
290 
360 
621 
370 
293 
323 
217 










1 




















Pike 








4 














Noble 




















4,131 


9 




4,140 





JEFFERSON COUNTY. 



Madison 

Milton .-. 

Shelby 

Lancaster 

Republican 

Graham 

Saluda 

Hanover 

Monroe 

Smyrna 

Total in county 



2,955 
465 
411 
309 
246 
328 
330 
221 
330 
223 



5,818 



3,086 
465 
412 
312 
246 
328 
336 
261 
330 
230 



6,006 



81 



JENNINGS COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


o a 

p 03 


"3 

o -H 


o 

a 

EH 


a 

u 
3 

.a 

a 

2« 




221 
328 
300 
487 
224 
199 
225 
388 
446 
593 
235 


18 
15 


339 

343 
300 
491 
224 
199 
225 
388 
466 
612 
235 














4 




























20 
19 




















3,646 


76 




3,722 







JOHNSON COUNTY. 



Franklin 

Ninevph 

Blue River 

Hensley 

Clark 

Pleasant 

Union ... 

White River 

Total in county 



1,410 

384 
591 
410 
354 
566 
325 
503 



4,543 



1,448 
386 
615 
410 
354 
566 
325 
604 



4, 60S 



KNOX COUNTY. 



Vigo 

Widner 

Busseron 

Washington 

Palmyra 

Vincenaes , 

Harrison 

Johnson 

Decker 

8teen 

Total in connty 



683 
380 
334 
383 
275 
1,865 
650 
382 
193 
258 



5,403 



105 



683 
383 
340 
383 
277 
1,956 
653 
382 
193 
258 



5,508 



6 Aud. Rep. 



82 



KOSCIUSKO COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 

/ 


No. White Male 
Inhabitants. 


No. Colored Male 
Inhabitants. 


a 

* 

o 

a 


a 

S3 

a 
6° 




339 
234 
600 
285 
405 
405 
355 
1,667 
246 
338 
298 
342 
427 
331 
205 
190 
245 




339 

234 
600 
285 
405 
405 
355 
1,073 
246 
338 
298 
342 
427 
331 
205 
190 
245 


































Plain 








6 




Clav 








































Scott 






Etna 














6,312 


6 




6,318 







LAGRANGE COUNTY. 





336 
281 
243 
337 
349 
321 
282 
632 
. 422 
329 
261 




336 

281 
243 
337 
349 
322 
282 
632 
422 
329 
261 










Eden 












Clav 








1 




















Milford 




















3,793 


1 1 


3,794 







LAKE COUNTY. 



North 


511 
385 
381 
597 
311 
401 
1S6 
140 
349 
225 




511 
385 
381 
597 
311 
401 
186 
140 
349 
225 






















West Creek... 






Cellar 




































Total in county 


3,436 




3,48ft 











83 



LAPORTE COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


0) 


eg 


a 

o 
H 

H 


Total Number in 
County. 




134 
272 
263 

1,416 
355 

2,063 
335 
197 
136 
136 
179 
524 
207 
296 
296 
51 
128 
300 
65 




134 
272 
266 

1,434 
355 

2,095 
340 
197 
139 
136 
179 
526 
207 
297 
298 
51 
128 
300 
65 












3 

18 














32 
5 








Wills. 






3 
















2 








Noble 


1 

2 






































7,353 


66 1 

1 


7,419 







LAWRENCE COUNTY. 



Flinn 

Pleasant Run 

Perry 

Indian Creek 

Spice Valley 

Marion 

Bono 

Sha^swiek 

Marshall 

Guthrie 

Total in county 



239 
766 
215 
366 
514 
759 
251 
832 
205 
270 



4,417 



239 
766 
216 
366 
518 
800 
251 
841 
205 
270 



4,472 



MADISON COUNTY. 



Adams 

Fall Creek 

Green 

Stoney Creek 

Jackson 

Anderson 

Union 

Richland 

Lafayette 

Pipe Creek 

Monroe 

Van Buren 

Boone 

Duck Creek 

Total in county 



371 
614 
243 

294 
273 
1,402 
205 
242 
362 
622 
628 
264 
289 
203 



6,012 



371 
615 
245 
297 
273 
1,418 
205 
242 
362 
623 
628 
264 
289 
203 



6,035 



84 



MARION COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


Vhite Mule 
bitants. 




o 
Eh 

a 


a 
8 

a 






o s 


■s.& 


■a § 




5*3 


65 


€3 


So 




1 fc 


fc 


H 


H 



Franklin 

Perry 

Pike 

Washington 

Wayne 

Warren 

Lawrence 

Decatur 

Center 

Total in county 



613 
609 
613 
621 
981 
666 
602 
406 
18, 634 



23,745 



•4 

41 

7 

19 

57 

18 

9 

2 

1,750 



1,907 



617 
650 
620 
640 
1,038 
684 
611 
408 
20,384 



25,662 



MARSHALL COUNTY. 



Union 

Center 

Greene 

Bourbon 

Tippecanoe 

German 

North 

Polk 

West 

Walnut 

Total in county 



317 
1,202 
265 
676 
307 
685 
437 
445 
375 
447 



5,156 



317 

1,205 
265 
676 
307 
685 
437 
445 
375 
447 



5,158 



MARTIN COUNTY. 



Baker 

McCameron 

Brown 

Miteheltree 

Hal bert 

Center 

Perry 

Rutherford 

Columbia 

Lost Uiver 

Total in county 



217 
242 
255 
243 
407 
279 
361 
263 
142 
239 



2,648 



217 
242 
256 
245 
410 
279 
361 
264 
146 
239 



2,656 



85 



MIAMI COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


a> "3 

.■£ 03 

!zi M 


"3 

d a 


a 

o 
H 

« & 
EH 


a 

u 

31 

S 3 




1,336 
387 
341 
263 
403 
160 
351 
330 
401 
303 
253 
269 
494 
294 


26 


1,362 
387 
342 
263 
404 
160 
352 
330 
402 
303 
255 
269 
494 
294 










1 








Richland 


1 




Erie 




Butler 


1 










1 








Clay 


2 














Allen 














■ 5,585 


32 




5,617 





MONROE COUNTY. 



Bean Blossom 

Washington 

Marion , 

Benton 

Bloomington 

Richland 

"Van Buren 

Perry 

Salt Creek 

Polk 

Clear Creek 

Indian Creek 

Total in county 



325 


1 


235 


2 


87 




174 




666 


35 


382 


18 


236 


1 


412 


12 


145 




178 




323 




232 


2 



326 
237 
87 
174 
701 
400 
237 
424 
145 
178 
323 
234 



3,466 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 





471 
414 
351 
508 
271 
2,382 
268 
332 
451 
473 
560 




471 
414 
351 

508 
271 
2,468 
268 
332 
451 
473 
560 










Ripley 












Scott 








86 








Sugar Creek 












Walnut 






Clark 












Total in county 


6,481 


86 




6,567 





86 



MORGAN COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 



5A 
o w 
H 



Washington 

Jackson 

Green 

Harrison 

Madison 

Clay 

Brown 

Monroe 

Adams 

Gregg 

Jefferson. 

Bay 

Baker 

Ashland 

Total in county 



877 
405 
287 
102 
197 
297 
429 
395 
290 
258 
237 
217 
100 
240 



4,331 



901 
405 
287 
102 
197 
297 
403 
395 
290 
258 
237 
221 
100 
240 



NEWTON COUNTY. 





211 

196 

139 

217 

291 

248 

42 

215 

35 

55 

273 

182 




211 

196 

139 

218 

293 

248 

45 

215 

35 

55 

277 

186 
















1 
2 












McClellan 


3 








Colfax 














4 
4 














2,104 


14 




2,118 







NOBLE COUNTY. 



Washington , 

Sparta 

Pnrry 

Elkhart 

York 

Noble 

Green 

Jefferson 

Orange 

Wayne 

AlU-n 

Swan 

Albion 

Total in county 



164 
380 
774 
429 
272 
292 
317 
351 
504 
839 
160 
395 
265 



5, 442 



164 
380 

775 
429 
272 
292 
317 
351 
504 
812 
460 
395 
267 



87 



OHIO COUNTY. 







"3 
Sri 




o 






TOWNSHIPS. 


it. « 


11 


H 

a 


5£ 






£■8 


°-3 


7J & 


5t 

« 5 






°3 


£* 


SS 


06 






fc 


a 


H 


H 




774 


41 


815 






125 
175 
392 


2 


127 
175 

192 








Pike 














Total in 


1,266 


43 




1,309 







ORANGE COUNTY. 



Paoli 


557 
206 
427 
194 
207 
355 
253 
276 
349 
181 


13 


570 
206 
431 
197 
208 
355 
253 
276 
349 
1S4 










4 
3 
1 












French Lick 
























3 








Total in county 


3,005 


24 




3,029 







OWEN COUNTY. 



Wayne 

Montgomery 

Washington 

Morgan 

Jackson 

Harrison 

Clay 

Franklin 

Jefferson 

Marion 

Lafayette 

Jennings 

Taylor 

Total in county 



3,456 



320 
144 
626 
201 


2 

2 

29 


165 




120 




261 




31S 




369 




385 




214 
147 
186 


1 
1 



322 
146 
655 
201 
165 
120 
261 
318 
369 
385 
215 
148 
186 



3,491 



88 



PARKE COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 




®i 

8 « 
"3-2 


a 

IS 

o 
H 

a 
Eh 


a 

at 
.a 

a 

a 

S 6 




924 
388 
214 
410 
369 
17-5 
455 
312 
325 
336 
290 
336 
144 


38 
6 


962 
394 
214 
410 
371 
176 
455 
318 
325 
337 
290 
347 
14-1 




















2 

1 








Florida 






6 










1 










11 
















4,678 


65 




4,74R 





PERRY COUNTY. 



Troy 


1,361 
341 
388 
502 
290 
353 
183 


40 


1,401 
341 
388 
505 
290 
353 
183 








Clark 






Tobin 


3 








Oil 




















3,418 


43 




3,461 







PIKE COUNTY. 





565 
645 
163 
196 
421 
466 
248 
468 
324 




565 
651 
163 
196 
421 
466 
243 
468 
324 






6 








Clay 












Monroe 












Lockhart 






Marion , 












Total in county 


3, 491 


6 




3,497 


... 





89 



PORTER COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


C3 

rCCH 


*c3 


a 

o 
H 

fl 

Ob 


a 
u 
fit 

a 

si 

s a 




1,294 
239 
168 
241 
228 
230 
413 
225 
258 
342 
150 
58 
168 




1,294 
239 
170 
241 
229 
234 
414 
225 
258 
345 
150 
58 
169 












2 










1 
4 
1 
























3 
















1 










4,014 


12 




4,026 





POSEY COUNTY. 



Black 

Lynn 

Point 

Harmony 

Bobb 

Marrs 

Kobinson 

Smith 

Bethel 

Center 

Total in county 



4,337 



,253 
358 
240 
545 
432 


147 

20 

21 

1 


1,410 
378 
261 
546 
432 


473 




473 


393 




393 


256 




256 


148 




148 


229 




229 



4,526 



PULASKI COUNTY. 





189 

147 

204 

164 

224 

296 

218 

235 

162 

, 88 

1 103 

69 

195 


1 


190 
147 
204 
164 
224 
296 
218 
235 
162 

88 
103 

69 
195 




















White Post 






























































2,294 


1 




2,295 





90 



PUTNAM COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


a 

<x. 

£ a 

it- C3 


121 


ft 


H 

•S 
H 


3 

a 
gf 

I 3 




339 
305 
322 
244 
364 
270 
353 
1,214 
236 
443 
254 
233 
408 
97 




339 
305 
323 
24^5 
365 
270 
353 
1,267 
238 
443 
253 
234 
408 
97 












1 
1 
1 












Floyd 












53 

2 














4 
1 












Mill Creek 














5,032 


63 




5,145 







RANDOLPH COUNTY. 



"White River 


1,194 
512 
482 
302 
239 
384 
243 
422 
300 
995 
394 
383 


12 

24 

47 

9 

35 
11 


1,206 
536 
529 
311 
304 
398 
243 
422 
300 

1,001 
395 
384 












Net ile Creek 












Ward , 














6 
1 
1 


















5,880 


146 




6,026 







RIPLEY COUNTY. 



Johnson 

Washington. 

Brown 

Franklin 

Shelby 

Otter Creek 

Jackson 

Adams , 

Laughery 

Delaware 

Center 

Total in county 



555 
250 
470 
433 
563 
360 
339 
565 
329 
332 
388 



557 
251 
485 
433 
570 
360 
339 
565 
329 
334 
388 



91 



BUSH COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


CD 

3 .-a 






a 
53 




419 
435 
306 
362 
406 
939 
189 
317 
285 
379 
281 
234 


70 
2 


489 
437 
306 
362 
409 
961 
190 
317 
285 
386 
285 
235 








Walker. 












3 

22 

1 
























7 
4 
1 




Noble 














4,552 


110 




4,662 







SHELBY COUNTY. 



Jackson 

Washington 

Noble 

Liberty 

Addison 

Hendricks 

Sugar Creek 

Brandy wine 

Marion 

Union 

Hanover 

Van Buren 

Moral 

Total in county 



358 
379 
421 
370 
1,312 
440 
274 
317 
219 
287 
407 
318 
417 



5,519 



360 
380 
421 
370 
1,342 
440 
274 
318 
222 
287 
407 
318 
420 



5, 559 



SCOTT COUNTY. 



Jennings 

Johnson 

Lexington 

Finley 

Vienna 

Total in county 



291 
307 
545 

258 
487 



291 
307 
545 

258 
487 



92 



SPENCER COUNTY. 





G> 


CD 


















%4 


^ • 


O 


u 






T!- 2 


H 


fi 


TOWNSHIPS. 






a 


a 
5* 




►> ]n 


73 -^ 




fc-s 




,0 


o s 


"? ** 


« S 




°8 


°5 


c-2 


gd • 




531 
1,130 
582 
317 
505 
408 
189 
444 
387 


46 

224 

24 

1 


577 
1,354 
6fll! 
318 
505 
410 
193 
452 
387 




Ohio 








Huff 










i 

4 
8 












Clay 












4,493 


309 




4,802 

















STARKE COUNTY. 



North Bend 


132 
135 
149 
73 
192 
ISO 
187 
72 
45 




132 
135 
149 

73 
193 
180 
187 

72 
45 
























1 


































1,165 


1 




1,166 

















ST. JOSEPH COUNTY. 



Olive 


426 
206 
152 
260 
129 
1,014 
2, 931 
196 
242 
479 
437 
437 
346 




426 
206 
152 
260 
129 
1,019 
2, 96S 
196 
242 
485 
437 
437 
3!0 
















Clay 














5 
37 








Center 












6 














Lincoln 














7,255 


48 




7,303 







93 



STEUBEN COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


2 
"3 

Si 

J3 
<>|S 




a 

C 

.9 
6h 


a 
u 

■S 

a 

a 

"3 3 




282 
214 
338 
106 
269 
271 
673 
297 
415 
443 
341 
178 


1 


283 
214 
340 
106 
269 
271 
676 
297 
415 
443 
341 
178 










2 








York 






Scott 








3 








































3,827 


6 




3,833 





SULLIVAN COUNTY. 





423 
503 
469 
322 
1,001 
337 
386 
723 
514 




423 

503 
469 
322 
1,009 
337 
386 
741 
520 
























8 




Cass 










18 
6 




Gill 








Total in county 


4,678 


82 




4,710 





SWITZERLAND COUNTY. 



Jefferson 

Vevay Corporation . 

York 

Posey 

Colton 

Pleasant 

Craig 

Total in county 



3,050 



440 


2 


422 


15 


374 


2 


540 


10 


364 




464 


2 


446 





442 
437 
376 
550 
364 
466 
446 



3,081 



94 



TIPPECANOE COUNTY. 

















































o 








11 

S j3 


H 


^ 




-S 9 




g 


TOWNSHIPS. 




a 










H O, 




°3 






I 3 



Lauramie 

Randolph 

Jackson 

Wayne 

Union 

Wea 

Sheffield 

Perry 

Washington 

Tippecanoe 

Wabash 

Shelby 

Fairfield 

Total in county 



553 
214 
276 
340 
209 
304 
440 
404 
396 
501 
559 
364 
4,038 



8,598 



553 
214 
276 
340 
209 
304 
440 
404 
396 
501 
559 
364 
4,118 



8,678 



TIPTON COUNTY. 





419 
936 
4S2 
449 
513 
417 


S 
8 


427 
944 
482 
449 
513 
417 
























Wildcat 














3, 216 


16 




3,232 







UNION COUNTY. 



Center 

Union 

Harmony 

Liberty 

Brownsville 

Harrison 

Total in county 



290 
202 
267 
345 
201 



597 
303 
206 
267 
346 
202 



1,921 



VANDERBURG COUNTY. 



Pigeon 

Knight 

Scott 

Armstrong 

Perry 

Union 

Center 

German 

Total in county 



8,259 



5, 739 


513 


6,252 


351 


85 


436 


394 


17 


411 


313 




313 


419 


22 


441 


257 


28 


285 


413 


25 


438 


373 


3 


37G 



8, 952 



95 



VERMILLION COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


No. White Male 
Inhabitants. 


0> 

a a 


=3 
o 

■sf 


a 




535 
310 
533 
687 
695 


i 
i 


536 
311 
533 
687 
705 












Helt 








10 










Total in 


2,760 


12 




2,772 









VIGO COUNTY. 



Harrison 

Honey Creek 

Prairieton 

Prairie Creek 

Linton 

Pierson .'. 

Eiley 

Lost Creek 

Nevins 

Otter Creek 

Fayette 

Sugar Creek 

Total in county 



8,856 



4,952 


155 


5,107 


340 


10 


350 


234 




234 


324 


3 , 


327 


391 


23 


414 


337 




337 


389 




389 


376 


49 


425 


338 


19 


357 


288 


53 


341 


457 




457 


430 




430 



WABASH COUNTY. 



Chester 

Lagro 

Liberty 

Noble 

Fie?sant 

Fawpaw 

Walte : 

City of Wabash 

Total in county 



1,038 
1,001 
503 
919 
490 
445 
569 
853 



5,818 



1,045 
1,004 
505 
928 
490 
445 
574 



WARREN COUNTY. 





352 
257 
106 
270 
271 
172 
282 
297 
195 
139 
218 
182 




352 
257 
106 
271 
272 
172 
282 
297 
195 
139 
218 
185 


















1 
1 




Pike 






































Kent 


3 










2,741 


5 




2,746 







96 



WARRICK COUNTY. 



, 


o 


o 


i 




















is 






S O! 




o 






$a 


11 


H 




TOWNSHIPS. 


S.-s 


o +$ 


a 


gj» 




fe:-° 


"o-fi 






^S 


_g 


•35, 


"3 2 




°S 


£m 


s-s 


S<3 




£ 


[z. 


H 


H 



Anderson 

Boone 

Campbell 

Greer 

Hart 

Lane 

Ohio 

Owen 

Pigeon 

Skelton 

Total in county 



190 
1,008 
345 
250 
433 
222 
727 
313 
413 
325 



4,226 



203 
1,058 
352 
252 
433 
222 
772 
314 
413 
327 



WASHINGTON COUNTY. 



Gibson 

Monroe 

Jefferson 

Brown 

Vernon 

Washington 

Franklin 

Polk 

Pierce 

Howard , 

Madison 

Posey 

Jackson 

Total in county 



343 
259 
300 
320 
214 
889 
320 
216 
247 
268 
177 
291 
170 



4,014 



343 
259 
300 
320 
214 
889 
320 
216 
247 
208 
177 
291 
170 



WAYNE COUNTY. 



Abington , 

Boston , 

Center 

Clay 

Dal ton 

Franklin 

Green 

Harrison 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

New Gordon 

Perry , 

Washington 

Wayne 

Webster 

Total in county 



8,480 



212 




212 


244 


1 


245 


622 


9 


631 


241 


12 


253 


186 


6 


192 


361 


20 


381 


306 




306 


149 




149 


1,143 


62 


1,205 


461 


6 


467 


296 


34 


330 


214 


19 


233 


518 


8 


526 


3,373 


192 


3,565 


154 


11 


165 



380 



97 



WELLS COUNTY. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


,13 




pi 
I* 
o 
H 

fl 

■s-g 

EH 


a 

H 

B 

!> 

-f o 




307 
386 
329 
320 
352 
446 
940 
422 
516 




307 

386 
329 
320 
352 
446 
940 
422 
516 




























































4,018 






4,018 





WHITE COUNTY. 





542 

182 
517 
286 
244 
409 
341 
188 
135 
217 
194 




542 
182 
517 
286 
244 
409 
341 
188 
135 
217 
194 








































West Point , 
































3,255 






3,255 







WHITLEY COUNTY. 





558 
451 
226 
107 
323 
521 
257 
354 
379 
317 
423 




558 
451 
226 
107 
323 
521 
257 
354 
379 
317 
449 










Troy 






Etna 
























Thorn Creek 


















Smith 


26 










3,916 


26 




3 942 








442, 970 


8,056 




451 026 






Total number whites 








442 970 






















Total number of white and colored 


451, 026 











7 Aud. Rep. 



Office of the Auditor of State,. 
Indianapolis, Ind., October 14, 1878. 

I, E. Henderson, Auditor of the State of Indiana, hereby certify 

that the above statement contains the true number of white and 

colored male inhabitants over the age of twenty-one years resident 

in the several townships and counties in the State of Indiana, in 

the year 1877, as certified to me by the Auditors of the several 

counties in the State. 

E. HENDERSON, 

Auditor of State. 



STATEMENT OF VALUATION 



OT 



REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY IN THE STATE 



The total valuation of Real and Personal Property in the State, 
during the last twenty-three years, together with the increase or 
decrease each year, is shown as follows : 



YEAR. 



Total. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



For the year 1856 

For the year 1857 

For the year 1858 

For the year 1859 

For the year 1860 

For the year 1861 

For the year 1862..; 

For the year 1863 

For the year 1864 

For the year 1865 

For the year 1866 

For the year 1867 

For the year 1868 

For the year 1869 

For the year 1870 

For the year 1871 

For the year 1872 

For the year 1873 

For the year 1874, estimated 

For the year 1875 

For the year 1876 

For the year 1877 

For the year 1878 



«279, 
317, 
318, 
435, 
455, 
441, 
421, 
443, 
516, 
567, 
578, 
577, 
587, 
655, 
662, 
653, 
653, 
933, 
954, 
897, 
864, 
855, 
850, 



032,209 
932, 958 
204, 964 
367, 862 
011,378 
562, 339 
406, 936 
455, 036 
805, 999 
381,553 
484,109 
869, 079 
970, 549 
521,479 
283, 178 
944, 159 
367, 451 
581,067 
857,475 
739,783 
720, 440 
190, 125 
616, 987 



838, 900, 749 

272, 006 

117,162,898 

19, 643, 516 



22, 048, 100 
73, 359, 963 
50,575,554 
11,102,556 

10,101,470 
67, 550, 930 
6, 761, 699 



280, 213, 616 
21,276,408 



$13, 499, 039 
20,155,408 



615,030 



8,839,019 
576, 708 



57,117,692 

33, 019, 343 

9, 530, 315 

4, 573, 138 



100 



ABSTRACT OF THE ASSESSMENT OF PROP 



NAME OF COUNTY. 




-a 

B 
3 


5 
a 

o 
o> 
3 

> 


a 
3 

> 
o 
u 
O. 

g 

O 
01 

> 


g 
t— i 

a 
a 8 

t? g 

O CD 

§° 
-a *h 

a P. 

> 


«js 

u a. 

CD g 

a.j~ 
£ a 
as a to 

hCo3 -" 

oj a 
t- M cu 

CJ«H d 

t> o a 
< 


T3 

a 

OS 

3 

tw -23 
o o 

o> a 

g a 




212.113 


z 


$2,187,290 
8,449,195 
5,754,720 
4,044,S67 
1,198,674 
6,529,365 

831,194 
4,153,800 
4,110,705 
3,532,088 
3,854,160 
4,373,430 

609,130 
3,279,000 
3,394,050 
5,865,500 
3,674,142 
5,364,080 
1,572,060 
8,026,491 
4,150,4S0 
1, 276, 961 
5,725,035 
3, 988, 720 
2, 594, 500 
4,605,265 
4,894,970 
3, 358, 466 
7, 322, 145 
1,938,370 
2,275,330 
8,159,227 

366,090 
3,016,305 
3,571,260 
3,670,140 
2,132,604 

263, 249 
2,587,250 
1,6S6,696 
6,351,820 
4,125,340 
5,361,470 
3,935,025 
3, 826, 455 
5,526,945 

316,904 
7,101,680 
16, 778, 260 
3, 910, 247 
1, 099, 870 
4,071,165 
2,819,150 
8,478,905 
5,298,675 
2, 920, 601 
3,285,270 

894,600 
1,789,100 
3, 017, 660 
6,489,850 

901, 475 
1,786,676 
3,404,720 
4, 107, 505 
1,394,425 
7, 619, 755 


$559, 630 

1,201,190 
757, 800 
574,863 
293, 589 

1,388,715 
277, 021 

1,288,435 

1,531,777 
592,847 

1,128,739 
942,065 
144, 395 
861,210 
717,320 
659, 705 
620,570 

1,121,004 
298,200 

1,348,166 
581,930 
323,510 
488,625 
681, 405 
661, 045 

1,441,521 

1,512,510 
905,932 
976, 885 
719,580 
520, 280 
767,930 

1, 283, 490 
8S4, 100 

1,100,175 
716,615 
462, 718 
119,285 
546, 530 
349, 003 
913,265 
967, 425 
831, 995 

1,363,535 
673,165 
714, 345 
677, 481 
723,025 

1,656,025 
626,683 
343,929 

1,556,345 
633,690 

1,349,415 
857, 205 
486, 489 

1,389,050 
180,900 
467, 568 

1, 062, 350 
800, 275 
187,270 
492, 066 
664, 420 
727,985 
362, 555 

1,486,935 


$2, 746, 920 
9,650,385 
6,512,520 
4,619,730 
1,492,263 
7, 918, 080 
1,108,215 
5,442,235 
5,642,482 
4,124,935 
4,982,899 
5,315,495 

753, 525 
4,140,210 
4,111,370 
6,525,205 
4,294,712 
6, 485, 084 
1, 870, 260 
9,374,657 
4, 732, 410 
1,600,471 
6,213,660 
4,670,125 
3,255,545 
6,046,786 
6,407, 4S0 
4, 264, 398 
8, 299, 030 
5,657,950 
1,795,610 
8,927,157 
8,942,810 
3, 900, 405 
4,671,435 
4,386,755 
2,595,322 

382, 534 
3,133,780 
2,035,699 
7,265,185 
5,092,765 
6, 193, 465 
5,298, c60 
4,499,620 
6,211,200 
3,847,005 
7,824,705 
18, 434, 285 
4, 536, 932 
1,443,799 
5,627,510 
3, 452, 840 
9,828,320 
6, 155, 8S0 
3,407,090 
4,674,320 
1,075,500 
2,256.668 
4,080,010 
7,290,125 
1,088,745 
2,273,742 
4, 069, 140 
4,835,490 

1, 756, 980 
9,106,690 






Allen 


406 
250 
256 
104 
263 
187 
233 
258 
236 
224 
258 
194 
270 
192 
239 
227 
252 
266 
289 
135 

89 
250 
242 
230 
302 
265 
340 
248 
190 
304 
255 
247 
185 
238 
292 
353 
242 
229 
220 
196 
319 
340 
239 
309 
368 
282 
281 
228 
279 
213 
235 
255 
316 
250 
252 
248 

54 
248 
246 
279 
235 
207 
261 
250 
266 
304 


635 
453 
890 
248 
643 
035 
145 
508 
492 
271 
466 
G-J7 
645 
837 
360 
050 
329 
419 
893 
817 
881 
120 
500 
:m 
920 
278 
757 
904 
343 
476 
728 
472 
074 
349 
995 
197 
774 
726 
349 
082 
887 
023 
578 








$26 00 
17 98 
14 31 
39 03 
5 65 
22 47 

21 83 

17 86 

22 21 
20 56 

5 00 

13 61 
29 88 
26 52 

18 87 
25 90 

7 02 
28 60 
34 84 
17 00 
24 84 

19 29 

14 09 
19 96 


2,814 




3,216 


Blackford 


1,161 




3,466 






Carroll 


3,096 


Cass 


Clark 


5,143 


Clay 


5,520 




4,037 
1,305 










3,647 






DeKalb 


5,054 










Elkhart 






2,051 


Floyd 










2,370 


Pulton 


1,187 




3,023 






17 47 
33 34 
27 10 

9 18 
» 34 90 
32 08 
21 07 
19 60 
14 95 

7 35 
16 80 


3,419 










1,208 




2,663 




3,400 




2,998 




2,661 








1,677 
















37 05 
15 88 


21 21 












23 11 


1,971 




215... 
4001... 
033 










13 64 
24 25 






428 
m 1 
113 
336 
638 
867 
805 
130 
404 
933 
125 
831 
320 
313 
663 
360 
700 
767 
018 
799 










Marshall 








6 00 










10 00 
31 02 
24 61 
13 50 

18 76 

19 87 
9 06 






35 44 




14 82 




11 90 


Noble 


36 50 


Ohio 


4 17 




12 62 








25 00 
4 62 


18 96 












20 00 

19 28 

8 00 

30 26 






26 15 






Putnam 





101 



ERTY IN INDIANA, FOR THE YEAR 1878. 



$205 

5,369 

638 

224 

152 

462. 

6 

349 

2,086 

1,113 

308 

320 

24 

298 

721 

466 

329 

607 

111 



303 
2,230 
253 
141 
179 
317 
327. 
198 
332 
233 

63 
171 
431 
551 
362 
324 
102 
151 
711 

81 

319 

990 

336 

125 

202 

1,309 

204 

437 

40,302 

3,884 

45 
682 
341 
638 
211 
156 
400 



188 
344 
106 
405 
401 
65 



4,156 
895 
270 
194 
694 
22 
486 

1,582 

1,454! 

572 

485 

74. 

396 

1,293 
544 
465 
645 
196 



426 
2,227 
433 
440 
266 
728 
486 
226 
518 
333 
182 
398 
869 
715 
425 
582 
155 
. 333 
1,343 
236 
654 
1, 350 
548 
202 
237 
1,567 
472 
656 
20, 491 
442 
117 
641 
555 
993 
435 
204 
672 
154 
164 



365 

468 
147 
568 
552 
115 



H g 



"2 ft 



$402, 930 
9, 525, 878 
1, 433, 990 

495 ~ 

347 

1,156 

29 

836 
3,668 
2,568 



806 

98 

694 

2,015 

1,010 
795 

1,253 
308 

2,430 
730 

4,457 
687 
581 
445 

1,046 
813 
425 
850 
567 
245 
569 
130 

1,267 
788 
906 
258 
48 

2,055 
317 
974 

2,340 
874 
328 
439 

2,876 
676 

1,093 

60, 793 

826 

162 

1,324 
896 

1,631 
646 
361 

1,073 



554 
813 
254 
973 
954 
181 
1,593 



202, 805 
214, 187 



$191 35 
69 95 
131 68 
133 32 



112 78 



216 54 
55 81 
79 48 
15 50 



197 89 
".65'28 



105 17 
'"3102 



52 00 
64 22 
126 79 
183 99 
136 31 



150 55 



68 76 
142 08 
131 25 

10 97 
116 93 

39 11 



153 66 



$509 59 
154 09 
299 62 
333 57 



270 05 



499 33 
159 54 
199 69 
66 33 



552 58 



346 30 
"9607 



203 00 
213 92 
382 46 
422 68 
296 28 



220 12 
434 05 
303 45 
29 40 
486 34 
169 72 



365 09 



$960, 


2 


7<s<;, 


2 


541, 


1 


058, 




540, 


2 


094, 




422, 


1 


635, 


2 


674, 


1 


913, 


1 


200, 


2 


150, 




363, 


1 


476, 


2 


416, 


2 


514, 


1 


133, 


2 


075, 




913, 


3 


438, 


2 


167, 


2 


455, 


1 


659, 


2 


513, 




968, 


2 


404, 


1 


645, 


1 


462, 


1 


644, 


1 


574, 


1 


296, 


2 


444, 


3 


363, 


1 


390, 


1 


610, 


1 


479, 




953, 


1 


253, 


3 


313, 




901, 


2 


496, 


3 


089, 


2 


257, 


1 


664, 


1 


064, 


2 


739, 


1 


940, 


2 


021, 


15 


311, 


1 


356, 




499, 


1 


538, 


1 


706, 


2 


965, 


1 


779, 




745, 


2 


383, 




547, 


1 


114, 


1 


444, 


2 


174, 




834, 




921, 


1 


189, 


1 


699, 




609, 


3 


004, 





a 

u 


i 

cs 

So 

0) 

H 


. 


"o 




0) 

> 


$128,060 




2, 253, 295 


$5, 435 


354, 260 


2,605 




1,659 
1,740 


126,612 


344, 095 


1,680 


322, 195 


1,770 


861,660 


7,730 


511,209 


3,193 


455, 180 


2,821 


309, 490 


2,170 


191,415 


1,060 


277,821 




236, 820 
972,832 
518, 540 


1,620 
1,643 
2,079 






238, 584 


2,458 


97, 180 


755 


425, 142 


1,890 


129, 915 


1,050 




665 




355,805 


2,760 


206, 406 
391,560 


1,770 
3,530 


734, 177 


6,905 


264, 280 


2,260 


339, 230 


1,475 


547, 445 
49, 935 


3,550 
285 


186, 023 
70, 596 




945 


405, 946 


3,644 


259, 395 


2,065 


845, 640 


2,870 


155, 045 


500 


1,947,460 


11,008 


1, 900, 000 


6,955 


238, 855 


1,440 


780, 886 


4,980 


869, 630 


3,162 


196, 800 


1,117 






405, 940 


2,215 


94, 157 


1,365 


148, 372 


495 


1, 072, 140 


2,486 


663 


171 


145, 600 


1,210 


130, 140 












1,496,611 


9,247 


134, 250 
208, 388 
684, 620 


955 

80 

4,820 



> s 

■gfi 

H 



24,221, 


10, 844, 


6, 175, 


2, 508, 


11,514, 


1, 560, 


8, 237, 


12, 854, 


9,121, 


7,522, 


8, 583, 


1,215, 


6,311, 


8, 820, 


2,753, 


7,197, 


10, 333, 


3, 092, 


15,243, 


7, 860, 


9, 729, 


8,987 


7,895, 


4,669, 


9, 498, 


9, 225, 


6,152, 


11,002, 


8,104, 


4, 338, 


12,681, 


13,606, 


6, 824, 


7,411, 


7,323, 


3, 856, 


5,750, 


8,574, 


3,664 


10,997, 


10,523, 


10, 173, 


7,446, 


7, 961, 


13, 764, 


6, 704, 


11, 725, 


94, 539, 


7, 593, 


2, 303, 


8,490, 


6, 056, 


14, 833, 


8,583, 


4, 662, 


9, 205, 


1,825, 


3, 586, 


5,671, 


10, 149, 


2, 735, 


2, 453, 


7, 738, 


7, 624, 


2,757, 


14,393, 



102 



ABSTRACT OF THE ASSESSMENT OF PROPERTY 



<u I 

<z 
Is 

C5 ^ 

pp-) a 

»■* 3 

t>- o c 



NAME OF COUNTY. 



Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

St. Joseph 

Steuben 

Sullivan 

Switzerland.... 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 

Vermillion 

Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington... 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 



Total 22,393,037 



284,177 
279, 762 
251,942 
121,694 
261,564 
257,815 
189,572 
285, 656 
193, 679 
285, 081 
139,774 
312,091 
165, 126 
104,402 
147,766 
153,576 
252, 986 
255, 773 
229, 915 
248,505 
324, 574 
220,161 
234, 545 
316,719 
211,683 



86,107,555 
2,232,020 
8, 188, 870 
792, 682 
8,857,170 
2, 572, 335 
812, 460 
4, 885, 695 
2, 820, 740 
3,418,680 
2, 208, 915 
8,403,880 
2,190,940 
2, 865, 720 
4,134,835 
2,922,345 
7, 153, 3S0 
3,975,275 
4, 620, 230 
2,973,565 
3,013,075 
9,498,100 
3,158,825 
3, 662, 488 
3,313, 



$369, 789, 340 



fl, 143, 655 
498, 840 
841,470 
186,077 
902, 075 
771,460 
90, 020 
842, 830 
934,000 
704, 630 
362,490 

1, 290, 985 
392, 475 
404, 200 
778, 120 
499, 670 
775, 710 

2,044,045 
931, 175 
706, 915 
558, 470 

1, 856, 705 
748, 190 
781,046 
468, 430 



$73, 059, 484 



«s 






$7, 251, 210 
2, 730, 860 
9,030,340 
979, 759 
9, 759, 245 
3, 343, 795 
902, 480 
5,728, 525 
3,754,740 
4, 123, 310 
2, 571, 405 
9,694,865 
2,583,415 
3, 269, 9i;C 
4,912,955 
3,422,015 
7,929,090 
6,019,320 
5,551,405 
3, 680, 480 
3,571,435 

11,354,805 
3,907,015 
4,443,534 
3,786,438 



$454,989,476 



825 52 
9 76 



8 00 
37 34 
13 00 

7 06 
20 05 
19 32 



18 39 



31 32 
33 24 

22 2 
31 34 

23 03 

24 10 
14 09 

9 2 



31 10 
14 02 
17 65 






3,264 

2,603 



1,125 



725 
"2,"(K» 



6 83 

133 47 

17 10 



36 1$ 
17 91 



27 37 
19 48 



103 



IN INDIANA, FOR THE YEAR 1878 — Continued. 



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$576, 820 

38, 915 

148,690 

16,687 

394,550 

282, 660 


$830, 020 
176,010 
397, 435 
79,503 
703, 155 
453,585 
21, 930 

1,953,725 
311,675 
425,655 
224, 240 

2,366,935 
158,800 
165,255 

4,568,830 
309, 605 

3, 910, 035 
948,695 
198, 485 
376, 665 
287,425 

3,044,360 
266, 845 
294, 760 
311,965 


$1, 406, 840 

214,925 

546, 125 

96, 190 

1, 097, 705 
736,245 
35,105 

3, 806, 180 
549, 565 
627, 360 
344,855 

5,817,420 

262, 940 

227, 245 

10, 972, 650 

438, 470 

9,665,185 

1,464,030 
247, 530 
565, 685 
392,040 

4, 854, 955 
504, 340 
478,405 
614, 755 


$177 27 
14 95 


$432 34 
82 56 


$2,588,225 
1,042,425 
3, 668, 200 

381, 608 
2,450,970 
1, 480, 210 

153, 185 
3,797,935 

895, 305 
1,751,070 

808, 647 
5, 377, 735 

671,450 
1,537,100 
6,336,825 
1,451,860 
5,121,710 
2, 554, 540 
1, 286, 680 
1, 484, 980 
1,825,935 
6,938,565 
1,312,865 
1,281,061 
1,629,773 


$643, 689 
321,680 


$4,070 
3,330 


$11,894,034 
4,313,220 

13,244,665 
1,678,749 

13,719,780 
5, 613, 375 
1,462,295 

14,112,265 
5,199,610 
6,728,975 
3,724,907 

21, 810, 645 






219, 968 
409, 005 
53,125 
368, 652 
776, 830 


1,224 
2,855 










13, 175 

1,852,455 

237, 890 


13 44 


44 92 


2,873 
3,095 


90 00 


209 00 


201,750 


226, 205 


1,030 


120, 615 






3,450,485 
104, 140 






915, 685 

363, 738 

136, 220 

131, 325 

272, 220 

1, 149, 525 

529, 585 

. 389,450 

33,640 

88,185 

433,355 

82,510 

862, 220 

498, 768 


4,940 






3,881,543 


61,990 


90 76 

479 80 

75 36 


332 71 
821 06 
256 38 




5, 170, 485 
22, 355, 855 

5,586,045 
23,872,120 


. 6,403,820 
128, 865 
5,755,150 
515, 335 
49, 045 
189, 020 
104, 950 


2,100 
1,480 
5,610 






10,567,475 
7,476,695 
5, 731, 145 


27 38 


138 20 


1,630 
500 
510 
145 
765 
2,012 
1,550 






5, 879, 620 


1,810,595 






23, 581, 825 
5,807,495 
6, 567, 232 
6,531,284 


237,495 






183,645 
302, 790 


27 09 
78 16 


174 79 
187 00 


$96,549,684 


831,525,248 


8176,991,646 






$187,748,459 






$850, 616, 98T 











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LAND DEPARTMENT. 



Office of Auditor of State, 
Indianapolis, Ind., November 1, 1878. 

Hon. E. Henderson, 

Auditor of State: 

Sir : I have the honor of submitting to you the following report 
of the Land Department of the State for the fiscal year ending 
October 31, 1878. 

This department was created by an act of the General Assembly 
approved March 3, 1877, and under the authority vested by said act, 
such of the land records as could be had have been deposited in this 
office and placed in proper and suitable cases. They embrace the 
original tract books, registers, quarterly reports, ledgers, journals, 
day-books, etc., pertaining to the following United. States land dis- 
tricts, viz: Vincennes, Fort Wayne, Winamac, Laporte, Craw- 
fordsville, Terre Haute, Indianapolis, Brookville and JefFersonville, 
making this branch tolerably complete, but there are many omis- 
sions that should, by all means, be supplied from the records at 
Washington City. Also, the various books relating to the Swamp 
Lands, Saline Lands, University Lands, Michigan Road Lands, and 
the two Seminary townships in Gibson and Monroe counties; also 
the records of that portion of the Canal Lands sold by the State 
prior to the passage of the act appointing Trustees and transferring 
the sale of the lands to their charge ; but the records of the Canal 
Lands are very incomplete, owing principally to the reason that 
the affairs of the canal in this State have been and still are in 
the hands and under the control of a receiver appointed by the 
United States Court, and the trust has not at the present time been 



108 

discharged, hence it has been impossible to obtain the custody of the 
majority of the records pertaining to the lands of the State. The 
lands throughout Indiana are divided into the following kinds: 
Canal, Michigan Road, Swamp, Saline, University, Seminary and 
School Lands, and in some sections into locations, surveys, donations 
to heads of families, military donations and Iridian reservations; 
and as the manner by which the State acquired title from the 
United States is a question frequently asked of this department, I 
have deemed it best in this report to give a short summary of such 
information concerning the accesssion of said lands by the State as 
will prove beneficial to various owners throughout the State. 

CANAL LANDS. 

The land known as Canal Land was granted by the United States 
to the State of Indiana, to enable the State to construct the Wabash 
and Erie Canal, and is embraced in three separate grants. The 
first of these grants was approved March 2, 1827, (see Statutes at 
Large, vol. 4, page 236), and granted a quantity of land equal to 
one-half of five sections in width on each side of said canal (and 
reserving each alternate section to the United States) for the pur- 
pose of uniting the waters of the Wabash River with those of Lake 
Erie. The second grant was approved February 27, 1841, (see 
Statutes at Large, vol. 5, page 414) and confirmed to the State the 
selections made for that portion of the canal which lies between the 
mouth of the Tippecanoe River and Terre Haute. The third and 
last grant to the State of lands for this purpose was approved 
March 3, 1845. To enable the State to complete the canal from Terre 
Haute to the Ohio River, there was granted to the State a moiety 
of the unsold lands in a strip five miles in width on each side of 
said canal, as likewise a further grant of a moiety of all the lands 
remaining unsold in the Vincennes Land District with provisos. 
These three grants and the selections made under them embrace an 
area of 1,439,279 acres, as shown by the report of the Commissioner 
of the General Land Office. 

[THE MICHIGAN ROAD LANDS.j 

By article 2 of the treaty held and concluded near the mouth of 
the Mississinewa, upon the Wabash, on October 16, 1826, between 
the United States and the chiefs and warriors of the Pottawatamie 
tribe of Indians, there] wasj ceded to the United States a strip 



109 

of land commencing at Lake Michigan and running thence to 
the Wabash River, one hundred feet wide for a road ; and also 
one section of good land contiguous to said road for each mile 
of the same, and also for each mile of a road from the termina- 
tion thereof through Indianapolis to the Ohio River, for the pur- 
pose of making a road as aforesaid from Lake Michigan by way 
of Indianapolis to some convenient point on the Ohio River. On 
the 2d day of March, 1827, the State was authorized to locate and 
make the road and dispose of the lands. This species of land lies 
principally in northern Indiana, and embraces, according to the 
selections that were confirmed, an area of 170,580.24 acres. The 
State's title was confirmed to the above lands by act of Congress 
approved March 2, 1831. (See Statutes at Large, vol. 4, page 473). 

SWAMP LANDS. 

The State obtains her title to this branch of the lands by patents 
from the United States issued under authority of an act of Con- 
gress approved September 28, 1850, entitled " an act to enable the 
State of Arkansas and other States to reclaim the Swamp Lands 
within their limits, etc." Patents have been issued to the State and 
are* now on file in this office, covering an aggregate acreage of 
1,256,430.96. 

UNIVERSITY LANDS. 

Prior to the organization of the State government, Congress 
granted a township of land (township No. 2, south of range No. 11 
west), to the territory, to enable the territory to endow a college; 
and by an act of Congress approved April 19, 1816, (see Statutes at 
Large, vol. 3, page 290), a second grant of a township of land was 
made to the State ; township No. 8 north, range 1 west, in Monroe 
county was selected, which lands have been sold, and the funds 
applied to the State University at Bloomington, excepting, however, 
about 4,000 acres, part of township No. 2 south, range 11 west, in 
Gibson county, which was sold by authority of the Territorial Legis- 
lature, and the proceeds applied for the benefit of the Vincennes 
University. 

The Saline Lands of the State lie in the counties of Orange, 
Washington, Monroe and Brown ; but the greatest amount, in fact 
nearly all of it, lies in Orange county. This species of the lands 
were granted to the State by act of Congress approved April 19, 



110 



1816, (see vol. 3, page 390, of the United States), and comprise 
an area of 24,435 acres. 

The Sinking Fund and Surplus Revenue records are also con- 
nected with this department, and owing to the manner of keeping 
the records of cash receipts, it is not unfrequently a difficult task to 
find the records of satisfaction to many of these loans. I have pro- 
cured three new ledgers, into which I propose to transcribe the 
payments from the cash books to the ledger, keeping each loan sep- 
arately, which will, when completed, show the exact condition of 
every loan made from these funds, but, as there were about four 
thousand loans made, it will necessarily require considerable time to 
complete it. 

The following tables show the number of patents issued during 
the year: 

UNIVERSITY LANDS. 



Date. 


Name of Patentee. 


Description. 


& 

0J 
CQ 


a 

o 


a5 
bo 

a 

OS 


6 


3 

w 


County. 


November 6, 1877.. 




N W qr S W qr.. 
S W qr S W qr... 
N W qr N W qr.. 
S E qr S E qr 
S W qr N E qr... 
NEqrN Eqr.... 
N W qr N E qr... 
S W qr N E qr... 
S W qr N E qr... 
S E qr N E qr 
E hf S W qr 
N E qr S E qr 


19 
19 
30 
34 
36 
35 
35 
31 
36 
13 
3 
13 


28 

28 

28 

29 
1 N 
1 N 
1 N 
1 N 

29 

3S 

29 

29 


8W 

8 W 

8 W 
3 W 
2 W 
2 W 
2W 
2 W 

2 W 

3 W 

9 W 
3W 


34 
34 
35 
40 
40 
40 
40 


59 

59 
22 








November 6, 1877.. 








William Helfrick 




March 1, 1878 
March 15, 1878 


Wm. K. Lashbrooks, .,, 


Orange. 
Orange. 
Orange. 
Orange. 


March 15,1878 




March 18, 1878 




March 23,1878 




40 
40 




April 27, 1878. 
May 3, 1878 










August 5, 1878, , 


William H. Paul 


40 






Total, 12. 





SWAMP LANDS. 



Date. 


Name of Patentee. 


Description. 


£3 
O 

V 
CO 


a 
£ 
o 
H 


o 

to 

a 

OS 

M 


6 
o 
< 


o 

n 
a 

3 

w 


County. 


<D 

at 
ft- 

o 


Nov. 26, 1877 
Dec. 1, 1877.. 




S W qr N W qr 
N W qr N E qr 
8 W qr S W qr 


10 

27 
26 
13 
4 
4 
?7 


31 

29 
31 

32 
2S 
2S 
8 
2S 
31 


4 

3 

1 

8 

12 

12 

11 

6W 

IE 


40 
40 
40 
27 
54 
35 
61 
39 
40 


10 
80 
70 
66 
05 


Pulaski 

Pulaski, ,,, 

Sullivan ... 
Fulton 


24,743 
24, T44 

24,745 
24, 74S 


John F. Reaf 


Mar. 2, 1878. 
May 1,1878.. 
April 9, 1878 
April 9,1878 
June 21,1878 
July 30,1878 
Mar. 1,1878.. 


Orlando D. Smith 
Wm. R. Nofsinger ,,.. 

Abner G. Deputy 


Lot No. 2 N Wqr.... 
W pt frac of W hf ... 
E hf frac S E qr 


2,383 
2,384 
24,747 
2,385 
7,471 


Wm. Ebbeling 


N E qr N W qr 2 
S E qr N W qr. 1 33 




Total, 9. ' 







Ill 



The following Patents for Swamp Lands have issued to correct 
the description in the Patents formerly issued : 



Date. 


Name oe Patentee. 


Description. 


a 


a 
P 
o 
H 


09 

60 

c 
ts 

M 


0) 
U 

< 


■3 
■S 

0> 
H 

a 

3 

W 


County. 


5 

"5 
ft 

6 


Mar. 11,1878 




N EqrS Wqr. 


35 
10 


IS 

IN 


12 W 
11 W 


40 
40 








July 13, 1878 




N EqrNEqr 




Total cor. pats, 2. 







SALINE LANDS. 



Date. 


Name of|Patentee. 


Description. 


a 
_o 

o 

to 


a 
o 


60 

a 

eS 

M 
2 W 


u 
40 


J3 

•S 

a> 

M 

C 

a 


County. 


a 
d 


Dec. 22, 1877 




N W qr S W qr 


22 


2 










Total 1. 

Grand total, 24. 







Herewith is subjoined a list of forfeited lands which have been 
abandoned, or which are held and occupied by persons unknown to 
this office. 

No. 657. The southwest quarter of the southeast quarter, and the 
northeast quarter of the southwest quarter of section 13, in town- 
ship 7 north, range 9 east, containing 80 acres ; also, the southwest 
quarter of the northeast quarter of section 11, in township 7 north, 
range 8 east, containing 40 acres, all in Jennings county. Forfeited 
in 1868, by Sarah A. Vail, for non-payment of $821.13. 

No. 701. Lot in Southport, Marion county, 13 rods and 4 feet 

by feet, in the east half of the southeast quarter of section 7, 

township 14 north, range 4 east. Forfeited by William Wheeler in 
1862 for non-payment of $131.57. 

No. 718. The east half of the southwest quarter, and the west 
half of the southeast quarter of section 18, in township 25 north, 
range 5 west, in Jasper county. Forfeited in 1870 by John A. 
Bradshaw for non-payment of $1,022.90. 

No. 789. The northwest quarter of the southeast quarter of 
section 33, in township 18 north, range 7 west, containing 40 acres, 



112 

in Fountain county. Forfeited in 1866 by John Jarvis for non- 
payment of $627.97. 

No. 790. The southeast quarter of the southeast quarter of sec- 
tion 33, in township 18 north, range 7 west, containing 40 acres, in 
Fountain county. Forfeited in 1866 by O. P. Jarvis for non-pay- 
ment of $627.98. 

No. 872. The southeast quarter of the southwest quarter of sec- 
tion 10, and the northwest quarter of the northeast quarter of section 
22, in township 30 north, range 3 west, in Pulaski county. Forfeited 
in 1868, by D. A. Farley, for non-payment of $613.31. 

No. 791. The northeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section 
33, in township 18 north, range 7 west, containing 40 acres, in 
Fountain county. Forfeited by DeWitt C. Reynolds, December 10, 
1874, to the State for the use of the college fund for non-payment 
of '$1,017.63. 

No. 763. The southwest quarter of the southeast quarter of sec- 
tion three (3), the northeast quarter of the southeast quarter of 
section four (4), and the southeast quarter of the northwest quarter 
of section thirty-two (32), all in township 30 north, range 7 west, in 
Jasper county, containing 120 acres. Forfeited by John Shearer, 
and bid in by the State, December 10, 1874, for $701.22. 

No. 657. The southwest quarter of the southeast quarter of sec- 
tion 13 ; the southeast quarter of the southwest quarter of section 
13, both in township No. 7 north, range 9 east, and containing 40 
acres each ; also the southwest quarter of the northeast quarter of 
section 11, in township No. 7 north, range 8 east, containing 40 
acres, and all situate in the county of Jennings. Forfeited by Sarah 
A. Vail, January 16, 1877, for non-payment of $1,106.97. 

No. 873. Lots No. 15, 16 and 17, in John A. Brouse & Co.'s 
subdivision of outlot No. 7 and part of lot No. 6, of Robinson & 
Voorhees's addition to the city of Indianapolis. Forfeited by John 
A. Brouse and Mary C. Brouse, January 16, 1877, for non-payment 
of $579.91.1 

No. 890. Lot No. 7 of Robinson & Voorhees's subdivision of 
that part of the southeast quarter of section 5, in township 15 
north, range 4 east, lying north of the center of the National Road, 



113 

containing 2 58-100 acres. Forfeited to college fund by Charles 
W. Brouse, January 16, 1877, for non-payment of $602.94. 

No. 992. The northeast quarter of the northwest quarter of sec- 
tion 17, in township No. 8 north, range 10 east (except one square 
of five acres in the southeast corner of the above described tract), 
being 35 acres in Ripley county. Forfeited by E. L. Davis for the 
non-payment of $418.26 ; forfeited January 16, 1877. 

No. 1,011. Lots Nos. 29 and 30, in Allen's second north addi- 
tion to Indianapolis. Forfeited by James O. Woodruff for non- 
payment of $606.40; forfeited January 16, 1877. 

No. 998. The northeast quarter of the southeast quarter of sec- 
tion 25, in township No. 30 north, in range No. 7 west, in Jasper 
county. Forfeited by David Yeoman and Emma E. Yeoman, 
April 22, 1878, for non-payment of $589.50. 

No. 1,044. The northwest quarter of the southeast quarter of 
section 6, in township 10 north, of range 4 east, in Brown county. 
Forfeited by Conrad Kiskey and Rebecca Kiskey, April 22, 1878, 
for non-payment of $420.29. 

No. 1,047. Lots Nos. 32, 33, 34 and 35, in John G. Webb's 
subdivision of lots 13, 15 and 16, in Han way & Hanna's Oak Hill 
suburb to Indianapolis. Forfeited by Elizabeth Hainey, April 22, 
1878, for non-payment of $591.60. 

No. 1,050. Lot No. 2, in J. M. Myers' re-subdivision of lots Nos. 
56, 57, 58 and 59, in Drake and Mayhew's second addition to Indian- 
apolis. Forfeited by James M. Myers and Mary G. Myers, April 
22, 1878, for non-payment of $589.52. 

No. 1,068. Lot No. 4, in John Young's first addition to Uni- 
versity Place, in the town of Irvington, as laid out on Recorder's 
Plat, being 50 feet front on National avenue by 184 feet deep to an 
alley, situated in Marion county. Forfeited by Annie C. Young, 
April 22, 1878, for non-payment of $235.44. 

The following described lands and city and town lots are the 
property of the State, conveyed to secure the State against loss 
through defalcation : 

No. 1. The southwest quarter of the northwest quarter of section 
8 Aud. Rep. 



114 

3, township 16 north, range 5 west, in Putnam county, containing 
45 40-100 acres. 

Conveyed to the State by Sheriff's deed, and by quit claim from 
Mason and Mary Griffith, on judgment obtained against Hiram E. 
Talbott and others. 

No. 2, Lots No. 18, 19 and 20, in Morton, Coffin and Wright's 
subdivision of out lot No. 149, in the City of Indianapolis. 

Conveyed to the State by John Stumph and wife and Samuel 
Lefevre. 

No. 3. The east half of the soutlrwest quarter of section 5, town- 
ship 30, range 3 west; the west half of the southeast quarter of sec- 
tion 5, township 30, range 3 west; the northeast quarter of the 
northwest quarter of section 8, township 30, range 3 west; the west 
half of the northeast quarter of section 8, township 30, range 3 
west ; the southeast quarter of the northeast quarter of section 8, 
township 30, range 3 west, containing 320 acres, all in Pulaski 
county, and 

No. 4. The south half of the northeast quarter of section 15, 
township 34, range 2 west, containing 80 acres, in Starke county. 

Conveyed to the State by Daniel A. Farley, ex-Treasurer of 
Pulaski county, to reimburse the Swamp Land funds, and Univer- 
sity Land funds, in which funds losses to the amount of two thousand 
dollars had occurred while the said Farley was Treasurer of Pulaski 
county. 

No. 5. The northeast quarter of the northeast quarter of section 
1, township 12, range 7 west, containing 40 acres in Clay county. 

Conveyed to the State by Aquilla Jones. 

No. 6. Lots No. 242 and 243 in the "North Burying Ground," 
in Marion county. 

Conveyed to the State by E. J. Peck and wife. 

No. 7. One hundred acres in the southeast quarter of section 1, 
township 15 north, range 2 east, in Marion county. 

Conveyed to the State by James P. Drake and wife, and by quit 
claim from James H. McKernan. 



115 

This land was originally purchased as a site for a House of 
Refuge, but, under an act in relation to the House of Refuge, ap- 
proved March 8, 1867, it was sold to one McCaslin, who subse- 
quently forfeited it by non-payment of purchase money, and the 
title of right reverted to the State. But it seems that, while the 
same was yet on the Tax Duplicate, in the name of McCaslin, it 
was sold for taxes, and Mrs. McCaslin bought it, and under this 
title they are still in possession ; to what extent this Tax Sale passes 
title, I am not apprised, but certainly they have a claim to the 
amount refunded them that they paid as taxes, from some source. 
This should be attended to at once, and the State placed in the 
possession of the land at once. 

No. 8. The southeast quarter of section 7, in township No. 27 
north, in range 4 west, containing 160 acres situate in White 
county. Conveyed to the State by Robert Ellis and Anna Maria 
Ellis. 

No. 9. Lot No. 1, on west side of White river, opposite the city 
of Indianapolis, and immediately south of the National road, known 
as the ferry landing. 

The above are lands held in fee simple. There are others, the 
principal of which are the canal lots in this city, which are in liti- 
gation, and consequently not enumerated with the foregoing. 

By act of the Legislature, of 1875, certain of these lands were 
ordered to be sold by the Auditor, Governor and Secretary of State. 
For a list thereof see the last report of this Department. Of these 
lands, the only tract that has been sold (since last reported) is the 
southeast quarter of the northwest quarter of section 8, township 
30 north, range 3 west, situated in Pulaski county; this tract was 
disposed of September 12, 1877, at the appraised price. Although 
every effort has been made to dispose of the remainder, it has not 
proven successful, owing to the fact that the appraisement is too 
great. I trust, therefore, they may be reappraised. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES E. BAKER, 

Land Clerk. 



BANK- DEPARTMENT. 



In compliance with the laws of the State, and for the protection 
of the depositors of Banks of Discount and Deposit, and Savings 
Banks, organized under the laws authorizing and regulating such 
corporations, I have caused an examination from time to time, as 
I deemed the public interest required, of such banks, and had the 
reports of such examiners made to me for approval, or such action 
as would protect public interests in the premises. Some Savings 
Banks, as appear in this report, have been wound up in time to 
protect their patrons from loss. 

There is a class of banks in Indiana doing a large business with 
the public, disounting and receiving deposits under the title of firms, 
known as banks of deposit and discount, liable only as business 
firms. This class of banking companies, or individual banks, 
are subject to no examination, are not required to make any pub- 
lished exhibit of their condition, and are only liable to their 
depositors, as other firms or individuals are for their indebtedness. 
I believe it is within the province of the Legislature to require this 
class of banks to report to the Auditor of State, and be subject to 
examination the same as banks organized under the act approved 
February 7, 1873. 

This class of banks, as has recently been decided by the Supreme 
Court, do not come under the title of brokers; they do not file any 
articles of association, but are partnerships or companies, the same 
as a mercantile or other business firm. They handle public and 
private deposits, discount on exchange, and do a regular banking 
business that the public have a right to be informed of from time 
to time, and should come under the supervision of the Bank Depart- 
ment of this office. I take the privilege to extract from a letter, 



117 

received from the Comptroller of the Currency, on the subject of 
this class of banks, and referred to me as follows: 

" By reference to my last report you will find that there were in 
Indiana 143 State Banks, Savings Banks and private bankers, with an 
aggregate capital of $5,912,000, and deposits of $11,072,000; these 
deposits should include both individual and bank deposits. There 
were in existence, October 2, 1876, in Indiana, 99 National Banks, 
with an aggregate capital of $17,258,000, and surplus, $4,808,000, 
with bank and individual deposits amounting to $14,286,682. 
Combining these two aggregates, you would have for Indiana as 
follows : 

Capital. Deposits. 

-State and Private Banks $5,912,000 00 $11,072,000 00 

National Banks 17,258,000 00 14,286,000 00 

Total $23,170,000 00 $25,358,000 00 

" A law of Congress requires the Comptroller to compile annually, 
from State reports, the items showing the condition of the State 
banks of each State. By reference to page 127 you will notice that 
only thirteen banks reported to the Auditor of State in 1875, with 
oapital of only $870,850.00, and deposits, $1,008,000.00. No later 
returns from the State banks of Indiana could be obtained in time 
for my report, and it is not probable that the report of the Auditor 
of State contains statements from all the banks organized under 
your State laws, which latter do not, I presume, require statements 
from all the banks, but only from one class thereof. These returns 
do great injustice to the State of Indiana. The passage of a law by 
your Legislature, requiring statements to be filed and published in 
the newspapers, and subsequently compiled by the State Auditor, 
giving returns from all banks, authorized by the laws of your State, 
would enable me to give Indiana the credit of her banking capital." 

I had a bill introduced in the Legislature two years ago, embodying 
the principles of the extracts given above, but, like much important 
legislation, on account of the limited session, it failed to become a 
law. I hope the Committee on Banking will look into the impor- 
tance of this matter, and present a bill on the subject. The follow- 
ing exhibits will show the condition of the several banks organized 
under the State law : 



118 



EXHIBITS OF THE SEVERAL BANKS ORGANIZED 
UNDER THE STATE LAW, AS ASCER- 
TAINED BY EXAMINATION. 



ADAMS COUNTY BANK, DECATUR. 
Resources. 

Bills discounted $112,949 22 

Due from banks 29,090 49 

Banking house 6,808 40 

Real estate 2,136 55 

Furniture and fixtures 2,368 92 

Stamps.. 302 00 

Interest 566 50 

Expense 652 97 

Cash on hand 10,986 87 

Total $165,861 92 

Liabilities. 

Capital $ 50,000 00 

Surplus 10,000 00 

Discount 3,145 22 

Exchange 151 82 

Undivided profits 2,507 43 

Dividend unpaid 25 00 

Deposits 97,198 47 

Due to banks 2,833 98 

Total $165,861 92 

Officers. 

Jesse Niblick, president; David Studabaker, vice-president; 
Robert B. Allison, cashier ; William H. Niblick, assistant cashier.. 

Directors. 

David Studabaker, Jesse Niblick, Robert B. Allison, Henry 
Derks, John Crawford, William G.^Spencer, John Meibers. 



119 

Stockholders. 

David Studabaker, Robert B. Allison, Harriet Studabaker, Jesse 
Niblick, William G. Spencer, John Meibers, William H. Niblick, 
David J. Spencer, Henry Derkes, Joseph J. Foster, John Craw- 
ford. 



CITIZENS' BANK, HAGEKSTOWN. 
Resources. 

Bills receivable $46,462 20 

Furniture and fixtures. 2,400 00 

Expense 510 35 

With other banks 6,674 46 

Cash 10,014 76 

Total $66,061 77 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock $32,000 00 

Surplus fund 8,000 00 

Discount and exchange 1,080 75 

Deposits 24,981 02 

Total $66,061 77 

Officers. 

David Fowler, president; J. W. Brooks, cashier. 

Directors. 

David Fowler, John Brooks, John Allen, S. J. Ford, J. W. 
Brooks. 

Stockholders. 

David Fowler, John Allen, S. J. Ford, John Brooks, Lewis Kin- 
sey, Mathew C. Brooks, Eli Petty, Joseph Reprogle, George M. 
Jordon, David Brown, J. W. Brooks, Elisha Brown, John Werk- 
ing (trustee), B. F. Jewett, Mathew Newcom, Nimrod E. Elliott, 
John Jewett. 



120 
CITIZENS' BANK, NOBLESVILLE. 

Resources. 

Loans and discounts $111,795 20 

United States bonds 16,200 00 

Due from banks and bankers 72,093 97 

Banking house 7,000 00 

Other real estate 1,000 00 

Furniture and fixtures 2,339 50 

Current expenses 2,178 75 

Premiums 1,500 00 

Cash 16,304 28 

Interest 1,980 24 

Total $232,391 94 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock paid in $60,000 00 

Surplus fund 800 00 

Discount 5,310 65 

Deposits 166,281 29 

Total $232,391 94 

Officers. 

William M. Locke, president; E. L. Bonebrake, cashier; Elbert 
Shirts, teller. 

Directors. 

William M. Locke, George H. Bonebrake, W. E. Dunn, Leonard 
Wild, S. N. Campbell. 

Stockholders. 

E. L. Bonebrake, Seth Green, Mary Hauk, John D. Hauk, Geo. 
H. Bonebrake, L. A. Estes, William M. Locke, Leonard Wild, 
Wm. E. Dunn, F. M. Hawkins, S. N. Campbell, Nancy N. Davis, 
Ann Hoag, W. & H. M. Cole, B. Bonebrake, Irwin & Oscar Fisher, 
Elbert Shirts. 



121 

CITIZENS' BANK, PORTLAND. 

Resources. 

Loans and discount $86,714 52 

Overdrafts 2,066 27 

Due from banks 13,394 03 

Banking house 2,173 93 

Eeal estate 355 00 

Furniture and fixtures 1,465 55 

Current expenses 1,207 28 

Taxes 440 93 

Currency 17,687 86 

Remittance 233 63 

Interest 778 24 

Total $126,517 24 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock $30,000 00 

Surplus 7,500 00 

Discount 3,951 07 

Undivided profits 238 27 

Premium 35 22 

Individual deposits 84,792 68 

Total $126,517 24 

Officers. 

C. S. Arthur, president ; J. B. Jaqua, cashier ; N. B. Hawkins, 
assistant cashier. 

Directors. 

N. B. Hawkins, C. S. Arthur, J. W. Headington, Isaac Silver- 
nale, William H. Reed, J. B. Jaqua, Charles A. Mackenbach. 

Stockholders. 

Kirshbaum & Silvernale, R. Kirshbaum, Samuel Kahn, J. B. 
Jaqua, Headiugton & LaFaliette, Joseph P. Nixon, John W. Head- 
ington, N. B. Hawkins, C. S. Arthur, E. G. & A. F. Vaughn, C. 
A. McEnbaugh, William H. Reed, S. P. Morrow, H. B. GrisselL 



122 
CITIZENS' BANK, ROCKPOKT. 

Resources. 

Loans and discounts , $77,163 55 

Due from banks and bankers 28,543 37 

Furniture and fixtures 1,191 80 

Current expenses 609 35 

Cash items 9,678 19 

Total $117,186 26 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock paid in $67,800 00 

Surplus fund 1,600 00 

Discount, exchange and interest 986 14 

Individual deposits 46,800 12 

Total $117,186 26 

Officers. 
James Hammond, president; W. T. Mason, cashier. 

Directors. 

James Hammond, T. R. Hardy, L. A. Niblack, D. J. Axton, 
William Caddock, C. L. Wedding, W. T. Mason. 

Stockholders. 

George Bochstahler, John Stevenson, Jacob Rumbold, Elizabeth 
Richter, Ford Wilkinson, Valentine Schmidt, Henry Weller, Thos. 
R. Hart, C. L. Wedding, David J. Axton, William Jacobs, L. O. 
DeBruler, estate of Jas. W. Lenimon, C. J. Mason, Wm. Stevenson, 
W. T. Mason, Wm. Caddock, Chas. Muesser, estate of Henry Her- 
man, L. A. Niblack, S. T. Johnson, David Schaaf, George M. Rice, 
Herman Rothert, George Thomas, D. L. Morgan, Jno. Biedenkopf, 
Jacob Schaaf, John Schaaf, James D. Hammond, estate of Henry 
Herman, John G. Gath, H. W. Biedenkopf, Jas. Hammond, Jacob 
Weller, I. E. Richardson. 



123 

CITIZENS' STATE BANK, NEW CASTLE. 

Resources. 

Loans and discounts $133,596 76 

Overdrafts.../. 1,377 94 

Stocks and bonds 20,500 00 

Due from banks and bankers 11,140 97 

Real estate, furniture and fixtures 8,401 00 

Profit and loss.. 817 77 

Expenses and taxes paid 1,903 33 

Premiums 7,175 00 

Cash 10,112 28 

Total $195,025 05 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock paid in $130,000 00 

Surplus fund 5,522 00 

Discount and exchange 4,535 79 

Deposits 54,967 26 

Total |195,025 05 

Officers. 

John R. Milliken, president; Benjamin Shirk, vice-president; 
David W. Kinsey, Cashier; Thos. B. Milliken, Assistant Cashier. 

_- Directors. 

John R. Milliken, Benjamin Shirk, W. M. Pence, Isaac Menden- 
hall, G. M. Byer, W. D. Cooper, Calvin Bond, John Payne, D. W. 
Kinsey. 

Stockholders. 

W. M. Pence, D. W. Kinsey, C. Bond, I. Mendenhall, George 
M. Byer, John R. Milliken, Clarinda Lennard, N. T. Nixon, James 
Laer, Nathan Milliken, Enos Boyd, Benjamin Shirk, W. A. Rifner, 
L. M. Hess, W. D. Cooper, John Payne, Wilson Wisehart, Lewis 
Kinsey, Simeon B. Hayes, E. K. Stratton, N. T. Clawson, Henry 
Brenneman, Robert H. Polk, Julia Ann Shroyer, Frank M. Milli- 



124 

ken, Jessie and Albert Stratton, T. S. Lewis, A. D. Bond's heirs, 
Mrs. Sarah Harvey, Calvin Henshaw, Thomas B. Milliken, Mrs. 
Sarah M. Harvey, Frank E. Vestal, Charles C. Powell, Nettie E. 
Sims, Anna M. and Sarah Underhill. 



CITIZENS' STATE BANK, PETERSBURGH. 

Resources. 

Loans and discounts $40,647 05 

Due from banks and bankers 15,449 54 

Furniture and fixtures... 700 00 

Current expenses 533 10 

Taxes paid 610 01 

Currency 19,387 34 

Total $77,327 04 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock paid in $25,000 00 

Discount 3,418 75 

Other undivided profits 4,020 50 

Individual deposits 44,887 79 

Total $77,327 04 

Officers. 

James Shawhan, president; M. W. Thornton, cashier; E. M. 
Smith, assistant cashier. 

Directors. 

James Shawhan, C. E. Montgomery, P. C. Hammond, C. A. 
Burger, John J. Eizert. 



125 

Stockholders. 

C. E. Montgomery, M. Gray, James Shawhan, C. A. Burger, 
Jno. H. Miller, John J. Eizert, W. H. DeWolf, P. C. Hammond, 
M. W. Thornton. 



FARMERS BANK, FRANKFORT. 
Resources. 

Loans and discounts $134,805 27 

Overdrafts 3,203 00 

Due from banks and bankers 10,640 21 

Banking house 7,850 58 

Other real estate 30,585 26 

Furniture and fixtures 3,115 31 

Current expenses and taxes paid 6,301 04 

Cash items (including stamps) 1,105 31 

Fractional currency (including nickels) 36 36 

Specie 1,447 40 

Currency 8,282 50 

Property account 859 28 

Total $208,231 52 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock paid in $100,000 00 

Interest 14,992 2a 

Individual deposits 93,099 29 

Bills payable 140 00 

Total $208,231 52 

Officers. 

Samuel Ayers, president; J. Douglass, cashier. 

Directors. 

Milton Hanson, Samuel H. Doyal, John Anderson, William Sauls- 
bury, Robert McCamrock, James V. Kent, Samuel Ayers. 



126 

Stockholders. 

Milton Hanson, Samuel H. Doyal, John Anderson, William Sauls- 
bury, George Koontz, Abraham Hallcraft, Robert McClamrock, 
Huston Davis, Albert G. Ayers, James V. Kent, Samuel Ayers, J. 
Douglass, E. Black, Margaret Lehman, James Ostler. 



FAEMERS' BANK, MOOEESVILLE. 
Resources. 

Loans and discounts $68,215 51 

Due from banks and bankers 13,342 90 

Real estate 3,218 10 

Furniture and fixtures 1,178 76 

Current expenses 1,272 04 

Cash items ■ 8,090 75 

Total 895,318 06 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock paid in .... $50,000 00 

Surplus fund 3,080 00 

Interest * 1,954 54 

Individual deposits 37,198 52 

Cashier's checks outstanding 3,085 00 

Total $95,318 06 

Officers. 

Charles Reeve, president ; John A. Taylor, cashier. 

Directors. 

Charles Reeve, Joseph N. Taylor, Lot M. Hadley, Ebenezer 
Tomlinson, Samuel M. Rooker, Eli J. Sumner, Jonathan L. Moffitt, 
John F. Hadley, William O. Thompson. 



127 

Stockholders. 

Lydia A. Whitson, William B. Thompson, Daniel Sheets, Fred- 
erick Sheets, John F. Hadley, Eli J. Sumner, Joseph N. Taylor, 
Jonathan Moffitt, John Sheets, Edwin Johnson, Charles Reeve, 
Benjamin Woodward, Wm. O. Thompson, John Edwards, Sophia 
Hadley, Samuel M. Rooker, Robert Smith, John J. Height, H. E. 
Satterwhite, Ebenezer Tomlinson, Peter Greeson, Letha A. Hill, 
Lot M. Hadley, William Dewees, Joseph Rawusley. 



FAEMEES' AND MEECHANTS' BANK, WINCHESTEE. 
Resources. 

Loans and discounts $155,372 77 

Due from banks and bankers 10,416 45 

Current expenses 272 17 

Cash 10,943 59 

'Total.. $177,004 98 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock paid in $80,000 00 

Surplus fund .- 4,700 28 

Discount 2,105 72 

Exchange 6 00 

Individual deposits 90,192 98 

Total $ 177,004 98 

Officers. 

Nathan Reed, president; James Moorman, vice-president; T. F. 
Moorman, cashier. 

Directors. 

Nathan Reed, James Moorman, Thomas Moorman, Simon Ram- 
sey, Robert S. Fisher. 



128 

Stockholders. 

John Hiatt, Henry Moorman, A. O. Marsh, A. C. Beeson, Nathan 
Reed, James Moorman, Simon Ramsey, Thomas Moorman, T. F„ 
Moorman, Mrs. P. B. Reed, R. S. Fisher, R. Kirshbaum, Samuel 
Kahn. 



HAMILTON BANK, FOET WAYNE. 

Resources. 

Notes and bills discounted $440,098 IT 

U. S. bonds 34,100 00 

Other stocks and bonds 8,993 67 

Premium on U. S. bonds 3,605 15 

Real estate 4,187 50 

Furniture and fixtures 1,418 74 

Current expenses and taxes paid 7,488 94 

With other banks 59,207 44 

Cash 91,343 50 

Total $650,443 11 

Liabilities. 

Capital Stock $200,000 00 

Surplus fund 32,000 00 

Profit and loss 13,785 76 

Individual deposits 226,534 74 

Due banks and bankers 49,508 40 

Certificates of deposit 128,614 21 

Total $650,443 11 

Officers. 

Charles McCulloch, president; John Mohr, jr., cashier; Joseph 
D. Mohr, assistant cashier. 



129 

Directors. 

Jessie L. Williams, August Trentman, E. L. Crittenden, Mont. 
Hamilton, Edward P. Williams, Frederick Eckert, Charles Mc- 
Culloch. 

Stockholders. 

Hugh McCulloch, Jessie L. Williams, Charles McCulloch, John 
Mohr, jr., J. D. Mohr, William Fleming, A. H. Hamilton, P. A. 
Hamilton, E. P. Williams, F. Eckert, B. Trentman & Son, Roths- 
child Sons, T. B. Hedikin, E. L. Chittenden, Mont. Hamilton, Car- 
rie R. McCulloch, M. C. Hedikin, Geo. L. Little. 



LAKE CITY BANK, WAESAW. 

Resources. 

Loans and discounts $111,732 95 

Due from banks and bankers 16,746 74 

Real estate 10,784 37 

Current expenses 2 00 

Taxes paid 10 00 

Cash items (including stamps) 11,543 32 

Total $150,819 38 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock paid in $76,800 00 

Surplus fund 5,415 81 

Exchange 26 65 

Interest 187 13 

Profits undivided 5,667 00 

Individual deposits 62,722 79 

Total $150,819 38 

Officers. 

Hudson Beck, president ; J. H. Lewis, cashier. 
9 Aud. Rep. 



130 

Directors. 

H. B. Stanley, Hudson Beck, Hiram Hall, Jackson Glessner, 
Washington Bybee, C. C. Reynolds, Jno. Gravener, Edward Moore, 
James McMurray. 

Stockholders. 

M. Beck, E. Moore, J. H. Lewis, Hudson Beck, Jas. McMurray, 
H. B. Stanley, J. Lechenwalker, Henry Berst, Rachel Wallace, 
Caleb Hendy, Jackson Glessner, Milton Hise, Albert Tucker, Wash- 
ington Bybee, Richard Lovey, Moses Wallace, John C. Hessell, 
Charles Sarber, Hiram Hall, John R. Black, Jacob Werrick, Wm. 
Banford, C. C. Reynolds, Samuel C. Gray, Benjamin Yohn, John 
Gravener, Levi Hetrick, Wash. Wallace, G. W. Wilson, J. W. 
Quick, B. Travis, Albert Beck, S. A. Ulrey. 



PEOPLE'S BANK, PORTLAND. 

Resources. 

Loans and discounts $90,925 25 

Due from banks 2,065 03 

Bank 3,104 19 

Real estate 1,489 98 

Furniture.... 2,060 97 

Expense 532 60 

Cash 23,929 92 

Total $124,107 94 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock $50,000 00 

Surplus 2,409 95 

Discount and interest 1,347 22 

Exchange 65 27 

Individual deposits 70,285 50 

Total $124,107 94 



131 

Officers. 

J. M. Haynes, president; Adelrna Lupton, vice-president; W. 
C Johnson, cashier; W. M. Haynes, assistant cashier. 

Directors. 

J. M. Haynes, ¥m. Newton, James Moorman, W. C. Johnson, 
R. S. Fisher, John R. Perdieu, Adelma Lupton. 

Stockholders. 

James Moorman, $. S. Fisher, W. C Johnson, J. M. Haynes, 
Joseph Kidder, Ira Denny, A. Lupton, N. Cadwallader, G. W. 
Studaybaker, James Cottem, W. M. Haynes, John R. Perdieu, J. S. 
Johnson, John Fisher, J. W. Drake (deceased), William Newton, J. 
G. Crowell. 



SAINT JOSEPH VALLEY BANK, ELKHART. 

Resources. 

Loans and discounts $42,481 68 

Due from banks and bankers 9,723 52 

Furniture and fixtures 1,300 00 

Current expenses 999 25 

Cash items 9,729 10 

Total $64,233 55 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock paid in $25,000 00 

Surplus fund 2,145 40 

Profit and loss 3,815 96 

Individual deposits 33,272 19 

Total $64,233 55 

Officers. 

A. M. Tucker, president; W. H. Knickerbocker, cashier. 



132 

Directors. 

P. Morehaus, A. M. Tucker, N. Sage, Alexander Pope, Patrick 
Henry. 

Stockholders. 

P. Morehaus, A. M. Tucker, N. Sage, Alexander Pope, Patrick 
Henry, W. H. Knickerbocker, Moses S. Adams. 



VEKMILLION COUNTY BANK, NEWPORT. 

Resources. 

Loans and discounts $61,240 14 

United States bonds and securities on hand 10,000 00 

Due from banks and bankers. 17,075 44 

Eeal estate 5,728 00 

Furniture and fixtures 719 19 

Current expenses 738 40 

Cash items (including stamps) 18,099 26 

Total $113,600 43 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock paid in $60,000 00 

Surplus fund 7,585 00 

Call deposits 43,285 11 

Undivided profits 2,293 29 

Time deposits 400 00 

Profits undivided 2,222 26 

Due to banks and bankers 14 77 

Total $113,600 43 

Officers. 
Abel Sexton, president ; Stephen Collett, cashier. 



133 

Directors. 

Abel Sexton, John Collett, Clark Leavitt, Joseph Collett, R. H. 
Nixon, J. W. Parrott. 

Stockholders. 

Joseph Collett, John Collett, Joseph J. Daniels, Jennie C. Tur- 
ner, Mary H. Campbell, M. Campbell (guardian), Isaac Porter, 
€lark Leavitt, R. H. Nixon, John W. Parrott, R. E. Rodds, Abel 
Sexton, S. S. Collett. 



134 



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136 



Indianapolis, Ind., December 14, 1878. 

Hon. E. Henderson, 
• Auditor of State. 

Dear Sir : — By your direction and in conformity to my appoint- 
ment made through your department, under the provisions of an 
act entitled " an act to authorize and regulate the incorporation of 
Banks of Discount and Deposit in the State of Indiana," approved 
February 7, 1873, I have made examination of the following 
banks, organized and being operated under the provisions of said 
act, viz: 

Hamilton Bank Fort Wayne. 

Adams County Bank Decatur. 

Citizens' Bank Portland. 

People's Bank Portland. 

Citizens' Bank Hagerstown. 

Citizens' Bank New Castle. 

Citizens' Bank Petersburgh. 

Vermillion County Bank Newport. 

Farmers' Bank Frankfort. 

Citizens' Bank Noblesville. 

Citizens' Bank Rockport. 

St. Joseph Valley Bank ..Elkhart. 

Lake City Bank Warsaw. 

Citizens' Bank Union City. 

Farmers' and Merchants' Bank Winchester. 

Farmers' and Merchants' Bank Mooresville. 

Although the following banks were not examined by me — Ran- 
dolph County Bank, at Winchester, and Commercial Bank, at 
Union City — yet I include them in my report, for the purpose of 
making a full and complete exhibit of all the banks of this class, 
organized under the law at this time. 

As I have included the two latter banks in my report, for reasons 
before given, without any knowledge of their condition based on 
personal investigation, I desire to add why examination was omit- 
ted. 

The Randolph County Bank (formerly a National Bank) organ- 
ized under the State Law in October of the present year ; therefore, 



137 

because of its recent organization, examination was not deemed 
necessary at this time. 

In relation to the Commercial Bank of Union City, I desire to 
state, in justice to the State Departments, as well as to the bank, 
that an error occurred in the transmission, delivery or reception of 
the certificate of stock paid in and bonds of officers of the bank, and 
by that error information failed to reach the Bank Department of 
such a bank being organized under the law. I find upon examina- 
tion, however, that the bank had complied with the law in all the 
primary steps necessary to complete its organization ; first, in having 
properly filed its articles of association, and in a short time subse- 
quently forwarding its certificate of paid-up stock and bonds of 
officers, which papers are now on file in the Secretary of State's 
office. In view of all the facts in the case the proper blanks were 
forwarded to the officers of the bank, with instructions to make out 
certified statement of condition (which they have done), which 
statement is, with others, inclosed. 

Under my instructions, I have taken the utmost care to make the 
examinations full and complete, thoroughly investigating such 
records within and without the banks as would give information 
touching the responsibility of the banks, their stockholders, officers, 
and business relations. The result has been most satisfactory as 
to the responsibility of these institutions. 

The system of books adopted by the several banks is very similar, 
and commendable because of its simplicity. While some exhibit a 
superiority in detail, no special mention can be made of one without 
doing injustice to another — where all are so uniformly good it 
would be unwise and unjust to discriminate. For the general 
excellent condition of the banks I would call attention to the de- 
tailed statement of each, heretofore given. 

Since the last annual report the following banks have been 
organized : 

Randolph County Bank, Winchester, formerly a National Bank, 
and the Commercial Bank, Union City. 

The following have discontinued under the State law : 

The Madison County Bank, at Anderson, converted into a 
National Bank, and the Bank of New Carlisle, at New Carlisle, 
converted into a private bank. 

In conclusion, I desire to add that, in pursuance of your sugges- 
tion, 1 have compiled the following statement, which shows the 
aggregate amount of resources and liabilities of these institutions, 



138 

which figures are based upon examination during the month of 
November, except as before stated, in the case of the two last banks 
in the list: 

Resources. 

Loans and discounts $2,050,183 27 

Real estate, furniture and fixtures 131,041 38 

Due from other banks 397,177 65 

Bonds and securities 120,073 82 

Profit and loss 817 77 

Expense 33,779 06 

Cash 357,920 40 

Total $3,090,993 35 

Liabilities. 

Capital stock $1,228,600 00 

Surplus 100,778 94 

Due banks 52,497 15 

Deposits 1,623,200 45 

Undivided profits 10,811 23 

Profit and loss 17,908 01 

Discount 32,999 60 

Interest 24,197 97 

Total. $3,090,993 35 

I also enclose you tabutated statement, showing their condition, 
giving the amount and character of the several accounts in detail. 
All of which is respectfully submitted, 

JAMES H. RICE, 

Examiner. 



SAVINGS BANKS. 



In conformity with the provisions of the Act for the "Organiza- 
tion of Savings Banks, and the safe and proper management of 
their affairs," approved May 12, 1869, I appointed Joseph J. 
Bingham and John H. Piercy, to examine the several Banks organ- 
ized in accordance with said act, and herewith submit the report of 
said examiners, exhibiting in detail the resources and liabilities of 
each, and their financial condition at the date of examination. 
While these examinations furnish much valuable information con- 
cerning the resources and liabilities of the banks, yet they occur 
at such long intervals that the financial condition of the banks may 
be materially changed by the bankruptcy of borrowers and endorsers, 
and even mortgage security that was amply good when taken, 
would now, by the depreciation in the value of such security, be 
inadequate to secure the loan. The object of a Savings Bank is to 
give the poor a bank of deposit for their savings from earnings, 
where it can be put at interest for their benefit. It was not expected 
that each small depositor would understand the law, or the respon- 
sibility of the bank. Under our law, no capital stock is required to 
organize a Savings Bank, and no individual or corporate responsibility 
attached to the trustees. Only the officer and agent having cus- 
tody of the funds is held responsible by bond, and he is only liable 
for loss or damage occasioned by willful misconduct or neglect. So 
the depositors in a Savings Bank have to rely upon the reputation 
of its officers for honesty, for the faithful and judicious investment 
of the funds to secure dividends, and even the return of the sum 
deposited. 4 

This system is an anomaly in banking. The depositors are the 
stock-holders, and they have no voice or control in the manage- 
ment of these banks. The trustees, who may not be even depositors, 



140 

and who may be destitute of pecuniary responsibility after they 
become Trustees, have the entire control in their management and 
the investment of their funds, and no liability unless it can be 
shown that there has been mismanagement by their violation of the 
law which regulates them. The Savings Bank act is based upon 
fallacious principles in banking. It presumes that the banks are 
at all times ready to pay their depositors on demand, and yet the 
trustees are authorized to invest their deposits in loans to run 
twelve months. The banks can not pay dividends unless their 
deposits are invested on interest-paying loans, and yet they are 
liable to be called upon, at any time, for the payment of these 
deposits. These institutions can only be run profitably as long as 
the depositors have confidence in their safety, or unless some exi- 
gency arises which creates a necessity for the withdrawal of their 
deposits. There can be no stability in such a system of banking, 
and no safety when financial revulsions occur and depreciation in 
securities necessarily follows. 

There would seem to be a moral responsibility on the part 
of the corporators or trustees, but these times require a legal 
responsibility. The citizens of our State have escaped from loss, 
through failures of Savings Banks, much better than Eastern States, 
but, in my judgment, stronger safeguards should be thrown around 
these banks for the protection of depositors. The laws of Ohio pro- 
vide for capital stock, for the security of depositors, as follows : 

"That, for the purpose of carrying on the business of said corpor- 
ation, and for the security of depositors, it shall be the duty of the 
persons named in said certificate of incorporation, and such others 
as shall become associated with them as stock-holders in the corpor- 
ation, to raise and form a capital of not less than fifty thousand 
dollars, to be divided into shares of one hundred dollars each, to be 
paid in as shall be required by the board of trustees; but at least 
one-half of each subscription to said capital stock shall be fully paid 
in by the respective subscribers thereto before said corporation shall 
commence business, and the remainder may be called in from time 
to time as the trustees may require." 

It is further provided, for the liability of stock-holders, as follows : 

"That each stock-holder of any such association shall be liable to 
an amount equal to the amount of stock subscribed and owned by 
such stock-holder, in addition to said stock, for the purpose of 
securing the creditors of said association." 



141 

Unless the trustees and officers are made legally responsible I 
believe the law should be repealed, to take effect in the future, 
restricting the organization of new banks, and giving the banks now 
organized ample time to collect their outstanding resources, and 
meet their deposits. 



DETAILED REPORTS OF EXAMINERS. 

GERMAN SAVINGS BANK, LAFAYETTE. 

Hon. E. Henderson, 

Auditor of State. 

Dear Sir: — In pursuance to your appointment to examine the 
German Savings Bank, of the city of Lafayette, and to report to 
you its " true condition," I commenced its examination at the close 
of its business December 27, 1877. The investigation was made at 
the request of the trustees. After a careful scrutiny of its affairs, I 
found no evidence whatever to question the honesty of its manage- 
ment. Not being acquainted with the value of its bills receivable, 
I requested Messrs. Owen Ball and Christian M. Nesley to aid me 
in making the appraisement, and I am satisfied I could not find two 
gentlemen better qualified for that duty. 

The secretary of the bank gave me the following statement of the 
condition of the bank at the close of its business on the evening of 
December 27 : 

Assets. 

Cash on hand $4,412 30 

Loans secured by mortgages 67,929 41 

Loans secured by personal indorsements 21,251 43 

City orders 22 50 

Total $93,615 64 

Liabilities. 

Due depositors $87,789 80 

Surplus fund 3,000 00 

Interest 2,825 84 

Total 893,615 64 



142 

The following is the result of my examination of the condition 
of the bank, in connection with the appraisement of Messrs. Ball 
and Nisley : 

Statement of the condition of the German Savings Bank at the 
close of its business on the 27th of December, 1877. 



Cash on hand in bank $203 00 

Deposit in First National Bank 4,209 70 

Premium on bonds 260 00 

Accrued interest on bills receivable which 

are past due or in judgment 1,365 95 

City order for $25, valued at 22 50 

Bills Receivable, Secured by Personal Indorsements: 

Good, and interest paid -$15,219 50 

Good, and past due 640 00 

Good, and in suit 650 00 

Good, and in judgment 3,813 73 

Bills Receivable, Secured by Mortgage on Real Estate: 

Amount valued good 67,784 69 

88,108 12 



Total $94,169 27 

Liabilities. 
Amount due depositors 87,789 80 



Excess of assets over liabilities $6,369 47 

There are Bills Receivable, which are thus classified, not included in the 
above amount: 

Bad $600 00 

Doubtful 472 59 

Total $1,072 59 



Owing to the distrust in the public mind occasioned by the defal- 
cation of the cashier of the Second National Bank of Lafayette, and 
the closing of its doors, over $18,000 of the deposits in this bank 

I 



143 

were withdrawn in the past thirty days, and the bank had received 
notice of the withdrawal of about $24,000 in the next thirty days. 
After an effort, the trustees were unable to rediscount their bills re- 
ceivable to meet these demands. Under these circumstances I 
.thought the trustees would not be justified in making a dividend on 
the 1st of January, as they had not even the means to meet the 
calls of the depositors. The trustees held a meeting on Saturday 
evening last, and after a careful consideration of the condition of 
the bank, concluded it was for the interest of all concerned that the 
bank should go into liquidation, and in connection with the deposit- 
ors make application to the court for the appointment of a receiver. 

With careful management, and especially if the receiver can be 
invested with the authority to exchange the bills receivable of the 
bank for the claims of the depositors, it can be wound up without 
loss and in a short time, but otherwise it will take a long time to 
settle its affairs. 

The following are the trustees and officers of the bank : 

Trustees: — John B. Ruger, James Murdock, Christ. Scherer, 
Fred. Thieme, E. B. Glick, Louis Kimmel, Theodore Gaasch, John 
A. Ries, Consider Tinkler, James B. Falley. 

Officers: — John B. Ruger, president; Consider Tinkler, vice 
president ; Louis Kimmel, secretary and treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. J. BINGHAM. 

Indianapolis, December 31, 1877. 

Note. — This bank has closed up its business since this examination, and has 
settled with its depositors in full and to their satisfaction. 



INDIANAPOLIS SAVINGS BANK, INDIANAPOLIS. 

Hon. E. Henderson, 

Auditor of State : 

In compliance with your appointment "to examine the Indiana- 
polis Savings Bank, of the city of Indianapolis, and to report to you 
at as early a day as possible the true condition of its affairs," under 
""an act to provide for the organization of Savings Banks, and the 



144 

safe and proper management of their affairs," I make the following 
exhibit of its condition : 

On the 11th of this month the officers of the bank gave me the 
following statement of its affairs, at the close of its business on the 
evening of the 10th inst. : 

Assets. «► 

Bills receivable $271,736 30 

United States bonds 13,267 68 

Cash 48,142 46 

Office furniture 2,720 93 

Expense 2,284 37 

Real estate 5,611 18 

Total $343,762 92 

Liabilities. 

Deposits $ 327,330 10 

Surplus fund 9,143 59 

Interest 7,289 23 

Total $343,762 92 

The officers of the bank gave me every facility to make the ex- 
amination required, and I made a thorough investigation of its 
affairs. It will be seen that I discard all fictitious accounts, and 
make a plain statement of the resources and indebtedness of the 
bank. There is due to the depositors the sum of {$327,330.10, and 
the question is, what has the bank got to represent and cancel that 
indebtedness, or make secure the deposits and pay dividends upon 
the same ? I make the following estimate of the value of its 

Assets : 
Cash in bank $4,105 29 

Cash Deposited in Banks, Subject to Call, at 4 per cent. Interest : 

Fletcher & Sharped Bank $5,000 00 

Bank of Commerce 4,000 00 

Merchants' Bank 5,000 00 

Indiana National Bank 4,000 00 

Indiana Banking Co 4,000 00 

First National Bank 5,000 00 

Citizens' Bank 5,000 00 

Indianapolis National Bank 6,000 00 

$38,000 00 



145 

Deposit discounts, payable when dividend 

is declared $6,037 17 

United States bonds, 5 per cents., par valuefl 1,500 00 
Market value, add 5f premium 675 62 



Bills Receivable. 

Secured by personal indorsements, on which 

interest is paid — good $62,408 31 

Secured by mortgages on real estate, on 

which interest is paid — good 74,234 34 

Secured by personal indorsements and mort- 
gages on real estate, on which interest 
is paid— good 20,971 66 

Notes past due, secured by personal indorse- 
ments and real estate mortgages, val- 
ued at 68,141 10 

Notes in judgment or suit, with personal 

and mortgage security, valued at 37,040 02 



12,175 62 



262,795 43 



Accrued interest on past due notes and 
those in judgment or suit, all with per- 
sonal and mortgage security, which is 
collectible 7 ; 000 00 

Real estate — lot and house on North East 
street, cost $5,611.18, and lot in North 
Indianapolis, valued at... 5,000 00 

Office furniture, cost $2,790.23, valued at.. 1,800 00 



$336,913 51 
Liabilitie